SPAN 110 Accelerated Spanish

Professor: M. Lopez-Luaces

CRN: 11617

Distribution: D

Time: M Tu W Th 1:20 pm - 2:20 pm LC 118

For students with some Spanish. Emphasis will be on building vocabulary and reinforcing grammar structures. Writing skills will also be developed. Independent lab work with a newly developed video program is required. Weekly sessions with the Spanish Language Tutor are obligatory.


SPAN 202 A Intermediate Spanish II

Professor: M. Nicholson

CRN: 11618

Distribution: D

Time: M Tu Th 9:00 am - 10:00 am LC 208

For students who have completed Spanish 101-102. This course is designed to perfect the student's command of all four language skills (speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing). This will be achieved through an intensive grammar review, conversational practice, reading of modern Spanish texts, writing simple compositions, and language lab work. Prerequisite: Spanish 201, or equivalent.


SPAN 202 B Intermediate Spanish II

Professor: M. Lopez-Luaces

CRN: 11619

Distribution: D

Time: M Tu Th 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm LC 206

For students who have completed Spanish 101-102. This course is designed to perfect the student's command of all four language skills (speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing). This will be achieved through an intensive grammar review, conversational practice, reading of modern Spanish texts, writing simple compositions, and language lab work. Prerequisite: Spanish 201, or equivalent.


SPAN 225 Contemporary Latin American Theater: Reading & Performance

Professor: M. Nicholson

CRN: 11620

Distribution: B/D

Time: Tu Th 10:30 am - 11:50 am LC 208

of related interest: MES
This course will focus on textual analysis and dramatization of plays from various Latin American countries. Its purpose is to provide students with essential knowledge of Latin American theater and culture while improving their grammar and diction. Authors will include Dragun, Castellanos, Buenaventura, Pavlovski, and Gorostiza. Grades will be based on both oral and written work. Conducted in Spanish.


SPAN 309 Women Writing in Latin America

Professor: M. Lopez-Luaces

CRN: 11763

Distribution: B/D

Time: W 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm OLIN 308

cross-listed: Gender Studies
The purpose of this course will be to familiarize the student with a selection of works by Latin American women writers. Although the course will concentrate on the twentieth century, we will start by reading a text by a Mexican woman writer from the seventeenth century, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. Sor Juana's desire to find a feminine literary tradition and to change social conditions for women will strongly re-emerge in texts from the twentieth century. The course has been organized around two axes, regional and aesthetic: 1) The Latin American Southern Cone and the avant-garde movement, 2) Mexico and Cuba and revolutionary discourse, 3) Puerto Rico and modern colonial literature, 4) literature, gender and marginality. This last section will cover writers from many different regions of Latin America. This course will require a midterm and a final paper. Two weeks before the papers are due, each student will read in class an abstract of her or his paper explaining the subject and the methodology which she or he is planning to use in their paper. These are the writers we are going to cover: Maria Luisa Bombal and Gabriela Mistral (Chile); Silvina Ocampo, Olga Orozco and Alejandra Pizarnik (Argentina); Rosario Castellanos and Elena Garro (Mexico); Julio de Burgos, Ana Lydia Vega and Rosario Ferre (Puerto Rico); Cristina Peri Rossi (Uruguay); and Marylyn Bobas (Cuba).


SPAN 322 Literature of the Conquest

Professor: M. Nicholson

CRN: 11621

Distribution: B/D

Time: M W 1:20 pm - 2:40 pm LC 120

When Christopher Columbus disembarked on San Salvador in 1492, he planted a flag and informed the inhabitants of the island, in Spanish, that they were now subjects of Ferdinand and Isabella. This odd moment marks the beginning of one of the most significant and far-reaching "meeting of cultures" in Western history, the foundation of the entity we now know as Latin America. In this course we will read selections from texts written during the first century of the Conquest, by indigenous and European writers. We will explore such questions as the following: How did the native Americans find a place in their established mythologies for these often brutal strangers? How did the Europeans, in turn, find a language, a mode of expression adequate to the utterly new reality that confronted them? Upon what motivations and ideological justifications did the Europeans base their treatment of the indigenous populations? Through our examination of these and related questions, we will attempt to establish links between the recorded experiences of the Conquest and certain characteristics of present-day Latin America, drawing upon such contemporary writers as Gabriel Garc¡a M rquez and Octavio Paz.