92115

EUS 101

 Intro Environ & Urban Studies

Monique Segarra

 T Th 10:20 am-11:40 am

AVERY 110

SA

Humans have profoundly altered the character of Earth’s biosphere since the advent of agriculture and urbanization 10,000 years ago. This course explores how global problems such as climate disruption, species extinction, and depletion of fossil soils, fuels, and waters are interlinked with one another but also with social problems such as financial instability, widening economic inequality, food insecurity, intensifying conflict and militarization, and declining public health. We review the empirical evidence of major environmental problems; consider which academic disciplines and practical skills are required to tackle them; and contemplate alternative political options open to governments and communities. Issues will be considered at a variety of scales—from the level of individual responsibility to the local, regional, national, and global dimensions. EUS 101 and 102 are the foundational courses of the EUS program and are required for moderation. No prerequisite.

Class size: 20

 

92116

EUS 102

 Intro: Enviro System Science

Robyn Smyth

M       2:00 pm-3:20 pm

   W    2:00 pm-5:00 pm

OLIN 203

ROSE 306

LS

The science needed to understand and address our complex socio-environmental challenges comes from a broad range of disciplines. In this course, we introduce and integrate core concepts and methodologies from physical, biological, and social sciences and practice systems thinking to build your capacity to think critically about the causes and solutions to complex environmental problems and sustainability challenges. We will develop a mechanistic understanding of the drivers of climate change and the consequences for ecological processes, water resources, and agriculture. We will learn about and practice the scientific method as we study the air, land, water, and waste around campus.

The course goals are to (1) develop your capacity for systems thinking about social and environmental problems, (2) understand and think critically about the role of science and scientists in society, (3) practice the scientific method and understand its strengths and weaknesses in the context of environmental sciences, and (4) improve your mechanistic understanding of the climate system, watershed processes, waste fate & transport and other core environmental science concepts.

Class size: 21

 

92125

EUS 221

 Water

Elias Dueker

 

 T Th 2:00 pm-5:00 pm

HEG 106/ ROSE 306

LS

This course offers a detailed exploration of the earth's hydrosphere and its interactions with the biosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere. Topics will include origins of the hydrosphere, origins of life, the global hydrologic cycle, and anthropogenic influences on aquatic ecosystems. We will further explore pressing global environmental issues associated with the hydrosphere: climate change, protection of drinking water resources, freshwater and marine ecosystem degradation, and waste water treatment. Lab work will be guided by scientific questions related to these issues, and will focus on detection of anthropogenic influence, management and maintenance of water resources, and frontiers of scientific approaches to sustainable human interactions with water resources.   Labs will include field sampling, lab analysis, and computer modeling to improve understanding of the ecological ramifications of water pollution in marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems. Prerequisites: EUS 102, Bio 202, or permission of instructor.

Class size: 16

 

92556

EUS 305E

Social Entrepreneurship Practicum

Alejandro Crawford

 

M  W  8:30 am-9:50 am

BARRINGER 104

SA

Cross-listed: Economics

This is a collaborative, cross-institution course in social entrepreneurship designed for undergraduates, where student teams ideate and develop models for social enterprises. Social entrepreneurship is the process of building new organizations that offer scalable solutions to social and environmental challenges. Social enterprise can be either for-profit, or non-profit, but key is the ambition to address societal problems at scale. The practice of social entrepreneurship explores the full suite of liberal learning: critical analysis, persuasive writing, oral communication, quantitative reasoning, design thinking, and group social dynamics. Bard students will engage with classes from AUCA, AQB, CEU and Earth University, through a mixture of synchronous on-line learning, and in-person labs. The course will culminate in a “shark tank for sustainability” among and between teams from the different universities, with winning teams then competing at the Bard MBA’s annual Disrupt to Sustain pitch competition in December. The teaching and learning collaboration will be made possible through the use of Bard MBA Professor Crawford’s cloud-based teaching tool, RebelBase, which supports project-based learning embedded in a collaborative, online entrepreneurial ecosystem. The course will include readings and discussion focused on social issues related to entrepreneurship: drivers of change, from decarbonization to AI; delinking growth from material throughput; urban-based innovation ecosystems; social obstacles to risk taking; working on multi-disciplinary teams; language, power and gender dynamics in entrepreneurship; deconstructing the archetypes of entrepreneurship. Prerequisite: Economics 100

Class size: 16

 

92543

EUS 309

 EUS Colloquium / Practicum: Environmental Justice: Art, Science, and Radical Cartography

Elias Dueker

Krista Caballero

 T Th 5:40 pm-7:00 pm

EXPERIMENTAL HUMANITIES TENT

SA

Cross-listed: American Studies, Experimental Humanities, Human Rights,

We generally assume maps are objective, accurate representations of data and the world around us when, in fact, they depict the knowledge, experience, and values of the humans who draft them. As a hybrid EUS practicum + colloquium, this course will explore ways in which ecological issues are entangled with colonial histories of racism and supremacy, resource extraction and expansion through mapping. Native American scholarship will ground our exploration as we consider the impact and consequences of mapping as a tool used historically to claim ownership and invite exploitation. We will also investigate the evolution of radical cartography to counter these practices and imagine alternative mapping for more just ecological futures. A series of Indigenous scholars and activists will provide an opportunity for students to learn from experts working at the forefront of their fields to address environmental injustices locally, nationally, and internationally. These guest lectures will be paired with hands-on projects that explore mapping as a tool for environmental advocacy alongside artistic and counter-mapping approaches that experiment with ways we might communicate scientific and humanistic knowledge to a wider audience. In both theory and practice this team-taught course aims to reconsider and transform ways of engaging community science and community action through collaborative inquiry, interdisciplinary experimentation, and meaningful cross-cultural dialogue.

 Class size: 15

 

92120

EUS 405

 Environmental Policy I

Monique Segarra

 T Th 1:30 pm-3:00 pm

OLIN 308

SA

During this course, students analyze the political forces that impact the policy making process and the legal and regulatory instruments that have been developed to protect the environment and human health. The class provides a political framework to capture the dynamic and complex relationships between these and other critical factors − scientific, economic, cultural, institutional and ethical − that influence how society responds to environmental problems from the local to international levels. In addition, this class will help us track and navigate the larger political context that has provided openings for the modern environmental movement to emerge in the United States during the 1960s, and the advancement and retrenchment of environmental law and policies over time. The analytic framework that we use to help us think systematically across complex policy issues/arenas and over time is built on the inter-related concepts of ideas, interests and institutions. One of the primary goals of this course is to enable you to approach any environmental issue and to make sense of it by using this frame analysis. For example, what are the dominant (and often contentious) ideas about what constitutes a policy issue or a policy problem to be solved? Who are the critical actors or interest groups that shape both a definition of the problem and its solution, or who can support or block a policy/program during its implementation? What are the kinds of institutional factors that shape policy formation and implementation –from federalism in the United States or Mexico, to bureaucratic rules, national laws and political venues such as congress, state legislatures, local government, bureaucratic agencies or cultural beliefs -to name only a few!

Class size: 5

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

92562

ARCH 121

 Design Studio-Seminar 1: Planetary

Ross Adams

T    10:20 am-1:20pm

   Th 10:30am-12:30pm

HDRANX 106

PA

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies, Experimental Humanities

 

92305

ARTH 126

 Situating Architecture: Modernisms

Olga Touloumi

  W F 3:50 pm-5:10 pm

OLIN 102

AA

Cross-listed: Architecture; Environmental & Urban Studies Class size: 22

 

92239

LIT 3028

 Soundscapes of American Lit.

Alexandre Benson

    F    2:00 pm-4:20 pm

OLIN 303

LA

Cross-listed: American Studies; Experimental Humanities, Environmental & Urban Studies Class size: 15

 

92318

ARTH 307

 Contested Spaces

Olga Touloumi

   Th 5:40 pm-8:00 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

Cross-listed: Architecture; Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights Class size: 15

 

92234

LIT 3233

 American Study

Peter L'Official

  W    2:00 pm-4:20 pm

HEG 300

LA

Cross-listed: Architecture; American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies Class size: 12

 

92006

BIO 157

 Food Microbiology

Gabriel Perron

 T Th 8:30 am-11:30 am

RKC 111/112

LS

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities Class size: 16

 

92008

BIO 202

 Ecology and Evolution

Bruce Robertson

  W F 8:30 am-11:30 am

RKC 114/115

LS

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies Class size: 16

 

92009

BIO 244

 Biostatistics

Gabriel Perron

 T Th 2:00 pm-4:00 pm

RKC 103

MC

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global Public Health; Mathematics Class size: 16

92016

BIO 308

 Plant Ecology

Cathy Collins

  W     3:50 pm-4:50 pm

F        9:00 am-11:40 am

F        12:10 pm-3:40 pm

RKC 200

RKC 102

RKC 111/112

LS

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies Class size: 16

 

92117

PHYS 124

 Climate Change

Gidon Eshel

M  W  10:20 am-11:40 am

RKC 103

LS

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies Class size: 30

 

92093

ANTH 211

 Ancient Peoples before the Bard Lands: Archaeological methods and theory

Christopher Lindner

   Th   3:50 pm-5:10 pm

      F  2:00 pm-5:00 pm

HEG 300

ROSE 108

LS

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies Class size: 12

 

92087

ANTH 218

 The Rift and the Nile: History, Culture and the Natural World in Eastern Africa

John Ryle

M  W  12:10 pm-1:30 pm

HEG 201

SA

D+J

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Historical Studies; Human Rights Class size: 20

 

92088

ANTH 351

 The Interview – In ethnographic research, oral history, human rights, journalism, literature and film

John Ryle

 T       10:20 am-12:40 pm

HEG 106

SA

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights Class size: 15

 

92199

BGIA 301

 The Core Seminar:  Non-State Actors in International Affairs

Elmira Bayrasli

          -

 

SA

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies Class size: 18

 

92101

ECON 114

 Economics for Planet Earth

Kris Feder

 T Th 12:10 pm-1:30 pm

ALBEE 106

SA

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies Class size: 22

 

92107

ECON 229

 Introduction to Econometrics

Sanjaya DeSilva

 T Th 2:00 pm-3:20 pm

ALBEE 106

MC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies Class size: 0

 

92108

ECON 242

 Ecological Economics

Kris Feder

M  W  3:50 pm-5:10 pm

ALBEE 106

SA

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies Class size: 22

 

92111

ECON 319

 Developing Cities

Sanjaya DeSilva

  W     2:00 pm-4:20 pm

HDR 106

SA

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies Class size: 12

 

92128

HIST 145

 The Business of Drugs in America

Jeannette Estruth

 T Th 5:40 pm-7:00 pm

OLIN 202

HA

D+J

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Political Studies; Science, Technology, Society Class size: 22

 

92129

HIST 161

 History of Technology and Economy: The Era of Hydrocarbon Economy

Gregory Moynahan

 T Th 8:30 am-9:50 am

OLIN 202

HA

D+J

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Science, Technology, Society Class size: 22

 

92121

HIST 193

 From the New Deal to the Green New Deal: Liberalism and Conservatism in the United States

Jeannette Estruth

 T Th 3:50 pm-5:10 pm

OLIN 205

HA

D+J

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Political Studies Class size: 22

 

92190

 

SOC 138

 Introduction to Urban Sociology

Peter Klein

 T Th     12:10 pm-1:30 pm

HEG 204

SA

Cross-listed: Architecture; Environmental & Urban Studies; American Studies Class size: 22

 

92193

SOC 205 A

 Intro to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

 T Th 12:10 pm-1:30 pm

HDR 106

MC

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights Class size: 15

 

92194

SOC 205 B

 Intro to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

 T Th 3:50 pm-5:10 pm

HDR 101A

MC

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights Class size: 15

 

92197

SOC 361

 Writing Environmental Justice

Peter Klein

  W     2:00 pm-4:20 pm

OLIN 302

SA

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights Class size: 12