Introduction to Psychological Science

 

Course Number: PSY 141 A

CRN Number: 90085

Class cap: 24

Credits: 4

 

Professor:

Elena Kim

 

Schedule/Location:

Mon  Wed     8:30 AM9:50 AM Olin 201

 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis  

 

Crosslists: Mind, Brain, Behavior

How does the mind create the reality we perceive? How do experiences shape the brain, and how do processes in the brain influence thought, emotion and behavior?  This course investigates these and similar questions by studying the science of the human mind and behavior. The course covers topics such as memory, perception, development, psychopathology, personality, and social behavior. A focus is on the biological, cognitive, and social/cultural roots that give rise to human experience. Additionally, the course will consider how behavior differs among people, and across situations.

 

Introduction to Psychological Science

 

Course Number: PSY 141 B

CRN Number: 90086

Class cap: 22

Credits: 4

 

Professor:

Justin Dainer-Best

 

Schedule/Location:

Mon  Wed     10:10 AM11:30 AM Olin 201

 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis  

 

Crosslists: Mind, Brain, Behavior

How does the mind create the reality we perceive? How do experiences shape the brain, and how do processes in the brain influence thought, emotion and behavior?  This course investigates these and similar questions by studying the science of the human mind and behavior. The course covers topics such as memory, perception, development, psychopathology, personality, and social behavior. A focus is on the biological, cognitive, and social/cultural roots that give rise to human experience. Additionally, the course will consider how behavior differs among people, and across situations.

 

Design & Analysis in Psychology I

 

Course Number: PSY 201

CRN Number: 90087

Class cap: 18

Credits: 4

 

Professor:

Justin Hulbert

 

Schedule/Location:

Lab:

 Tue  Thurs    10:10 AM11:30 AM Hegeman 102

Thurs    1:30 PM3:30 PM Albee 100

 

Distributional Area:

LS Laboratory Science  

This course provides an introduction to the research designs and data analyses central to psychological science, helping to build a strong understanding of research methods, ethics, and statistics. This course is required for students prior to moderation in Psychology and is built around hands-on laboratory experiences designed to illuminate experimental psychology for intended majors. This course must be taken before the second course in the two-part sequence, Design & Analysis for Psychology II (PSY 202). Together, these courses are intended to provide a strong foundation for designing, conducting, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating empirical research in the discipline. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychological Science or its equivalent, and sophomore status at the College.

 

Gender in the History of Psychological Disorders

 

Course Number: PSY 216

CRN Number: 90088

Class cap: 24

Credits: 4

 

Professor:

Elena Kim

 

Schedule/Location:

 Tue  Thurs    11:50 AM – 1:10 PM Hegeman 102

 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis  

Crosslists: Gender and Sexuality Studies

This course examines the history of abnormal psychology from the perspective of women’s experiences within this field. We will explore the role that psychiatry has played in defining and shaping what has been considered ‘normal female’ as opposed to ‘normal male’ behavior. The course begins with the history of conceptualizing the ‘female madness’ starting from the witchcraft persecution in Europe to the emergence of diagnostic categories such as “neurasthenia’ and ‘hysteria’ which were frequently applied to women in the 19 th and early 20 th centuries. We will discuss biological explanations used to explain mental disorder in women and associated psychiatric practices of the past. The key point of the course is to look at how gender roles and stereotypes may have contributed to definitions of mental illness with varied impacts on women and men. For example, we will read materials about how women who deviated from their ascribed gender roles were continuously likely to be categorized as ‘insane’. In the second part of the course, our focus will be on how diagnoses have changed over time and the modern day gender biases still found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Intersections of gender with race, class and sexual subjectivity in the history of abnormal psychology will be examined throughout the course. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychological Science or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the Cluster A requirement for the psychology major.

 

Trauma

 

Course Number: PSY 217

CRN Number: 90091

Class cap: 22

Credits: 4

 

Professor:

Justin Dainer-Best

 

Schedule/Location:

Mon  Wed     3:30 PM4:50 PM Reem Kayden Center 103

 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis  

This course explores what it means to experience, deal with, and overcome trauma. It investigates the psychological factors that contribute to trauma; symptoms relating to trauma; the evolution of our understanding of the term itself; and the etiology, diagnosis, consequence, and treatment of trauma-related disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Topics will also include intimate partner violence, and the physiological impacts of trauma, transgenerational trauma, and race-based trauma. We will explore divergent theories of trauma; readings will include nonfiction accounts, empirical and review articles, clinical case studies, and sections from treatment manuals. Prerequisite: PSY 141; however, students with foundations in Sociology, Human Rights, Anthropology, and related disciplines are encouraged to contact the instructor.

 

Attention

 

Course Number: PSY 235

CRN Number: 90090

Class cap: 22

Credits: 4

 

Professor:

Tom Hutcheon

 

Schedule/Location:

Mon  Wed     11:50 AM1:10 PM Reem Kayden Center 115

 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis  

To deal with the impossibility of handling all inputs at once, the nervous system has evolved mechanisms that are able to bias processing to a subset of things, places, ideas, or moments in time. These mechanisms are collectively referred to as attention and play a critical role in the way we interact with and experience the world. This course will focus on the physiological basis of attention, the ways attention shapes perception, the limits of attention, and strategies for cultivating attention. In addition, we will critically consider claims that our attention is being “hacked”, that attention spans are decreasing and that we are ancient brains in a high-tech world. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychological Science. This course fulfills the Cluster C requirement for the psychology major.

 

Drugs and Human Behavior

 

Course Number: PSY 237

CRN Number: 90089

Class cap: 24

Credits: 4

 

Professor:

Frank Scalzo

 

Schedule/Location:

 Tue  Thurs    11:50 AM1:10 PM Reem Kayden Center 115

 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis  

 

Crosslists: Mind, Brain, Behavior; Science, Technology, Society

This course will explore the biological bases for the behavioral effects of several psychoactive substances including therapeutic compounds, such as antipsychotics and antidepressants, and drugs of abuse.  The course will focus on mechanisms of drug action and physiological and behavioral effects.  Broader societal issues such as drug addiction, drug policies and drug testing, and controversial therapeutic interventions will be discussed in relation to selected compounds.  Prerequisite: An introductory Psychology or Biology course, or consent of the instructor.

 

Sleep!

 

Course Number: PSY 353

CRN Number: 90094

Class cap: 12

Credits: 4

 

Professor:

Justin Hulbert

 

Schedule/Location:

 Tue      3:10 PM5:30 PM Olin 303

 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis  

People spend roughly one-third of their lives asleep. All too many spend the rest of their lives chronically underslept. What are the pressures that drive us to sleep? What are the benefits of sleep and the risks of not sleeping enough? In this upper-level seminar, we will attempt to answer such questions by reviewing the empirical literature and designing studies to better understand how we can get the most out of sleep. The course, which also may be of interest to students pursing a concentration in Mind, Brain, and Behavior (MBB), is open to moderated students who have the instructor’s permission or have already completed at least one of the following possible prerequisites: Cognitive Psychology (PSY 230), Learning & Memory (PSY 234), Neuroscience (PSY 231), or Introduction to Neurobiology (BIO 162).

 

Psychobiology of Stress and Mental Illness

 

Course Number: PSY 391

CRN Number: 90093

Class cap: 12

Credits: 4

 

Professor:

Frank Scalzo

 

Schedule/Location:

  Wed     9:10 AM11:30 AM Henderson Computer Center 106

 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis  

 

Crosslists: Mind, Brain, Behavior

Recent advances in the understanding of the neurobiology and physiology of stress have changed the way stress is viewed, both as a primary phenomenon and as a secondary factor that precipitates or causes a variety of psychiatric disorders. The latter include phobias, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and schizophrenia. This research conference will examine recent findings on the mechanisms and biological consequences of stress and will explore links between these effects and psychiatric disorders as reported in journal articles. Students will be expected to read and develop critiques of these articles as well as make class presentations. This seminar is intended for students who have moderated in psychology or biology, but is open to students with suitable background.

 

Senior Conference

 

Course Number: PSY 405

CRN Number: 90095

Class cap: 30

Credits: 1

 

Professor:

Tom Hutcheon

 

Schedule/Location:

   Thurs    4:00 PM5:00 PM Preston Theater

 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis  

In Senior Conference, psychology majors will cultivate the skills necessary to complete a successful Senior Project and continue to build community among their cohort. Topics will include: scientific writing, approaches to evidence, data collection, data analysis, and data management. Professional development and preparing for life after Bard will also be emphasized. Enrollment is required for psychology majors who will begin their psychology Senior Project during the Fall 2022 semester.

 

Experiment Analysis and Design in Affective Science

 

Course Number: PSY  CL

CRN Number: 90092

Class cap: 6

Credits: 2

 

Professor:

Justin Dainer-Best

 

Schedule/Location:

   Thurs    1:30 PM3:30 PM Preston 128

 

Distributional Area:

None 

This is the first semester of a two-part sequence. Interested students should contact Professor Dainer-Best before registration at jdainerbest@bard.edu. Over the two semesters of this course, students will develop psychological theories, design behavioral tasks to test them, collect data from human participants using those tasks, and analyze the resulting data. Research foundations will connect to clinical psychology and the relationship between mood and cognition. Weekly meetings will involve discussion of empirical articles and practice/instruction in programming. The first semester will focus on experiment design and data collection using online tools. The second semester will focus on data analysis using R. Class assignments will involve implementation of tasks, discussion and analysis of empirical articles, and presentation of proposals. Students interested in programming or data science are especially encouraged to apply. A final presentation will cap each semester.