PSY 103 General Introduction to Psychology

Professor: F. Oja

CRN: 11645

Distribution: E

Time: M W 8:30 am - 10:20 am PRE 128

The course is a survey of the academic discipline of psychology. The course is organized around five main questions: How do humans (and, where relevant, animals) act? How do they know? How do they interact? How do they develop? How do they differ from one another?


PSY 111 Introduction to Child Development

Professor: J. Chafetz

CRN: 11646

Distribution: E

Time: W F 10:30 am - 11:50 am LC 118

This course is an introduction to the field of psychology. Its focus is how we develop from a cell of 46 chromosomes to complex human beings. Most of the material focuses on early child development. We will explore themes and theories in psychology, methods, statistics (a painless introduction!), prenatal development, perception, cognition, language, and social/emotional development. The readings are from a text and book of collected articles from both journals and the popular press. Students who are interested in psychology in general, development, education, children, thinking, or the scientific approach should enjoy this course. There are no pre-requisites. PSY 111 serves as an introductory course (as do General Intro and Intro to Social Psychology) to the rest of the courses in the program.


PSY 204 Research Methods in Social Psychology

Professor: F. Oja

CRN: 11764

Distribution: E/Q

Time: Tu F 8:30 am - 10:20 am PRE 128

This course is a contnuation of Introduction to Statistics and Research Design. A major aim of the course is to provide students with "hands on" experience in the doing of social psychological research. The primary focus will be on the measurement of psychological constructs, non-experimental research designs, and the statistical analysis of correlational data. REQUIRED OF PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS BEFORE MODERATION. Prerequisitite: Psy 203 OR permission of the instructor.


PSY 235 Developing a Multicultural Perspective to School Counseling

Professor: C. Achebe

CRN: 11648

Distribution: E

Time: M W 9:00 am - 10:20 am OLIN 310

of related interest: MES
This course is a critical appraisal of the counseling activities in the nation's school systems. Ultimately our goal is to find answers to a fundamental question: "To what extent do these activities translate into social justice?" Through a variety of readings in education and counseling, interspersed with case studies, the course will confront the "wrinkles, warts and contradictions" inherent in school counseling. Hopefully it will generate more inclusive, expansive and interculturally sensitive responses to a variety of needs in a democratically diverse society.


PSY 241 Abnormal Psychology

Professor: R. Gordon

CRN: 11649

Distribution: E

Time: M W 10:30 am - 11:50 am PRE 128

The course reviews the principal forms of psychopathology, with an emphasis on clinical definition, formal diagnosis, etiology, and treatment. The system of psychiatric diagnosis offered by the DSM-IV will be utilized in defining various clinical syndromes including anxiety disorders, conversion disorders, psychophysiological disorders, antisocial and impulse disorders, schizophrenia, affective disorders, alcoholism, and eating disorders. Case descriptions will also be included in the reading. Theoretical perspectives include psychodynamic, social-learning, biological, and contemporary research on the etiology of syndromes.


PSY 246 Visual Perception

Professor: F. Oja

CRN: 11650

Distribution: E

Time: Th 8:30 am - 10:20 am PRE 128

This course is designed for the student who wants to understand the functioning of the visual system and the facts and explanations of basic perceptual phenomena. Topics covered include the physiological basis of perception, perceptual development, and clinical aspects of vision as well as the perception of brightness and contrast, color, objects and forms, depth, size, orientation, movement, and the common visual illusions. While drawing on the results of laboratory research, the emphasis is upon understanding the principles which govern our visual experience in the natural environment.


PSY 250 Psychology of Women

Professor: K. Barker

CRN: 11652

Distribution: C

Time: M 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm OLIN 204

cross-listed: Gender Studies

Gender is one of the most powerful influences on our behavior and self-identities. This course will utilize empirical findings to focus on topics relevant to the scientific understanding of womenÕs behavior and experience: real and perceived sex differences in personality and abilities; development of sex differences; biological, psychodynamic, and social psychological theories; psychological aspects of uniquely female experiences (e.g., menstruation, childbirth, abortion); sexuality; interpersonal relationships; and women at work. Students interested in taking this course must complete and submit an application form that is available in Preston 102. Deadline for receipt of all applications is Wednesday, November 27.


PSY RC302 A New Perspectives on Psychopathology

Professor: R. Gordon

CRN: 11654

Distribution: E

Time: M 1:20 pm - 4:30 pm PRE 101

In this advanced seminar, we will review novel perspectives on psychological disorders through an in-depth reading of current research literature. Topics will include critiques of the DSM approach to diagnosis, panic disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, personality disorders, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Particular emphasis will be given to new understandings of brain-behavior relationships afforded by brain imaging and medication studies, as well as contributions from developmental, cognitive, and sociocultural research. The syllabus of readings will be based on a new book by the instructor currently in preparation. Prior completion of or concurrent registration in Psychology 241 is required.


PSY RC318 Development and Deprivation

Professor: J. Chafetz

CRN: 11789

Distribution: E/C

Time: Th 10:30 am - 12:30 am OLIN 303

In looking at development, it is difficult to understand how the various systems work together (e.g. vision and motor development), because most children can rely on all of these systems. This seminar will examine the role that the various senses, cognitive abilities, family circumstances, and socialization have in development. We will read about feral children, blind children, deaf children, and children who grow up in poverty. We will discuss the journal articles every week. Students will present summaries and evaluations of the assigned readings, as well as a major paper. This course satisfies a requirement for a junior research conference for students who have moderated in psychology. Students who are interested in child development, education, socialization, or intervention should enjoy this course. Pre-requisites: upper college standing and permission of the instructor.


PSY 375 Inequalities & Injustice: Social Psychological Perspectives

Professor: K. Barker

CRN: 11790

Distribution: C/E

Time: M 10:30 am - 12:30 pm PRE 101

cross-listed: Gender Studies
In this course, we will focus on social psychological perspectives on justice and injustice. We will explore macro and micro views of injustice, the emerging social psychological research which aims to "de-silence" injustice, and the ethics of prying open organizational injustices in the name of social research. Among the topics we will explore are: classic social psychological theories of justice (distributive and procedural justice, belief in a just world) and issues of equity, equality, power, and conflict; privileges of race, gender and sexualities; moral exclusion and resistance debates; and the politics of activist research. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.


PSY 383 The Psychology of Acculturation

Professor: C. Achebe

CRN: 11656

Distribution: E

Time: Th 1:20 pm - 3:20 pm OLIN 306

of related interest: MES
The concern of the course is with the changes and adaptations which occur on first-time and continuous intercultural contact. It encompasses two processes: Acculturation, which denotes those changes that occur at the broad societal level of culture change or the process through which an entire group changes, and Psychological Acculturation which examines the adaptations individuals make on culture contact while still embedded in the wider culture. Using Berry's conceptual framework we will attempt to further elucidate the phenomenon of individual adaptation on culture contact by examining how it is moderated by the following: Voluntariness of Contact, Acculturation Attitudes,Acculturation Stress, and Identity Development. We will assess the research on the relationship between modes of acculturation and levels of stress by examining the assessment scales for measuring the Acculturation Level of specific groups: African Americans, Asian Americans and Mexican Americans. Students will have an opportunity to explore projects on the psychological acculturation of individuals from other cultural groups and dimensions (disability, sexual orientation, sojourners, immigrants) covered in class.