HIST 102 Europe from 1815 to the present

Professor: G. Shkliarevsky

CRN: 11673

Distribution: C/D

Time: M W 1:20 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 306

of related interest: German Studies, Victorian Studies
This is an introductory survey of modern European history in the period beginning after the Congress of Vienna to the present. Although the course will follow the basic chronology of events on the continent, it will also focus on such themes as modernization and its effects, sources of instability and conflict, industrialization and its impact, the experience of women, totalitarianism, nationalism, and intellectual and cultural trends. Course materials will include scholarly studies, original documents, works of fiction, and films. No prerequisites.


HIST 116 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust

Professor: J. Fout

CRN: 11674

Distribution: C

Time: Tu Th 1:15 pm - 2:45 pm OLIN 204

cross-listed: German Studies
A study of totalitarianism and the Holocaust in Nazi Germany. A number of topics will be chosen for emphasis, including World War I and the Crisis of the Weimar Republic, the Rise of the Nazi Movement and the collapse of democracy, the role and personality of Adolf Hitler, the Nazi seizure of power and the establishment of the totalitarian state, the crisis in gender relations and Nazi sexual politics as well as the treatment of women, anti-Semitism in Germany, World War II, and the Holocaust. In the case of the latter, some of the current debates will be discussed in depth.


HIST 118 History, Fact and Fiction

Professor: M. Lytle

CRN: 11675

Distribution: C

Time: W F 10:30 am - 12:00 pm OLIN 204

cross-listed: American Studies
The course will consider the thin and often arbitrary line that separates the writing of history from the writing of fiction. We will apply several ideas about narrative and truth in historical reconstruction to a series of novels from American literature in which history serves as a setting, a theme, or a central preoccupation. The course will also compare the strategies of historical fiction with those of journalistic and narrative history. Among the novelists we will read are Hawthorne, Twain, Dreiser, Dos Passos, Faulkner, and Warren.


HIST 122 History of China from the Mongols to the Present Day

Professor: L. Raphals

CRN: 11676

Distribution: C

Time: Tu Th 1:20 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 203

cross-listed: Asian Studies
of related interst: MES
China is the world's largest and oldest bureaucratic state. This is the second half of a year-long (divisible) survey of the history of Chinese civilization, combining a chronological introduction to political developments with major topics in intellectual, social, and cultural history. No previous knowledge of Chinese history is assumed. Readings of primary sources in translation include philosophy, fiction, and documents dealing with social life. Readings in secondary sources and contemporary scholarship provide an additional perspective on Chinese thought and institutions.


HIST 123 Racial Politics in Urban America: A Historical Perspective

Professor: G. Chun

CRN: 11677

Distribution: C

Time: Tu Th 10:30 am - 11:50 am OLIN 107

cross-listed: MES, American Studies
This course will examine the historic tensions between racialized groups in the urban centers of the United States from the 1860s to the present. How did these tensions get played out in the Abolition Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, and the L. A. Riots? The Irish, Black, Jewish, and Korean Americans will be the particular focus of our study. We will explore the sociocultural and political economic factors that underlie the conflicts. What have been the ideological functions of such conflicts within the larger capitalist production and the "making" of America? Interdisciplinary in method, we will use sources from history, sociology, literature, as well as film, music, and the printed media.


HIST 126 The Making of Europe II

Professor: T. Dandelet

CRN: 11679

Distribution: C

Time: M W 10:30 am - 11:50 am OLIN 107

cross-listed: Medieval Studies
of related interest: French Studies, German Studies
This course will explore some of the major tasks and themes in the history of Europe from the middle ageas to the present day, and we will be reading some of the most recent accounts of how the idea of a common European culture and history has been constructed from the fragments of so many diverse peoples. Topics covered will include among others, the European peasantry, revolution in Europe, the Enlightenment, and the origins of European individualism. This course can be taken without having taken Part I.


HIST 132 Ancient Greece: Alexander the Great and Beyond

Professor: E. Orlin

CRN: 11678

Distribution: C

Time: W F 10:30 am - 11:50 am OLIN 304

cross-listed: Classics
This course is the continuation of History 130, although students are welcome to enroll without having taken the prior course. Fourth-century Greece was a time of great turmoil; the end of the Peloponnesian War had left both Athens and Sparta greatly weakened. Shifting alliances ensured that no one state was able to become dominant, until Philip II, father of Alexander, used guile, diplomacy and military force to seize control of Greece. Alexander then set off on campaigns which would see him conquer territory as far east as India, and fire the imagination for thousands of years. His achievements will be a major focus of study, but his premature death created yet another vacuum and ushered in a new era of Greek society. This period saw major developments in the fields of art, philosophy, religion, and science whose effects can still be felt today. In order to examine such issues as freedom vs. unity, cultural imperialism, and the relationship between cultural achievements and historical developments, we will make use of a full range of sources: literary, archaeological, artistic as well as historical.


HIST 210 The Spanish Empire in the Golden Age, 1450 - 1700

Professor: T. Dandelet

CRN: 11635

Distribution: C

Time: M W 2:50 pm - 4:10 pm OLIN 203

cross-listed: LAIS
of related interest: Medieval Studies

Embroiled in internal political and religious conflict throughout the Middle Ages, the various kingdoms of the Iberian peninsula were united by a succession of strong monarchs in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries to become the strongest and expansive empire in the history of early modern Europe. This course examines the dramatic rise of the Spanish empire, the politics of its imperial exploits in Europe and the New World, and the various literary, religious, and artistic developments that accompanied this rise and constituted what is known as the golden age of Spain. Primary readings from novelists, mystics, conquistadors, and inquisitors will complement secondary readings from major contemporary scholars. There will be midterm and final exams, and students are required to write a bibliographical essay.


HIST 219 The Roman Family

Professor: E. Orlin

CRN: 11682

Distribution: C

Time: Tu Th 3:40 pm - 5:00 pm OLIN 304

cross-listed: Classics
of related interest: Gender Studies
The term familia in Rome comprised more than just immediate family relatives: parents and children, grandparents, aunts and uncles, free and slaves all contributed to the makeup of the household, each with a well-defined role. The familia in fact can serve as a microcosm of Roman society, and changes in the legal and social position of its various members often are indicative of broader changes in the world outside. Accordingly, this course will be concerned not merely with the structure of the family itself, but with the ways in which this unit reflected Roman values. Particular attention will focus upon the role of women in a heavily male-dominated society, and the problems in reconstructing the lives of women from sources written by men. Other topics to be discussed include the relations between fathers and children, the increasing emancipation of women, attitudes towards children, marriage customs, the institution of clientage, and the place of freedmen and slaves. Letters, inscriptions, legal documents, and artwork will be used in conjunction with historical materials to provide as complete a picture as possible. No knowledge of Latin or ancient Rome is required.


HIST 232 American Urban History

Professor: M. Armstead

CRN: 11680

Distribution: C

Time: M W 8:50 am - 10:20 am OLIN 203

cross-listed: American Studies, CRES
The course is a study of urbanization in America as a social process best understood by relevant case studies. Topics will include the establishment of the nationŐs urban network, the changing function of cities, the European roots of American city layout and governance, urban social structure, the emergence of urban culture, and American views of cities.


HIST 237 The Sixties

Professor: M. Lytle

CRN: 11681

Distribution: C

Time: Tu 3:40 pm - 5:20 pm LC 115

cross-listed: American Studies
This course will examine the irony of increasing political dissent and violence in an era of relative peace and prosperity. It will touch on such topics as civil rights, media and politics, narcissim, the Cuban missile crisis, youth alienation, popular culture, the feminist movement, and Watergate. It will take an in-depth look at the three presidents who left their mark on the era--John Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, and Richard Nixon--as weel as the most disruptive crisis of the post-war years, the Vietnam War.


HIST 241 Czarist Russia

Professor: G. Shkliarevsky

CRN: 11683

Distribution: C

Time: Tu Th 10:30 am - 11:50 am OLIN 304

cross-listed: Russian/Eurasian Studies
A semester-long survey will explore Russian history from Peter the Great to the 1917 revolution in a broad context of modernization and its impact on the country. Among the topics of special interest are: reforms of Peter the Great and their effects; the growth of Russian absolutism; the position of peasants and workers; the rift between the monarchy and educated society; the Russian revolutionary movement and Russian Marxism; the overthrow of the Russian autocracy. The readings will include contemporary studies on Russian history and works by nineteenth-century Russian writers. No prerequisites.


HIST 254 Of Orphans and Warriors: A History of Asian America through Literature

Professor: G. Chun

CRN: 11684

Distribution: A/C

Time: Tu Th 1:20 pm - 2:40 pm LC 206

cross-listed: MES, American Studies
Interdisciplinary in approach, this course will include readings in history and literature. Through novels, memoirs, autobiographies, and archival sources, we will examine comparatively the experiences of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian, and Southeast Asians in America from the 1850s to the present. We will examine recurring themes in Asian America, including cultural hybridity and identity; racism and nationalism; and diasporic/exilic vs. "hyphenated American" consciousness. An important objective of the course is not only to introduce a variety of Asian experiences in America but also to foster a critical dialogue around the shifting interpretations and meanings of their unfolding history. We will be reading texts by Maxine Hong Kingston, Louis Chu, Bharati Mukherjee, John Okada, Theresa Cha, and Le Ly Hayslip among others.


HIST 278 Engendering China: Women in Chinese History

Professor: L. Raphals

CRN: 11710

Distribution: A/C/D

Time: W 1:20 pm - 3:20 pm OLIN 307

cross-listed: Asian Studies, Gender Studies
of related interest: MES
According to a famous saying from the fifth century B.C., a gentleman sacrifices his life for one who understands him, just as a woman adorns herself for one who delights in her. In this course we will use a variety of sources to examine the roles of women in Chinese society and the importance of women in Chinese history. In doing so, we will critically confront a number of widely held stereotypes of the unchanging status of women in China. We will also examine important aspects of the social organization and cultural interpretation of gender, by using biographies and other sources to examine qualities attributed to exemplary women and men. Topics include: putting women into history, Confucian ideology and images of women, the construction of female virtue and female wisdom, yin-yang theories and gender in religious and scientific thinking, women in the traditional family system, marriage, women and law, and the roles of women in the transformations of twentieth-century China. This course can be taken either at the 200 or 300 level (depending on paper requirements). Prerequisite: (for 200-level) one or more courses in Asian Studies or Gender Studies; (for 300-level) permission of instructor.


HIST 301 An Environmental Approach to the History of American Foreign Policy

Professor: M. Lytle

CRN: 11685

Distribution: C

Time: W 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm OLIN 304

cross-listed: American Studies, CRES
Traditionally, diplomatic historians have been preoccupied with the economic, political, and strategic factors that affect war and peace, international commerce, and the rise and fall of nations and empires. But what of the environment? On that area, they have been conspicuously silent. Where they might consider that the economic consequences of natural resources such as oil, they seldom consider the ways in which the world consumes that oil might become a more critical issue than its cost or availability. In this course we will make a modest attempt to address that oversight. Students will pick individual research topics that in some ways afford an environmental perspective on international affairs. They might include the Bush administration's sabotaging of the Rio conference, a disaster such as the Persian Gulf War or Chernobyl, the use of defoliants in the Vietnam War, nuclear weapons, the systematic transformation of colonial environments to exploit natural resources, the killing of the buffalo on the western prairies, or even a success such as the agreement to ban fluorinated hydrocarbons (Freon). Since so little has been written in this area, students will be responsible for developing the reading list. All will be expected to have read Donald Worster, Nature's Economy. Each will research and write a 20-30 page paper. Course limited to 10 students, admitted with permission of instructor.


HIST 302 Black American Urban History

Professor: M. Armstead

CRN: 11686

Distribution: C

Time: M 10:30 am - 12:30 pm OLIN 204

cross-listed: American Studies, MES
After Emancipation, Afro-Americans, who had for the most part lived in the rural South, began a migration to the nation's urban areas. New forms of group identity and behavior resulted. We will study the evolution of urban black America by examining a number of issues--residential patterns, occupational structure, institutional life and behavior, and family life and structure. We will also familiarize ourselves with the tools and methods available to historians of the black urban experience. Intended for history majors.


HIST 328 Engendering Women: Women in Chinese History

Professor: L. Raphals

CRN: 11687

Distribution: A/C/D

Time: W 1:20 pm - 3:20 pm OLIN 307

see HIST 278 for description


HIST 347 The 1917 Revolution in Russia

Professor: G. Shkliarevsky

CRN: 11688

Distribution: C

Time: Tu 3:40 pm - 5:40 pm OLIN 308

cross-listed: Russian and Eurasian Studies
The subject of the seminar will be the 1917 revolution in Russia. The topics under consideration will include: the economic and social developments which preceded the revolution, intellectual and cultural background of the revolutionary movement, ideology and practice of major political parties which participated in the revolutionary events, the role of women in the revolutionary movement, the political dynamics of the revolution and the reasons for the Bolshevik victory, as well as the effects of the revolution on Russian society. Readings will include original works and scholarly studies.