Course:

EUS 101  Introduction to Environmental and Urban Studies

Professor:

Monique Segarra  

CRN:

13946

Schedule/Location:

 Tue Fri 10:20 AM11:40 AM Reem Kayden Center 103

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

Instructional Mode:

In Person  

Class/room cap

20

 

  

Humans have profoundly altered the character of Earth’s biosphere since the advent of agriculture and urbanization 10,000 years ago. This course explores how global problems such as climate disruption, species extinction, and depletion of fossil soils, fuels, and waters are interlinked with one another but also with social problems such as financial instability, widening economic inequality, food insecurity, intensifying conflict and militarization, and declining public health. We review the empirical evidence of major environmental problems; consider which academic disciplines and practical skills are required to tackle them; and contemplate alternative political options open to governments and communities.  Issues will be considered at a variety of scales—from the level of individual responsibility to the local, regional, national, and global dimensions. EUS 101 and 102 are the foundational courses of the EUS program and are required for moderation. No prerequisite.

 

Course:

EUS 102  Environmental System Science

Professor:

Robyn Smyth  

CRN:

13947

Schedule/Location:

Lab:

Tue  2:00 PM4:00 PM Reem Kayden Center 115

Fri 2:00 PM5:00 PM Rose Laboratories 306

Distributional Area:

LS Laboratory Science

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

16

 

  

The science needed to understand and address our complex socio-environmental challenges comes from a broad range of disciplines. In this course, we introduce and integrate core concepts and methodologies from physical, biological, and social sciences and practice system modeling to build your capacity to think critically about the causes and solutions to complex environmental problems and sustainability challenges. We will practice the scientific method as we develop mechanistic understanding of the drivers of climate change and the consequences for the hydrological cycle, ecological processes, and people.

 

Course:

EUS 107  Geophysics of Racism and Classism

Professor:

Gidon Eshel  

CRN:

13945

Schedule/Location:

Mon Th  10:20 AM11:40 AM Olin 101

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid (class meets in person: also open to students studying remotely)

Class/room cap

12

 

  

The focus of this discussion-based seminar is the disproportionate shouldering by some communitie of environmental burdens exerted by human actions.  Of such communities, we focus on those characterized by race or ethnicity, e.g., native Americans, African Americans, central American migrants; by poverty; by immigration status; or by a combination of those criteria. While social aspects of this uneven burden are widely discussed, the natural science manifestations are not. This gap is what this new course strives to bridge. While some discussion on politics and societal considerations is inevitable, our focus will steadfastly remain on the natural sciences, i.e., the physics, chemistry, biology and geology that govern environmental disenfranchisement of the above communities. The geophysical origins, mechanisms, and consequences of preferential vulnerability of the above communities we will discuss include storm surge, subsidence due to sediment flux cutoff, or forest fires. We will also address agricultural chemical toxicity, water quality degradation due to agricultural eutrophication and fracking, differential quality of municipal water systems, as well as exposure to air pollution by proximity to oil and gas facilities, transportation corridors or large scale agricultural production. You do NOT need deep mathematical roots or physical intuition. When I used math, it will be entirely self-contained and fully explained in class. Our key tool is reading scientific papers, and discussing them in class. If you are the silent type, who like to sit passively and not partake in the discussion, this class is emphatically not for you. The key requirement of this class is active, thoughtful participation in class discussion following careful, methodical reading of assigned material. To be in this class you must feel prepared and ready to engage with such diverse readings as scientific papers (our principal source) as well as cogent opinion pieces. You must also be comfortable expressing yourself clearly, using facts (as opposed to assertions) to back up your views, and be comfortable with courteously and respectfully handling opposing views.

 

Course:

EUS 203  Geographic Information Systems

 

Professor:

Susan Winchell-Sweeney  

CRN:

13948

Schedule/Location:

Fri   2:00 PM –4:20 PM 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

Instructional Mode:

Online/Remote

Class/room cap

9

 

  

2 credits Students will explore the various spatial analysis methods used by scientists, planners, and public-policy makers to improve the understanding and management of our world. Students will learn the fundamentals of modeling, data analysis and mapping using geospatial technologies. Practical exercises relate to themes studied throughout the year. In this project-based class, students begin by learning the fundamentals of using spatial information, conducting spatial analysis, and producing and interpreting maps. In the second half of the course, they apply these skills to a team-based research project of their own design. The program culminates in a poster session, where the students show their work to their peers, professors in the program, and the greater Bard community.

 

Course:

EUS 215  Food Systems: Human Health and Environmental Health

Professor:

Kris Feder  

CRN:

13948

Schedule/Location:

Mon   7:30 PM8:50 PM 

Th  7:30 PM8:50 PM Reem Kayden Center 103

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid (class meets in person: also open to students studying remotely)

Class/room cap

22

 

  

What on Earth are humans supposed to eat? This question is often overlooked in critiques of industrial agriculture, yet nutrition science and evolutionary biology indicate that today’s food system—based on highly processed grains, soy, and seed oils—is implicated in the soaring rates of diabetes, heart disease, obesity, autoimmune disease, and even psychological disorders. Moreover, the industrialization of agriculture has accelerated environmental damage from soil erosion, nutrient loss, greenhouse gas emissions, water pollution, and deforestation. The widespread use of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers explains much of the increase in food production since 1950, as the human population has tripled. How many humans can extract a nutritious diet sustainably from a given land base? Globalization and rising concentration in agricultural production, food processing, and distribution have transformed food systems around the world.  The coronavirus pandemic has disproportionately affected migrant farm workers and meat processing plant employees, and has shut restaurants and dislocated supply chains. What are the obstacles to reforming food systems toward more sustainable and appropriate practices? We review the history, economics, and politics of food systems, with particular focus on United States policies. No prerequisites.

 

Course:

EUS 222  AIR

Professor:

Elias Dueker  

CRN:

14002

Schedule/Location:

Mon Th  2:00 PM5:00 PM Rose Laboratories 306

Distributional Area:

LS Laboratory Science

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid (class meets in person: also open to students studying remotely)

Class/room cap

20

Cross-listed:

Architecture; Biology

Recent global catastrophes including the Covid19 pandemic and unusually destructive wildfires have highlighted the importance of equitable access to clean air in human and ecological health. While air is the fluid humans engage with most intimately, we are not generally aware of whether or not the air we are interacting with is “clean.” Environmental racism in the US has resulted in an inequitable distribution of clean air, which has in turn given birth to the powerful movement for environmental justice. This class will be devoted to learning the scientific principles behind measuring and managing air quality on a local, regional, and global scale. We will be interacting with other Bard (OSUN) network institutions to think cross-disciplinarily and cross-nationally about the global nature of air “management” and to creatively address the scientific needs of local and regional community members working toward reducing air pollution. Lab work will be guided by scientific questions generated by communities including Kingston, NY and Bishkek, Kyrgysztan.  Specifically, students will manipulate models to conduct field sampling, and utilize microbiological and chemical assays in the lab to better understand sources for and tracking of contaminants in air and the implications for people breathing that air. This course is part of the Racial Justice Initiative, an interdisciplinary collaboration among students and faculty to further the understanding of racial inequality and injustice in the United States and beyond.

 

Course:

EUS 311  Climate and Agroecology

Professor:

Jennifer Phillips  

CRN:

14296

Schedule/Location:

 Mon Wed 10:20 AM11:40 AM Albee B102

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

Instructional Mode:

In Person

Class/room cap

5

 

 

In this course we examine the interactions between agroecosystems and climate.  With food and agriculture accounting for nearly a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions, we will explore the contrast between current food producing systems and the potential role agroecosystems could play in solutions to climate change through regenerative approaches.  This requires a deep dive into soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, alternative livestock management, and the role of perennials in food and fiber.  Students will read peer-reviewed science papers and complete a simulation modeling project.  Permission of the professor required.

 

Course:

EUS 339  Kingston Housing Lab

Professor:

Kwame Holmes  

CRN:

14072

Schedule/Location:

 Tue Fri 12:10 PM1:30 PM Olin 202

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

18

Cross-listed:

Architecture; Human Rights

This course-practicum will bring students into the ongoing work of the Kingston Housing Lab. This project combines critical geography with the politics and philosophy of prison abolition, bringing both to bear upon the struggle for housing justice in Kingston, New York and Ulster county. Students will engage latest academic literature on housing insecurity and evictions as an ongoing crisis in late-capitalism, receive training in ArcGIS, and participate in our efforts to repair relationships between tenants and landlords. Though a small town, Kingston, NY is in the midst of a housing crisis, one that has been exacerbated by COVID-19 and which is driven by the regional and global flow of capital into real estate in small towns near and far. Kingston Housing Lab students will have an opportunity to directly intervene in these issues at a critical juncture in global history.

 

Course:

EUS 407  Climate Science to Justice

Professor:

Robyn Smyth  

CRN:

14003

Schedule/Location:

  Wed   2:00 PM4:20 PM Stevenson Library 2nd floor

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

Instructional Mode:

In Person  

Class/room cap

10

Cross-listed:

Human Rights

In this senior seminar, we will critically evaluate historic data on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by country and sector along with projected impacts of climate change on food, energy, and water resources to demonstrate the uneven and inequitable distribution of climate drivers, risks, and social costs. We will estimate the contributions of proposed and enacted climate policies at the state, regional, and national levels to GHG reductions and compare them to the magnitude of GHG reductions recommended in scientific consensus documents. Students will write a final paper that utilizes data to demonstrate a climate injustice and support a policy solution.

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

Course:

ANTH 290  Archaeology of African American Farms and Gardens

Professor:

Christopher Lindner  

CRN:

13931

Schedule/Location:

Th  3:50 PM5:10 PM Rose Laboratories 108

Fri 2:00 PM5:00 PM Rose Laboratories 108

Distributional Area:

LS Laboratory Science

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

12

Cross-listed:

Africana Studies; American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Historical Studies

 

Course:

ANTH 291  Race and the Animal

Professor:

Yuka Suzuki  

CRN:

13933

Schedule/Location:

Mon Th  12:10 PM1:30 PM Olin 203

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)

Class/room cap

20

Cross-listed:

Africana Studies; American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

Course:

ANTH 324  Doing Ethnography

Professor:

Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins  

CRN:

13938

Schedule/Location:

 Tue  2:00 PM4:20 PM 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

Instructional Mode:

Online/Remote  

Class/room cap

15

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

Course:

ANTH 362  Climate Change, Culture Change

Professor:

Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins  

CRN:

13937

Schedule/Location:

  Wed   9:20 AM11:40 AM 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Online/Remote  

Class/room cap

12

Cross-listed:

Architecture; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies

 

Course:

ART 100 AC Digital I: Fabricated Landscapes

Professor:

Adriane Colburn

CRN:

14336

Schedule/Location:

 Wed  5:20 PM8:20 PM 

Distributional Area:

PA Practicing Arts

Instructional Mode:

Online/Remote  

Class/room cap

12

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies

 

Course:

ART 132  Art and Climate Change

Professor:

Ellen Driscoll  

CRN:

14150

Schedule/Location:

 Th  10:10 AM1:10 PM Fisher Studio Arts 141/161

Distributional Area:

PA Practicing Arts

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

10

Cross-listed:

Architecture; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

Course:

ARTH 145  Byzantine Art and Architecture

Professor:

Katherine Boivin  

CRN:

14104

Schedule/Location:

 Tue Fri 10:20 AM11:40 AM Campus Center Weis Cinema

Distributional Area:

AA Analysis of Art

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

20

Cross-listed:

Architecture; Environmental & Urban Studies; Medieval Studies; Middle Eastern Studies

 

Course:

ARTH 223  Wild Visions:Picturing Nature

Professor:

Susan Merriam  

CRN:

14106

Schedule/Location:

 Tue Fri 10:20 AM11:40 AM 

Distributional Area:

AA Analysis of Art

Instructional Mode:

Online/Remote  

Class/room cap

18

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies; Science, Technology, Society

 

Course:

ARTH 225  Art and Environment: Perspectives on Land, Landscape, and Ecology

Professor:

Julia Rosenbaum  

CRN:

14112

Schedule/Location:

  Wed Sat  2:00 PM3:20 PM Bard Chapel

Distributional Area:

AA Analysis of Art

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

18

Cross-listed:

American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities

 

Course:

ARTH 234  Of Utopias

Professor:

Olga Touloumi  

CRN:

14111

Schedule/Location:

  Wed Sat  2:00 PM3:20 PM Campus Center Weis Cinema

Distributional Area:

AA Analysis of Art

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

20

Cross-listed:

Architecture; Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities

 

Course:

BIO 202  Ecology and Evolution

Professor:

Bruce Robertson  

CRN:

13797

Schedule/Location:

 Tue Fri 8:30 AM11:30 AM Reem Kayden Center 114/115

Distributional Area:

LS Laboratory Science

Instructional Mode:

In Person  

Class/room cap

16

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies

 

Course:

ECON 203  Game Theory

Professor:

Aniruddha Mitra  

CRN:

13975

Schedule/Location:

Mon Th  10:20 AM11:40 AM Hegeman 102

Distributional Area:

MC Mathematics and Computing

Instructional Mode:

In Person  

Class/room cap

18

Cross-listed:

Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies

 

Course:

ECON 227  The Right to Employment

Professor:

Pavlina Tcherneva  

CRN:

13942

Schedule/Location:

 Tue Fri 12:10 PM1:30 PM 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Online/Remote  

Class/room cap

22

Cross-listed:

Africana Studies; American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Sociology

 

 

Course:

HIST 2308  China’s Environment

Professor:

Robert Culp  

CRN:

13994

Schedule/Location:

Mon Th  8:30 AM9:50 AM Hegeman 102

Distributional Area:

HA Historical Analysis

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid (class meets in person: also open to students studying remotely)

Class/room cap

19

Cross-listed:

Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies

 

Course:

HIST 2510  Environmental Histories of the Recent United States

Professor:

Jeannette Estruth  

CRN:

14047

Schedule/Location:

Mon Th  7:30 PM8:50 PM Olin 203

Distributional Area:

HA Historical Analysis

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

20

Cross-listed:

American Studies; Architecture; Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Political Studies

 

Course:

HIST 382  Re-Thinking Silicon Valley

Professor:

Jeannette Estruth  

CRN:

14082

Schedule/Location:

 Th  2:00 PM4:20 PM Olin 203

Distributional Area:

HA Historical Analysis

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid (class meets in person: also open to students studying remotely)

Class/room cap

15

Cross-listed:

American Studies; Architecture; Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Human Rights

 

Course:

HR 374  Beyond Colonial Distinctions: Concerning Human – Non-Human Allyship

Professor:

. TBA  

CRN:

13916

Schedule/Location:

 Tue  2:00 PM4:20 PM Hegeman 308

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

In Person  

Class/room cap

15

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies

 

Course:

LIT 2249  Trading Fictions of Empire in the Indian Ocean

Professor:

Elizabeth Holt  

CRN:

14017

Schedule/Location:

 Tue Fri 12:10 PM1:30 PM Olin 204

Distributional Area:

LA Literary Analysis in English

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

18

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies; Middle Eastern Studies

 

Course:

LIT 258  American Literature II: Democratic Vistas, Democratic Crises

Professor:

Elizabeth Frank  

CRN:

13995

Schedule/Location:

Mon Th  8:30 AM9:50 AM 

Distributional Area:

LA Literary Analysis in English

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Online/Remote  

Class/room cap

18

Cross-listed:

American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

Course:

LIT 259  American Literature III: What Does it Mean to Be Modern?

Professor:

Peter L’Official  

CRN:

13996

Schedule/Location:

 Tue  Th  12:10 PM1:30 PM Olin Lang Center 115

Distributional Area:

LA Literary Analysis in English

D+J Difference and Justice

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

15

Cross-listed:

American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

Course:

LIT 3251  Climate Fiction

Professor:

Daniel Williams  

CRN:

14031

Schedule/Location:

  Wed   2:00 PM4:20 PM

Distributional Area:

LA Literary Analysis in English

Instructional Mode:

Online/Remote

Class/room cap

15

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies

 

Course:

PS 2220  The Politics of Climate Change

Professor:

Kellan Anfinson  

CRN:

13875

Schedule/Location:

 Tue Fri 12:10 PM1:30 PM 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

Instructional Mode:

Online/Remote  

Class/room cap

22

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies

 

Course:

PS 314  Political Economy of Development

Professor:

Sanjib Baruah  

CRN:

13869

Schedule/Location:

Mon   2:00 PM4:20 PM 

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

Instructional Mode:

Online/Remote  

Class/room cap

15

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

Course:

SOC 231  The Environment and Society

Professor:

Peter Klein  

CRN:

13859

Schedule/Location:

 Tue Fri 10:20 AM11:40 AM Olin 202

Distributional Area:

SA Social Analysis

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid (class meets in person: also open to students studying remotely)

Class/room cap

18

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Science, Technology, Society

 

Course:

WRIT 231  Reading and Writing the Birds

Professor:

Susan Rogers  

CRN:

14089

Schedule/Location:

Mon   10:20 AM11:40 AM 

Distributional Area:

PA Practicing Arts

Instructional Mode:

Blended (class meets in person with some online components)  

Class/room cap

12

Cross-listed:

Environmental & Urban Studies