FILM 202 A Introduction to Filmmaking II

Professor: Peter Hutton

CRN: 12171

Time: Mon 1:20 pm - 4:20 pm Preston Film Center

Continuation of the study of basic problems (technical and aesthetical) related to the film medium. Prerequisite: Introduction to Film Making I.


FILM 202 B Introduction to Filmmaking II

Professor: Peggy Ahwesh

CRN: 12175

Time: Tu 1:30 pm - 4:30 pm Preston Film Center

Continuation of the study of basic problems (technical and aesthetical) related to the film medium. Prerequisite: Introduction to Film Making I.


FILM 211 Scriptwriting Seminar

Professor: Adolfas Mekas

CRN: 12170

Time: Wed 10:30 am - 12:30 pm Preston Film Center

From an idea to a plot; from an outline to script. Character development, dramatic/cinematic structure. Continuous analysis of students' work. Students who wish to take the course should have a demonstrable background in film or writing and be willing to share their work with others. Limited enrollment.


FILM 213 The Avant Garde

Professor: Steve Anker

CRN: 12177

Time: Fri 9:30 am - 12:30 pm Preston Film Center
Screening: Th 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm Preston Film Center

A survey of one of the most significant artistic movements in film following World War II. The course will focus primarily on a relatively small number of major film makers: the early pioneers of the 40's, Deren, Peterson, Maas, and Broughton; the mythopoetic artificers of the 50's and the early 60's, Anger, Brakhage, and Baillie; and the formalists of the 70's, Frampton, Snow, and Gehr. In addition we will consider a group of artists who have approached the medium from the perspective of abstraction and collage: Kubelka, Conner, Breer, Smith, and Jordan. Some attention will be pais to the larger context in this country, most notably painting (e.g. Abstract Expressionism) and poetry (e.g. the aesthetics of Charles Olson). The course is not recommended for the student who believes that film is solely a popular medium that must exhibit obvious "entertainment value." The content of this course will be open to change.


FILM 245 Video Production Workshop

Professor: Leah Gilliam

CRN: 12178

Time: Fri 1:20 pm - 4:20 pm Preston Film Center

This workshop in video production emphasizes the techniques of editing and postproduction skills. Class sessions include screenings of narrative, experimental, and documentary video work, with an eye toward educating students in the history of video as an art form. The course includes weekly production exercises, and all students produce a substantial final project. By permission of the instructor.


FILM 267 History of Video Art

Professor: Leah Gilliam

CRN: 12174

Time: Th 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm Preston Film Center
Screening: Wed 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm Preston Film Center

This course is designed to provide an overview and critique of the development of video as an art form, with examples from documentary, abstract, performance-oriented, and narrative work. Video art is placed in context in relation to the other arts and broadcast television. Alternative TV, cable access, and community-based projects are also considered. Class time is divided among screenings, discussion, and student presentations.


FILM 301 Advanced Projects in Non-Linear Editing

Professor: Leah Gilliam

CRN: 12172

Time: Wed 9:30 am - 12:30 pm Preston Film Center

The student who seeks to finish a project in a digital medium inevitably broaches certain issues. When originals and copies are indistinguishable and non-destructive editing creates multiple versions with minute distinctions, is a work ever finished once it is digital? This course is a continuation of Non-Linear Editing, and examines the concerns and concepts specific to digital post production. This class is geared towards junior concentrators in preparation for senior project work in electronic media. Students who wish to take the course should have mastered the fundamental techniques of digital video and should be willing to share their work with others. Prerequisite: Film 300 or permission of the instructor.


FILM 310 Autobiographical Cinema

Professor: Peter Hutton

CRN: 12168

Time: Tu 1:20 pm - 4:20 pm Preston Film Center

The line between autobiography and fiction has been considerably blurred by the influence of Post-Modernism, New Journalism, and mass media culture. This class will examine traditional as well as emerging forms of both literary and cinematic autobiography. Works that will be referenced include those by Brakhage, H.D., Mekas, Proust, Gibbons, Orton, and Saks. Students will be required to complete a short autobiography in film or video. Enrollment is limited to junior film and video majors or by special permission of the instructor.


FILM 300 Pre-Production Seminar

Professor: Adolfas Mekas

CRN: 12165

Time: Mon 10:30 am - 12:30 pm Preston Film Centre

This course is recommended to juniors, before the start of their senior project in film. The emphasis will be on the least glamorous part of film making but without which no film can be made: pre-production. It will deal with script breakdown, production scheduling, budgeting, casting, location scouting, permits, call sheets, dealing with labs, camera reports, accounting, contracts, liabilities, insurance, copyright, legal protection and legal rights, unions, and distribution.


FILM 302 Heaven and Earth Magic

Professor: Peggy Ahwesh

CRN: 12173

Time: Wed 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm Preston Film Center

The purpose of this course is to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas prior to the Senior Project, and to make available technical information useful to individual projects though theory-practive sessions. This semester the focus will be on Harry Smith, legendary film maker and music archivist and is inspired by the re-release of his influential Anthology of American Folk Music. Smith's body of work in film animation, ethnography, occultism, surrealism and music will provide a basis for an in-depth study of these areas. On alternate weeks students will present work-in-progress in class. Requirements include a finished film or video, an audio piece and a researched class presentation.


FILM 315 Cinemagic

Professor: Adolfas Mekas

CRN: 12169

Time: Tu 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm Preston Film Center

This course is offered once every two or three years. It is a journey through the idyllic times of the pre World War II era, through the horrors of the war, and into the wonders and magic of cinema. Many films are screened--some good, some bad, and a few that will long endure. Each screening is preceded by a theme song, a short film, and a lecture. The highlight of the course is the screening of Kobayashi's The Human Condition, a trilogy that is eleven hours long. Past and present political and social conditions are considered and are reacted to from the specific and personal point of view of a man whose life has been devoted to cultural manifestations of his generation.


INTARTS/FILM C Integrated Arts Aesthetics Seminar-Film and Poetry/Language and Image

Professor: John Pruitt

CRN: 12468

Time: Tu 9:30 am - 12:30 pm Preston Film Center
Screening: Mon 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm Preston Film Center

The course will closely examine a mode of filmmaking which bears a fruitful connection to both the content and formal structures of lyric poetry. A secondary focus will be theoretical and expressive issues raised by the cinema's ability in certain key works to attempt a convergence of language and image into a dynamic, aesthetic whole. Films by Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, Alexander Dovzhenko, Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage, Robert Breer, Michael Snow, and Hollis Frampton, among others. Pertinent theoretical texts by many of the same filmmakers as well as carefully selected poems by a number of 19th and 20th century poets, including P.B. Shelley, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Wallace Stevens, H.D. et al. The Prelude by William Wordsworth and Paterson by William Carlos Williams will be crucial reading. There is one required long paper and a short video/film project. While open to non-majors, the course has been especially geared to work as a meeting ground for filmmakers, poets, and practitioners of integrated arts. Juniors and Seniors will be given first priority in enrollment.


FILM 330 Film Criticism

Professor: Steve Anker

CRN: 12176

Time: Th 9:30 am - 12:30 pm Preston Film Center

A seminar, the main focus of which will be the writing of film critiques on a weekly basis. We will take into consideration no particular kind of school of film making, but will examine the medium, through the practice of writing, in the wide variety of its modes of expression. This would inevitably not only include films shown at Bard during the semester, but most likely contemporary works being screened in the area as well. In addition, we will read and discuss exemplary pieces of published film criticism and theory in order to strengthen our understanding of already established critical issues and the essential characteristics of good, forceful writing. Only students interested in sharing their work with others should take this course. Limited enrollment. Preference will be given to those students who have already taken a course within the department. Open to non-majors.