Bard in China Program
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Planned and Upcoming Events

Every Wednesday

Chinese Table

Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!
Kline Commons, Committee Room
5:30–7:00 p.m.

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Past Events

Bard-Levy Master of Science in Economic Theory and Policy Open House

Monday, September 16, 2013
The Levy Institute of Economics is starting it's Master of Science in Economic Theory and Policy program from the Fall of 2014. The program emphasizes theoretical and empirical aspects of policy analysis through specialization in one of four Levy Institute research areas: macroeconomic theory, policy, and modeling; monetary policy and financial structure; distribution of income, wealth, and well-being, including gender equality and time poverty; and employment and labor markets.

The Master of Science program draws on the expertise of an extensive network of scholars at the Levy Economics Institute, a policy research think tank with more than 25 years of economic theory and public policy research. During the two-year M.S. program, students are required to participate in a graduate research assistantship carried out by Levy Institute scholars and faculty. Undergraduates in economics or related fields have an opportunity, through a 3+2 program, to earn both a B.A. and the M.S. in five years.

Bard Abroad Information Session

Monday, September 16, 2013
Thinking of going abroad? Join Study Abroad Advisor Trish Fleming, Associate Vice President and Dean of Studies David Shein, Bard Abroad staff, and recent program participants to discuss everything you ever wanted to know about studying abroad, from petitions and program selection to life and academics in-country, especially regarding Bard's exciting partner institutions in Germany, Hungary, Kyrgyzstan, Palestine, and Russia.

James Clarke Chace Memorial Speaker Series

Thursday, September 12, 2013
LTC Tania Chacho

Academy Professor, Department of Social Studies. United States Military Academy at West Point

Research in China Panel by Students on the Fulbright-Hays GPA Summer Grant Program

Friday, November 11, 2011
4:00pm, Olin 102

Bard College to Host Lecture on Gender Equality in Islam on Thursday, April 23

Thursday, April 23, 2009

ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON, NY — On Thursday, April 23, Nina Nurmila, a Fulbright Visiting Professor at the University of Redlands in California, will speak at Bard College. Her talk, “Gender Equality in Islam,” is being by arranged by the South East Asian Studies Consortium of the Hudson Valley (SEASCOHV) and is supported by the Fulbright Foundation. The event is free and open to the public and takes place at 4:30 p.m. in room 205 of the Olin Humanities Building.

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Free Music from Japan Concert, March 10

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

On Tuesday, March 10, Music from Japan—the leading presenter of Japanese traditional and contemporary music in the United States—will give a free concert at Bard College as part of its 2009 American tour.

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Bard College to Host Lecture on Impact of Financial Crisis on Developing World

Friday, January 30, 2009
On Friday, January 30, Bard in China presents a lecture by Thomas B. Pepinsky, an assistant professor in the Department of Government at Cornell University. Pepinsky will discuss the impact of the global financial crisis on politics in the developing world, drawing some parallels and distinctions between the current global financial crisis and the Asian financial crisis of the late 1990s.
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A Concert for CHIME

Saturday, October 18, 2008
A chamber concert of contemporary works by Chinese composers, organized by The Bard College Conservatory of Music for a conference at Bard College of CHIME: European Foundation For Chinese Music Research.
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CHIME Conference and Concerts

Thursday, October 16, 2008 – Sunday, October 19, 2008
CONCERTS HIGHLIGHT FOUR-DAY CONFERENCE AT BARD COLLEGE ON MUSIC AND RITUAL IN CHINA AND EAST ASIA, OCTOBER 16–19
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Documentary Film Screening and Panel Discussion

Tuesday, April 29, 2008
Manufacturing Miracles Explores Mazda Automobile Company in Hiroshima, Japan, During the Oil Crisis in the Mid 1970s
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Japanese Printmaking Lecture

Saturday, March 15, 2008
On Saturday, March 15, Bard in China presents “Japanese Prints from Ukiyoe to the Modern Day,” a lecture and demonstration by renowned Japanese printmaker Akira Kurosaki. The lecture features a slideshow and discussion focusing on Japanese woodblock printmaking as exemplified in 18th- and 19th-century ukiyoe prints. Kurosaki will also explore how European printmaking from the early twentieth century inspired Japanese printmakers to develop new techniques. The lecture will examine the works of eight to ten representative printmakers of the twentieth century and discuss their techniques and modes of expression. Kurosaki will also display his own works and demonstrate the printmaking process. Actual examples of old prints and the stages of the printing process will be on display. The event, which is sponsored by Bard in China and Bard’s Studio Art Program, is free and open to the public and takes place at 3 p.m. in Weis Cinema in the Bertelsmann Campus Center.
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Beyond Between: Translation, Ghosts, Metaphors

Monday, March 3, 2008
BARD IN CHINA PRESENTS LECTURE ON TRANSLATION ON MARCH 3 ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON, NY — On Monday, March 3, Bard in China will present “Beyond Between: Translation, Ghosts, Metaphors,” a lecture by Michael Emmerich, who has been a Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow at the Princeton Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts since the fall of 2007. He will be speaking on the metaphorics of translation and his experiences as a translator of contemporary Japanese fiction. The event is free and open to the public and begins at 6 p.m. in Olin 102. The event is presented by Bard in China and the Japanese language program. Emmerich has a Ph.D. and an M.A./M.Phil in Japanese literature from Columbia University, an M.A. in classical Japanese literature from Ristumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan, and an undergraduate degree from Princeton University. He has published, among other works, The Apprenticeship of Big Toe P, a translation of Matsuura Rieko's Oyayubi P no shugyo jidai (forthcoming from Seven Stories Press); Hardboiled & Hard Luck, a translation of Yoshimoto Banana's Haadoboirudo/Haadorakku (2005); Vibrator, a translation of Akasaka Miri's Vaibureeta (2005); Sayonara, Gangsters, a translation of Takahashi Gen'ichiro's Sayonara, gyangutachi (2004); and Goodbye Tsugumi, a translation of Yoshimoto Banana's TUGUMI (2002). For more information on the event, contact Katherine Gould-Martin, gould@bard.edu, 845-758-7388.

Bard in China Film Screening

Tuesday, February 5, 2008

“Vietnamese Cinema: Past, Present, and Future.” Screening of The Owl and the Sparrow (2007), with presentation by director Stephane Gauger.

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Bard in China Film Screening

Monday, February 4, 2008

“Vietnamese Cinema: Past, Present, and Future.” Lecture by Gerald Herman, founder of Hanoi Cinematheque, followed by screening of When the Tenth Moon Comes (1984), directed by Dang Nhat Minh.

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"Vietnamese Cinema: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow" Gerald Herman

Monday, February 4, 2008 – Tuesday, February 5, 2008
Films will be shown. More details later.

Chinese Table

Tuesday, December 25, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, December 18, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, December 11, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, December 4, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, November 27, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, November 20, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

"Fine Rain: Politics and Folk Songs in China", a documentary by Meera Jaffrey

Tuesday, November 13, 2007
The filmmaker will talk about making her film. Presented by Asian Studies and Music. In Jaffrey’s powerful documentary, “Fine Rain: Politics and folk songs in China”, she traces the different eras of modern China, from pre-Communism to the Cultural Revolution through archival film, photographs, footage of live performances and interviews with a cast of seven characters. In Shanghai, she meets Professor Wang, who poignantly recalls the brutal Japanese invasion. Through tears, he sings the songs that sustained him. Lady Fen, a retired performer, sings us songs that the refugee children sang to ease the pain of separation from their parents during the Japanese occupation. The proud Dr. Chow whole heartedly believed in the goals of Mao and the Communist Party, and even renounced the values of his own educated family. He speaks of joining a revolutionary choir that sang throughout China. In the end, Dr Chow was betrayed by his own idealism, as the songs he sings take on a bitter infliction.

Chinese Table

Tuesday, November 13, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, November 6, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, October 30, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, October 23, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, October 16, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Guest Lecture: Dr. A.T. Ariyaratne

Friday, October 12, 2007
A former schoolteacher with a spirit for social activism, Dr. A. T. Ariyaratne is the founder of Sri Lanka’s largest grassroots people’s movement, Sarvodaya. Now approaching its 50th year, the organization, which is centered on Buddhist-Gandhian philosophy, continues its dedication to non-violence, peace, and the sustainable empowerment of people. With an estimated 11 million beneficiaries island-wide, the country’s largest micro-credit agency, groundbreaking projects in biodiversity, solar energy and rehabilitation, and over one-hundred thousand youth mobilized for peace building, Sarvodaya promotes respect for the land and the human spirit in the midst of Sri Lanka’s brutal civil war. Recipient of the Gandhi Peace Prize (India), the Niwano Peace Prize (Japan), the Alan Shawn Feinstein World Hunger Award (USA), and nominated for the Nobel Prize, Dr. A. T. Ariyaratne will speak at Bard College as a part of a national U.S. tour.

Chinese Table

Tuesday, October 9, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, October 2, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, September 25, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, September 18, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Chinese Table

Tuesday, September 11, 2007
Come and listen, speak. Come if you are studying Chinese or you are Chinese or if you can at all speak Chinese. If you are a student not on the meal plan, you will be provided with a coupon for a free lunch - but you must eat it at Chinese table!

Japanese "Literature in Film" Series: Tony Takitani

Friday, May 4, 2007
Tony Takitani, directed by by Ichikawa Jun, 2004. A discussion with the director follows the screening.

Distinguished director Jun Ichikawa brings us his screen adaptation of Haruki Murakami's short story "Tony Takitani." While Murakami is known for being reluctant to allow his writing to be adapted into films, Ichikawa's minimalist style reflects Murakami's writing style perfectly and creates a world that at the same time encompasses great sympathy and distance.
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Japanese "Literature in Film" Series: Kwaidan

Friday, April 27, 2007
Film Screening: Kwaidan, directed by Kobayashi Masaki, 1964.

This classic film from director Kobayashi Masaki is loosely based on Lafcadio Hearn's book of traditional ghost stories of the same name. With its haunting and beautiful presentation of four separate tales, this film received a special jury prize at the 1965 Cannes Film Festival.
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Bard in China Lectures

Monday, February 26, 2007
“China: On the Way to Becoming a Techno-Superpower?” Denis Fred Simon, provost and vice president for academic affairs of the Levin Graduate Institute of International Relations and Commerce. Cosponsored by Program in Global and International Studies and Program in Science, Technology, and Society.

PIPA VIRTUOSO ZHOU YI TO PERFORM FREE CONCERT

Wednesday, April 19, 2006
On Wednesday, April 19, Bard College welcomes virtuoso musician Zhou Yi for a recital on the pipa, the Chinese four-stringed plucked lute, and the qin seven-stringed zither. She will be accompanied by Miao Yimin on the xiao and di bamboo flutes. The performance is free and open to the public and takes place at 7 p.m. in Bard Hall on the Bard College campus. The concert is sponsored by Bard in China and the Bard College Music Program, with support from the Freeman Undergraduate Asian Studies Initiative.
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Bard In China Lecture, April 11

Tuesday, April 11, 2006
Bard in China to Host Lecture on April 11 about Life in a Chinese Factory City
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Bard In China Lecture

Tuesday, April 4, 2006
Bard in China to Host Lecture on Consumerism in 1930s China on Tuesday, April 4. Columbia University professor Eugenia Lean will present “Global Commodity, Local Desire: Creating a Need for Lux Soap in 1930s China.” The lecture is presented by Bard in China and Bard’s Asian Studies Program, with support from the Freeman Undergraduate Asian Studies Initiative. The lecture is free and open to the public, and take place from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. in room 115 of the Olin Language Center on the Bard College campus.
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Bard In China to Host Lecture and Screening

Wednesday, March 15, 2006
Bard In China to Host Lecture and Screening of The Film The Goddess on Wednesday, March 15
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Performance: Thousand Years Waiting

Monday, March 6, 2006
Thousand Years Waiting, written by Bard professor Chiori Miyagawa. A unique trans-Pacific collaboration featuring storytelling, dance, and puppetry. Original music by Bruce Odland, dramaturgy by Debra Cardona, direction and choreography by Sonoko Kawahara. With traditional Japanese Otome Bunraku puppet artist Masaya Kiritake and professional American actors Margie Douglas, Sophia Skiles, and Anna Wilson. Please contact the Box Office at 845 758-7948 for more information about tickets to this performance.

Bard in China Lecture Dec. 8 at 4:30 p.m.

Thursday, December 8, 2005
On Thursday, December 8, art historian Francois Louis will present a lecture on artifacts from the Liao dynasty. His talk, “Unearthing the Liao Dynasty,” takes place at 4:30 p.m. in room 115 of the Olin Language Center. The talk, which is free and open to the public, is presented by Bard in China, with support from the Freeman Undergraduate Asian Studies Initiative.
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Joshua Muldavin, "From Rural Transformation to Global Integration: the Real Story about China's Rise to Superpower"

Thursday, November 17, 2005
Joshua Muldavin is currently Henry R. Luce Professor of Asian Studies and Human Geography at Sarah Lawrence College, and is former Chair and Director of International Development Studies at UCLA. He has conducted research in China for over 20 years, and is currently writing a book on the social and environmental impacts of China's reforms and global integration.

Bard in China Lecture, Nov. 17

Thursday, November 17, 2005
BARD IN CHINA TO HOST LECTURE ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF CHINA’S ECONOMIC SUCCESS ON THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17
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Elizabeth Economy, "The Rise of Chinese Power"

Thursday, November 10, 2005
(NB: This event is in New York City, the Bard Globalization and International Affairs Program, 6;15, Bard Hall, 410 W. 58th St, NY, NY 10019. www.bard.edu/bgia. RSVP (required!): cristol@bard.edu.

Dan Shao, "Chinese by Definition: The Making and Practice of Nationality Law, 1909-1980"

Tuesday, November 8, 2005
Dan Shao, Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will present a lecture called "Chinese by Definition: The Making and Practice of Nationality Law, 1909-1980" Before 1909, no one in the Qing Empire could answer one of the most frequently asked questions about one's identity nowadays: what is your nationality (guoji)? The Qing court issued the first Chinese law of nationality in 1909. There have been numerous versions of this law, all based on the principle of Jus sanguinis, which was translated "xuetong zhuyi" (the right of blood)., Despite all the changes in the law, the principle of Jus sanguinis has remained unchanged. How did the Chinese interpret "the right of blood"? What can we learn from the practice of Jus sanguinis about the subjectivity and objectivity of the imagined national blood lineage? Examining actual cases when Nationality Law was applied reveals that the national blood lineage idea, though imagined, has been applied as objective, and has defined Chinese identity legally with concrete consequences that still have impact on historical borderlanders in Taiwan, Hongkong, and Macau at the turn of this century.

Bard In China Lecture, Nov. 8

Tuesday, November 8, 2005
BARD IN CHINA TO HOST LECTURE ON 20th CENTURY CHINESE NATIONAL LAWS ON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8
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Lecture/Demonstration: Japanese Shakuhachi Flute

Thursday, October 27, 2005
Ronnie Nyogetsu Reishin Seldin offers a lecture/demonstration of the shakuhachi, the Japanese bamboo flute. Ronnie Nyogetsu Reishin Seldin has performed in numerous concerts, lectures, and demonstrations in the metropolitan New York area and around the United States as well as in Canada, Mexico, Scotland, and Argentina.

Panel on Arts of Japan: Kuniyoshi et al and Shomyo to Onkyo

Thursday, October 20, 2005
Tom Wolf, will present "Researching Asian-American Artists in Japan". Half travelogue, half art history lecture, this presentation will recount experiences of researching Asian American artists in Japan, as well as demonstrating why this is an exciting new area of study.

Richard Teitelbaum will present "Travels in Japanese Music from Ancient to Avant Garde". In keeping with the concept of my planned course on the Music of Japan, I attended concerts, rehearsals and classes, and had personal meetings with a wide range of composers and performers. These ranged from observing classes and rehearsals by Buddhist monks practicing ancient shomyo chants at the beautiful mountain temple Hasedera near Nara, a performance of traditional and contemporary gagaku court music at a concert in Shizuoka, and an evening of Noh and Kyogen and the National Noh Theater in Tokyo, to a concert by leading avant-garde composer and performer Yuji Takahashi and others at the famous Tokyo "Live House" the Pit Inn. The talk will be illustrated by "home" videotapes of the trip, display of several traditional instruments and recorded examples of several of the genres investigated.

Teitelbaum and Wolf received received small travel grants from the Freeman Undergraduate Asian Studies Initiative to develop new courses.

Composer/performer Richard Teitelbaum is well known for his pioneering work in live electronic music, and his early explorations of intercultural improvisation and composition. He has been a founder of many music groups, combining electronic music with intercultural improvisation in groups such as Musica Elettronica Viva (MEV) and World Band. He has studied, recorded, and composed Japanese music. Currently working on Z'vi, an opera about the false Messiah, excerpts of which have been performed at Bard, in Venice, and in New York, he is a Professor of Music at Bard College.

Tom Wolf is Professor of Art History at Bard College. He has written extensively about 20th century American art, including studies of the art colony in Woodstock, New York, and the Arts and Crafts movement in the United States. His work on the painter, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, one of the most esteemed artists in the United States in the 1930s and 1940s, has led him to the broader study of Asian American artists in general.

Panel: Arts in Japan

Thursday, October 20, 2005
Bard in China will gather a panel of scholars to discuss arts in Japan. "Bard Professors Study Arts in Japan: Kuniyoshi and Shomyo to Onkyo," includes a discussion and slide show by music professor Richard Teitelbaum, exploring a wide range of his experiences with Japanese music, and a discussion by art history professor Tom Wolf of his work researching Asian American artists in Japan.
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Panel: "Tibetan Sacred Landscapes and the Constitution of Place in the Sino-Tibetan Borderlands"

Wednesday, October 19, 2005
Christopher Coggins, Simon's Rock College of Bard, will present "Sacred Landscape as Text: Sacred Forests, Sacred Mountains, and Exegesis in Tibetan Communities of NW Yunnan." In Tibetan communities of northwest Yunnan province, sacred mountains, forests, and ponds have survived decades of state-led industrialization and ideological regimentation, and they continue to define cultural identity and sense of place. A village case study outlines points of conflict and cooperation between tourists' desires for immersion in a mythologized paradise and local peoples' goals for establishing greater economic and cultural autonomy. Multiple possible "readings" of village landscapes through time point to "exegetical" traditions - the rereading of ancient "texts" in order to place the present and draft the future. Local acts of (re)interpretation create new epistemological spaces for sacrality, tourism, modernity, and Tibetan cultural politics in and beyond China.

Li-hua Ying, Bard College, will present "When Tibet Beckons". Since the 1980s, Chinese writers and artists began to arrive in Tibet to find inspiration for their own work. Ma Lihua, a woman who lived in Lhasa for more than twenty years, and Wen Pulin, an artist and art critic from Beijing who has made frequent trips to the region, are the focus of this talk. Both have written extensively about Tibet and its people. This talk is a report on an on-going course-development project. Li-hua Ying will talk about the trip she made to Tibet in summer ‘05 and the experience she had in relation to the writings of Ma and Wen.

Coggins and Ying received small travel grants from the Freeman Undergraduate Asian Studies Initiative to develop new courses.

Li-hua Ying is an Associate Professor of Chinese language and literature with special interests in contemporary Chinese and Taiwanese literature, Chinese minority literature, and Chinese calligraphy. She has done translations of modern Chinese poetry and written about twentieth century Chinese fiction and women calligraphers. She teaches Chinese language, literature, and culture courses at Bard.

Christopher Reed Coggins is an Associate Professor of Geography and Asian Studies Simon's Rock College of Bard. His dissertation, now a book (in the Bard library) is "The Tiger and the Pangolin: Cultural Ecology, Landscape Ecology, and Nature Conservation in China's Southeast Uplands". His research interests include Political Ecology, Nature Conservation, Cultural Geography, Plant and Animal Habitat Restoration, Globalization Theory, Environmental Governance, Environmental History, Cultural Ecology, Biogeography, Protected Area Issues, Environmental Perception, Sustainable Development, the Social Construction of Nature, Landscape Ecology, China, East and Southeast Asia. He has led student research trips in Vermont and China.

Panel Discussion: Sacred Landscapes of Tibet

Wednesday, October 19, 2005
+“Panel on Tibet: The Meaning of Sacred Landscapes,” will include presentations on the impact of the Tibetan landscape on Chinese artists and writers, and a talk on the ways sacred landscapes continue to define cultural identity and sense of place after decades of state-led industrialization and ideological regimentation. Li-Hua Ying, associate professor of Chinese at Bard, will discuss “When Tibet Beckons." Christopher Reed Coggins, associate professor of geography and Asian studies at Simon’s Rock College of Bard, will present “Tibetan Sacred Landscapes and the Constitution of Place in the Sino-Tibetan Borderlands.”
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Workshop and Discussion: "Managing Multiple Ecosystem Services"

Wednesday, October 19, 2005
Invitation to the Institute for Ecosystem Studies for "Managing Multiple Ecosystem Services", a Workshop and Discussion with US-China Exchange Members. RSVP to cep@bard.edu.

Midori Yoshimoto, "Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York."

Friday, October 14, 2005
A writer on popular arts, brought by Tom Wolf.

Lecture: Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York, 1955-75

Friday, October 14, 2005
“Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York, 1955-75,” a lecture by art historian Midori Yoshimoto, looks at Japanese women performance artists in the 1960s and 1970s, including Yayoi Kusama and Yoko Ono.
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Xiangui KANG , "Digital Watermarking and Multimedia Security"

Thursday, September 1, 2005
Professor Xiangui KANG, Associate Professor, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China, Visiting Scholar, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology. Sponsored by the Computer Science Program and Bard in China.

Bard in China Panel: Research on Labor in Asia

Wednesday, April 20, 2005
Panel of graduating seniors and alumnae to discuss labor in Asia: Rubaba Ali, Sau Pan Amy Chau, and Jonathan Greenblatt. The panel will include presentations on the bargaining power of Bangladeshi women, interprovincial migration in rural China, and China’s “floating population.”
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Coming to Terms with the Nation: Toward a History of Ethnic Classification in Twentieth-Century China

Thursday, April 14, 2005
Lecture by Thomas Shawn Mullaney, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, Columbia University, on the process, particularly in Yunnan, China's southwestern mountain area, by which hundreds of ethnic groups were reclassified into fifty-five.
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Bard in China Panel on Arts in Asia: Seeing Traditional Asian Arts Through Contemporary Eyes

Monday, April 11, 2005
Panel: Erica JiahuaYao (architecture, China): Ying Xian Liu (Winnie)(Tang Dynasty attire, China); Lela Chapman (dance, Bali). Chaired by Chiori Miyagawa also a presenter (theater, Japan).
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Lecture on Heifer International's Work in China

Saturday, March 19, 2005
Talk is Cosponsored by MooCow, a Heifer International Club Run by Bard Students. Lecture by Meng Zeng, formerly from China’s Heifer Project International headquarters in Chengdu, Sichuan, now a Ford Foundation International Fellow at Brandeis University’s Sustainable International Development Program at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management.

Development From The Ground Up: Lessons From The Past And Implications For Post-Tsunami Reconstruction in Sri Lanka

Thursday, March 17, 2005
A lecture by Sanjay DeSilva, assistant professor of economics at Bard. He will contrast bottom-up (grassroots empowerment) development thinking to the top-down (state-led policies focused on growth etc.) philosophies that have guided Sri Lanka since the colonial times. He will describe some bottom-up successes of Sarvodaya and micro credit programs, some political repercussions of the post-tsunami situation, and ways in which civil society (including Bard) could encourage individuals and organizations that are rebuilding their lives in ways that are in tune with their ecological and cultural environments.
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Unsettling Accounts: The Trial of the Gang of Four and the Cultural Logic of Late Socialism in China, 1978-1981

Wednesday, March 9, 2005
A lecture by Alexander Culpepper Cook, a Ph.D. candidate in History and East Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University, on the political trials of the Gang of Four in the aftermath of the Cultural Revolution.
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Lecture on Foreign Direct Investment in China

Tuesday, March 1, 2005
A lecture by Luodan Xu, economist and vice president, Lingnan (University) College, Sun Yatsen University. Presented by Levy Institute and Bard in China.
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Conservatory Concerts and Lectures

Wednesday, January 26, 2005
“Musicians from the Beijing Central Conservatory of Music.” Cosponsored by the Bard College Conservatory of Music and Bard in China.

Screening of Morning Sun (2003), a Documentary Narrative of China’s Cultural Revolution

Monday, November 15, 2004
The film will be introduced by Bard political science professor Nara Dillon and will be followed by a discussion with one of the filmmakers, Carma Hinton. Written and directed and produced by Hinton, Richard Gordon, and Geremie R. Barmé.
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Lecture on "China as the Next Global Superpower"

Thursday, October 14, 2004
Dr. Andrew Scobell of the Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College, and Dickinson College, is a Specialist on Asia-Pacific security.

Lecture: "The Stigmatization of Leprosy in Late Imperial China: Contagion, Sex, & Black Magic"

Tuesday, April 20, 2004
" The Stigmatization of Leprosy in Late Imperial China: Contagion, Sex, & Black Magic” Angela Ki Che Leung, Former Director, ISSP, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taiwan, currently at the School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ. 7:30 pm, Olin Language Center 115.

Japanese Noh Drama in Performance

Tuesday, April 13, 2004
Professor Carol Martin, New York University The performance structure of Noh and its relationship to Zeami's key aesthetic ideas will be compared and contrasted with Aristotle's notion of the perfect drama.

Lecture: "Is China's Hypergrowth Sustainable?"

Tuesday, March 16, 2004
Edward K. Y. Chen, noted economist and president of Lignan University in Hong Kong, will discuss issues surrounding growth and sustainability in China. His talk, "Is China's Hypergrowth Sustainable?", is presented by Bard in China with support from the Freeman Undergraduate Asian Studies Initiative.

Bringing the Subject to the Stage in Medieval Japan

Tuesday, March 16, 2004
Professor Thomas Hare, Princeton University Abstract: Noh drama, for all its investment in centuries-old performance conventions and medieval Buddhist cosmology, is primarily interested in representing the inner world of its characters in a palpable way on stage. The enterprise wherein a troupe of actors accomplishes this is a strict and hierarchically organized structure, but it allows even its least obtrusive members a measure of artistic freedom and an opportunity for aesthetic ecstasy.

Open Forum: "China's Energy: Resources, Demands, Concerns, and the Future"

Wednesday, March 10, 2004
"China's Energy: Resources, Demands, Concerns, and the Future." Featured speakers Kimball C. Chen, cochairman, ETG Energy Transportation Group, Inc.; Daniel Dudek, chief economist, Environmental Defense; Barbara Finamore, director, China Clean Energy Project, Natural Resources Defense Council; and Patrick J. D'Addario, president, Fiorello H. LaGuardia Foundation. Fox-Przeworski, director of the Bard Center for Environmental Policy and former director for North America of the United Nations Environment Programme, will introduce and moderate the open forum.
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Kyogen: Classical comedy and contemporary creativity

Tuesday, March 9, 2004
Professor Jonah Salz, Ryukoku University Abstract: Classical Japanese comedy's fascination will be explored in traditional plays as well as recent experiments with Shakespeare and Beckett.

Japanese Noh Drama in Performance

Tuesday, February 24, 2004
Professor Carol Martin, New York University Abstract: The performance structure of Noh and its relationship to Zeami's key aesthetic ideas will be compared and contrasted with Aristotle's notion of the perfect drama.

Lecture: "North Korea, its Neighbors, and the United States,"

Thursday, February 19, 2004
"North Korea, its Neighbors, and the United States," Aleksandr N. Ilitchev, United Nations' Department of Political Affairs; Charles K. Armstrong, Columbia University & Weatherhead East Asian Institute; and Leon Sigal, Northeast Asia Cooperative Security Project at the Social Science Research Council in New York. The event, sponsored by Bard's International Studies program with support from the Freeman Undergraduate Asian Studies Initiative, is free and open to the public and takes place 7:30 p.m. in room 115 of the Olin Language Center on the Bard College campus.

Kabuki: Tradition and Innovation

Tuesday, February 17, 2004
Professor Zvika Serper, Tel Aviv University Abstract: The lecture/demonstration concentrates on the unique theatrical acting techniques and esthetic developed by the Kabuki actors over the years, within the context of the Kabuki dramatic characteristics and the previous traditional theatrical forms of Noh and Kyogen, through live demonstration of acting segments and video clips.

Concert

Saturday, November 8, 2003
“Kabir in Song: The Musical Life of a Great Religious Poet of India.” Presented by the Music Program and the Freeman Undergraduate Asian Initiative at Bard College.

Conference of Asian Studies

Wednesday, October 29, 2003 – Thursday, October 30, 2003
Bard College will be hosting the New York Conference of Asian Studies October 29–30, 2004. There will be an extravagant gamelan performance in the Fisher Performing Arts Center and a special public lecture by the famous writer on Japanese culture and film, Donald Richie. Both of these are open to the public. All conference events open to students.

Concert

Wednesday, October 15, 2003
“Kiranavali—Songs of South India.” Featured artists include vocalist Kiranavali Vidyasankar, violinist S. Subhalakshmi, and J. Vaidhyanathan on mridangam (double-headed drum). Presented by the Music Program and the Freeman Undergraduate Asian Studies Initiative at Bard College.

Performance

Saturday, October 4, 2003 – Tuesday, October 7, 2003
Bertolt Brecht’s The Good Woman of Sichuan. A bilingual performance by students from Bard and the Shanghai Theatre Academy. Presented by the Theater Program and Bard in China. Theater Two, 8:00 p.m., with an additional matinee on Sunday at 2:00 p.m., followed by a symposium.

Lecture

Tuesday, September 16, 2003
“What Do We Think We Are Doing When We Do History of the Body?” Charlotte Furth, professor of history at USC. Presented by Bard in China with support from the Freeman Undergraduate Asian Studies Initiative.

"Love Letters in Colonial Exile: Family Estrangements and the Distortions of Empire"

Monday, May 12, 2003
"Love Letters in Colonial Exile: Family Estrangements and the Distortions of Empire", by Professor Ann Stoler, Anthropology, University of Michigan. Presented with Anthropology, Human Rights, and Gender Studies.

"The Impact of Globalization on China"

Tuesday, May 6, 2003
Professor Liping He from Beijing Normal University, currently Fulbright at Columbia Business School.

"Civility and Governmentality in Republican China (1912–1949)"

Saturday, April 26, 2003
A workshop exploring the emergence of new modes of civility and public decorum in Republican China and their relationship to the nation's government and institutions. Organized by Professor Robert Culp, with Jan Kiely, Rebecca Nedostup, Helen Schneider, Kristin Stapleton, Janet Chen, Andrew Morris, and Rebecca Karl.

Performances

Wednesday, April 9, 2003
"New Voices from China: contemporary composers under 30 from China's Premier Conservatories, Professors Ping Jin (SUNY New Paltz), Richard Teitelbaum & Robert Martin, organizers, performed by Music From China with guest artists.

"Life After Bard in a Foreign Language"

Saturday, March 22, 2003
Presentation by six Bard alumni who studied Chinese, French, or German and have lived and worked in those countries. Slides from Chong Ming High School teaching experience.

Discussion: Bard Theater in Residence at Shanghai Theater Academy

Wednesday, February 19, 2003
Jeffrey Sichel, assistant professor of theater at Bard, will be joined by Professor Xu Weihong, chairman of the Acting Department at Shanghai Theater Academy, and Professor William Sun of the Shanghai Theater Academy Department of Dramatic Literature. They will give a presentation and discussion about a new cross-cultural exchange beginning this summer between the Bard Theater Program and Shanghai Theater Academy.

Panel Discussion and Reception: The Art of Contemporary Asian Women

Saturday, February 8, 2003
Artists panel with Jyung Hae Kim, Mimi Kim, YaQin ("Betty") Chou, Siona Benjamin, Sukanya Rahman, and Xing Fei at 2:00 p.m., followed by an opening reception at 4:00 p.m. for the exhibition The Art of Contemporary Asian Women: If the Shoe Fits and Vernal Visions. Fisher Studio Arts Building, 845-758-6822, ext. 6676.

Lecture: The Artifacts of Footbinding

Thursday, February 6, 2003
"The Artifacts of Footbinding," a talk by Dorothy Ko, professor of history at Barnard College, explores the meaning and culture of footbinding in China. Presented by Bard in China with support from the Undergraduate Asian Studies Initiative.

Exhibition: The Art of Contemporary Asian Women

Saturday, February 1, 2003 – Friday, February 28, 2003
The Art of Contemporary Asian Women: If the Shoe Fits and Vernal Visions features works by 17 artists of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Indian descent. Curated by Patricia Karetzky, Oskar Munsterberg Lecturer in Art History at Bard. Open daily 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Lecture and Concert of Korean Music

Friday, December 6, 2002
Jin Hi Kim: Komungo Muse & Permutations (partial sponsorship) Lecture and concert of Korean music, ancient and contemporary.

Panel: Bard Research Adventures in Asia

Tuesday, November 19, 2002
Bard Research Adventures in Asia: Freeman Travelers panel (Professors Clough, Culp, & Miyagawa, Students Xing & Rabbani).

Lecture

Thursday, November 7, 2002
Liu, Xun, post doc at Harvard, "Visualized Perfection: Daoist Painting, Court Patronage, Monastic Expansion, and Female Piety in Late Qing (1862–1908)"

Lecture: Art Traditions and Chan (Zen) Monasteries

Wednesday, October 23, 2002
Art professor Hap Tivey, on art traditions and Chan (Zen) monasteries as experienced on his trip through China, also his video and art works.

Lecture: "Chinese Calligraphy Today: East Meets West; So Ancient, So Modern"

Thursday, October 17, 2002
Tu, Xinshi, "Chinese Calligraphy Today: East Meets West; So Ancient, So Modern"

Lecture

Thursday, April 11, 2002
Li Cheng, (government) Hamilton College, "Avant-Garde Artists in Shanghai: Transcending Old Boundaries and Seeking New Identities"

Lecture

Wednesday, March 27, 2002
Cui Zhiyuan, (political economy) East Asia Institute of the National University of Singapore, "China: Civilization or Nation State or Nationless State"

Lecture

Monday, February 18, 2002
Robert Weller, (anthropology) Boston University, "The Origins of Environmental Action in China: anthropological reflections on globalization, culture, and authoritarian politics"

Lecture

Friday, February 8, 2002
"China's Entry into the WTO and its Impact on US & World Agriculture," with Greg Veeck (geographer) Western Michigan, James Guanzhong Wen (economics) Trinity College, Joanne Fox-Przeworski (head of Bard Center for Environmental Policy), and Qiyu Tu (economist, Fulbright fellow at Bard College and Bard Levy Economics Institute).

Lecture

Thursday, February 7, 2002
"China's Entry into the WTO and its Impact on US & World Agriculture," with Greg Veeck (geographer) Western Michigan, James Guanzhong Wen (economics) Trinity College, Joanne Fox-Przeworski (head of Bard Center for Environmental Policy), and Qiyu Tu (economist, Fulbright fellow at Bard College and Bard Levy Economics Institute).

Performance

Saturday, December 8, 2001
Ye Yue Opera Association presents an excerpt from the Monkey King and the Beijing opera, "The Jade Bracelet"

Mini Film Festival

Tuesday, November 27, 2001
Li-hua Ying, (literature, Bard) mini film festival, "Rouge" 1987

Lecture

Monday, November 26, 2001
Kristine Harris, (history) SUNY New Paltz, mini film festival, "The Goddess" 1934

Lecture

Friday, November 16, 2001
Beth Notar, (anthropology) Trinity College, "Border Troubles: Martial Arts Novels & Tourism in SW China"

Lecture

Monday, November 12, 2001
Sherman Cochran, (history) Cornell, "Homogenizing the World's Cultures? Globalization in East Asian History"

Lecture

Thursday, November 8, 2001
Ron Knapp, (geography) SUNY New Paltz, "In Search of the Illusive Chinese House"

Lecture

Friday, September 14, 2001
Professor Zuo Xuejin, (economics) of the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, "The Reform of China's Social Security System During its Transition: Past Experiences and Future Challenges"

 

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The New York Conference on Asian Studies: "Asian Border Crossings"

Parallel Worlds, exhibition and film.

Saturday, October 30, 2004
Panel discussion features Beijing filmmaker Jin Yan; Beijing artist Liu Xun; American photographer Howard Finkelson; Josette Balsa, international curator and Hong Kong–based expert on contemporary Chinese art; and Daryl Reis, coordinator.

“Crossing the Border—The Japanese Example,”

Saturday, October 30, 2004
Donald Richie, an authority on Japanese culture and film; author of The Films of Akira Kurasawa; The Inland Sea; Ozu; Public People, Private People; One Hundred Years of Japanese Film; and The Image Factory; and arts critic for the Japan Times.

North of 49, 9:45 a.m.

Saturday, October 30, 2004
A documentary about the post-9/11 burning of a Sikh community worship center by local upstate New York teenagers and the subsequent rebuilding and community reconciliation. Filmmaker Richard Breyer and coproducer David Coryell, both of Syracuse University and NYCAS panelists, will speak about the documentary and the reconciliation process (www.northof49.net).

Crossing of the Changes, 11:30 a.m., multimedia work inspired by the symbolic and synchronistic thinking in the I Ching. Presenters: Ping Jin, professor of music at SUNY New Paltz, and Xiaohua Sun, doctoral student in the design and computation program at MIT.

“Watch the Spirits Come Out”

Friday, October 29, 2004
A Balinese Gamelan Halloween extravaganza featuring performances by Gamelan Dharma Swara, musical direction by I Nyoman Saptanyana and dance direction by Aru Candrawati Saptanyana. Guest artists include I Nyoman Catra, Desak Made Suarti, Putu Bagus Krisna Saptanyana, with special guest I Nyoman Windha, composer of Sarwa Madu. With Gamelan Chandra Kancana and Gamelan Giri Mekar of Bard.

Screenings of films selected by the Bard Asian Film Club

Friday, October 29, 2004
The Classic, noon; Blue Spring, 2:30 p.m.; PTU, 4:30 p.m.; Last Life in the Universe, 6:30 p.m.; Memories of Murder, 9:00 p.m.

Contemporary Chinese Calligraphy

Friday, October 29, 2004 – Wednesday, November 10, 2004
Heart Prints: Contemporary Chinese Calligraphy. Curated by Bard professor Patricia Karetzky. Addressing the work of contemporary Chinese artists, this exhibit explores ways in which writing is used as an aesthetic element. Artists include Xu Bing, Chun-Chao Chiu, Xing Fei, Wenda Gu, Zhao Suigang, Zhang O, Tu Xinshi, and Guo Dan.

"Let the Characters Dance and the Heart Sing": Calligraphic art by Bard Student and graduates, curated by feng Liu, alumna

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