HIST 132 Ancient Greece: Alexander the Great and Beyond

Professor: E. Orlin

CRN: 11678

Distribution: C

Time: W F 10:30 am - 11:50 am OLIN 304

cross-listed: Classics

This course is the continuation of History 130, although students are welcome to enroll without having taken the prior course. Fourth-century Greece was a time of great turmoil; the end of the Peloponnesian War had left both Athens and Sparta greatly weakened. Shifting alliances ensured that no one state was able to become dominant, until Philip II, father of Alexander, used guile, diplomacy and military force to seize control of Greece. Alexander then set off on campaigns which would see him conquer territory as far east as India, and fire the imagination for thousands of years. His achievements will be a major focus of study, but his premature death created yet another vacuum and ushered in a new era of Greek society. This period saw major developments in the fields of art, philosophy, religion, and science whose effects can still be felt today. In order to examine such issues as freedom vs. unity, cultural imperialism, and the relationship between cultural achievements and historical developments, we will make use of a full range of sources: literary, archaeological, artistic as well as historical.


HIST 219 The Roman Family

Professor: E. Orlin

CRN: 11682

Distribution: C

Time: Tu Th 3:40 pm - 5:00 pm OLIN 304

cross-listed: Classics

of related interest: Gender Studies

The term familia in Rome comprised more than just immediate family relatives: parents and children, grandparents, aunts and uncles, free and slaves all contributed to the makeup of the household, each with a well-defined role. The familia in fact can serve as a microcosm of Roman society, and changes in the legal and social position of its various members often are indicative of broader changes in the world outside. Accordingly, this course will be concerned not merely with the structure of the family itself, but with the ways in which this unit reflected Roman values. Particular attention will focus upon the role of women in a heavily male-dominated society, and the problems in reconstructing the lives of women from sources written by men. Other topics to be discussed include the relations between fathers and children, the increasing emancipation of women, attitudes towards children, marriage customs, the institution of clientage, and the place of freedmen and slaves. Letters, inscriptions, legal documents, and artwork will be used in conjunction with historical materials to provide as complete a picture as possible. No knowledge of Latin or ancient Rome is required.