17486

PS 104

 International Relations

Michelle Murray

M  W    8:30am-9:50am

RKC 103

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights (PS core course)  This course provides an introduction to competing theories about the structure, functioning and transformative potential of the international system.  Part 1 deals with the traditional problem of international life, maintaining order among relatively equal states in a condition of anarchy.  Part 2 calls the assumption of anarchy into question by looking at hierarchical power relationships in a variety of issue areas.  Part 3 addresses contemporary challenges to the state’s authority and the problems of governing in an increasingly global community.  Throughout the course an effort will be made to illustrate the relevance of theoretical disagreements for the real world.  Students will be evaluated on their understanding of the assumptions and logics of competing theories as well as their ability to apply those theories to historical and contemporary global problems.  Class size: 22

 

17487

PS 105

 Comparative Politics

Omar Encarnacion

M  W    3:10pm – 4:30pm

OLIN 305

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies (PS core course)   The basic intellectual premise of comparative politics is that we can better understand the politics of any country by placing it within a broader, global context.  This comparative “method” allows us to address some of the most fundamental questions in the study of politics, such as what makes democracy possible, how is political representation organized around the world, and why some nations are more successful than others at generating wealth and prosperity, while contributing to the building of theories about the nature and evolution of states, interest groups, civil society, and the dynamics of political processes such as revolution, modernization, and democratization.  Class lectures and discussions will cover developed and developing states, as well as democratic and non-democratic ones. Class size: 15

 

17488

PS 122

 American Politics: Issues & InstitutioNS

Simon Gilhooley

 T  Th 10:10am-11:30am

OLIN 301

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies (PS core course )  This course introduces students to the basic institutions and processes of American government. The class is meant to provide students with a grasp of the fundamental dynamics of American politics and the skills to be an effective participant in and critic of the political process. During the semester, we will examine how the government works, interpret current political developments and debates, and consider how to influence the government at various levels. Class size: 22

 

17489

PS 202

 Radical Political Thought

Samantha Hill

M  W    11:50am-1:10pm

OLIN 301

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Human Rights  This course offers students an introduction to traditions of radical political theory, focusing on the themes of reason, critique, and power. Moving from the tradition of 19th century German critical thought through the birth of Poststructuralism and the 68’ moment, this course traces the transformation of radical political thought from a theoretical discourse centered on Neo-Marxist critiques of social, political, and economic institutions to a form of politics centered on freedom, justice, and individualism. We begin the class with an examination of alienation, reification, and the call to revolutionary class-consciousness in the works of Marx and Lukács. These concepts provide a theoretical foundation for the tradition of critical theory that emerged from the so-called Frankfurt School in the works of Marcuse, Horkheimer, Adorno, and Benjamin. Alongside these thinkers we will examine post-industrial society,  enlightenment reasoning, and critiques of power. Transitioning to the emergence of Poststructuralist thought, we will look at some of the conceptual differences between Adorno’s/Horkheimer’s and Foucault’s critique/s of reason. Following the historical transformations of radical political thought, we will survey how these traditions emerged and gave birth to contemporary political theory in the works of Habermas and Butler.  Class size: 22

 

17490

PS 206

 Gender & Politics in National Security

Christopher McIntosh

M  W    10:10am-11:30am

ASP 302

SA

D+J

SSCI

Cross-listed: Gender & Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies (core course); Human Rights    This course will introduce students to major theories and issues concerning gender and international security affairs.  We will begin by examining the interdisciplinary literature on gender theory and applying its insights to international politics.  What does it mean to conduct a “gendered analysis” of global affairs?  How do gendered discourses produce our understanding of what is and is not understood as a national security problem?  Why has traditional security studies failed to incorporate gender into its analysis?  Then, we apply these theoretical frameworks to important security issues such as, the cultural effects of nuclear weapons, the targeting of civilians during armed conflict, sexual violence in war, torture and the war on terrorism, nationalism and the state, human security and development, and post-conflict societies, to name a few.  Throughout, the gendered nature of security issues will be explored from multi-disciplinary perspectives drawn from anthropology, sociology, philosophy, politics and rhetoric in order to highlight the complex interconnections among states, societies and individuals. Historical and contemporary case studies will be drawn from a number of countries across the globe.  In reexamining key concepts in the study of international politics—namely, sovereignty, the state and insecurity—this course has two goals.  First, to expose how gendered discourses of security that focus on the state render invisible a multitude of threats to individual security.  Second, to question the role of the state as a security provider by highlighting the insecurities individuals and societies experience as a consequence of state-centered national security policy.  Class size: 22

 

17585

PS 214

 U. S. & Latin american relations

Omar Encarnacion

 M  W             1:30pm – 2:50pm

OLIN 307

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Latin American & Iberian Studies  This course examines the relationship between the United States and the nations of Latin America from the early part of the 19th century, with the advent of the infamous of the 1821 “Monroe Doctrine,” which declared America’s imperial intentions toward the Latin Americans, to the present time.  Our mission is two-fold: to explain the U.S.’s behavior toward the nations of Latin America, especially a pronounced propensity toward intervention and interference in the politics of the region--from diplomatic snubs, to economic embargoes, to military occupations; and to understand how the Latin Americans have responded to America’s policies.  Beyond that, the course aims to provide a broad overview of the historical and ideological roots of the many conflicts that over the years have dominated U.S.-Latin American relations. The course is divided into three sections.  The first one covers the years between 1821-1940, and emphasizes American military interventions in Latin America intended to establish economic and political hegemony across the region.  The second section focuses on the dynamics of the Cold War, 1940-1990, and emphasizes the real and perceived fears by U.S. policy-makers about the advent of Marxist-inspired revolutions in Latin America, which led to military interventions and covert actions in Guatemala, the Dominican Republic, and Chile; and the high toll that the Cold War exacted upon Latin America.  The third section looks at the most salient issues in U.S-L.A. relations in the post-Cold War years, especially economic integration, narco-trafficking, immigration, and the War on Terror. Class size: 18

 

17496

PS 215

 Western European Politics and  Society

Kevin Duong

 T  Th 8:30am-9:50am

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies Today, the nations of Western Europe are involved in a shared common project of transnational government. Nevertheless, they each possess their own governance systems, economic priorities, and political cultures. What are the sources of their similarities and differences? This course introduces students to the political development of Western Europe. Focusing especially on France, Germany, Italy, and Britain, we will explore how each state was formed; how they were transformed by experiences of continental war and revolution; how nationalism intersects with transnational government; and how Europe today struggles to cope with new challenges like immigration, xenophobia, and the decline of the welfare state.  Class size: 22

 

17491

PS 231

 Humanitarian Military Intervention

Michelle Murray

M  W    10:10am-11:30am

RKC 200

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies (core course); Human Rights (core course)  When should states use military force to alleviate human suffering?  Does the need to intervene to stop human rights violations outweigh the right of states to maintain control over territory?  The international states system is built upon the principles of sovereignty and nonintervention.  Yet over the past two decades human rights have emerged as an increasingly accepted justification legitimizing the use of force.  This apparent tension between the respect for state sovereignty and the inevitable violations that result from the use of military force for humanitarian purposes is at the center of the debate over human rights in the field of international relations.  This course explores the dilemmas and controversies surrounding the use of force for humanitarian purposes.  The first part examines the major ethical, political and strategic arguments for and against humanitarian military intervention.  The second part focuses on specific instances where states undertook, or failed to undertake, a humanitarian military intervention (for example, Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, Sudan, Libya and Syria, among others).  Through an examination of particular case studies, we will better understand why the international community has such an inconsistent record of stopping humanitarian crises and what the limitations and possibilities of human rights are in international politics.  Class size: 18

 

17493

PS 237

 dictators, democrats and demagogues: Comparative Politics of the Middle East and north Africa

James Ketterer

M  W    11:50am- 1:10pm

RKC 101

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Global & International Studies; Middle Eastern Studies This course introduces students to the major questions and theoretical approaches involved in the study of comparative politics as applied to the states of the Middle East and North Africa. Topics covered include: state formation and consolidation; the persistence of authoritarianism; nationalism and identity; civil society and democratization; uprisings and revolutions; the role of oil; political economy of the state; gender; and, Islamist politics. The course will cover the core literature in the field, relevant case studies and pressing issues facing policymakers. Class size: 18

 

17452

HR  / PS 243

 Constitutional Law: theory and comparative practice

Roger Berkowitz

Peter Rosenblum

 T  Th 1:30pm-2:50pm

RKC 103

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Philosophy; Political Studies  This course will provide an introduction to constitutional theory and practice in comparative context.   The first part of the semester looks at the history of the idea of constitutionalism in Ancient Greece, 18th century England,  France, and the United States. The remainder of the semester will be devoted to a critical examination of the contemporary workings of constitutional law, focusing primarily on decisions of the highest courts of United States, India and South Africa relating to critical human rights issues.  The course confronts core questions of the role of a constitution in the state and the particular challenges of a written constitution enforced by courts.  By looking at constitutional enforcement comparatively, the course offers the opportunity to test theoretical assumptions and get beyond the US-centered approach that has dominated constitutional study for a variety of reasons (not least of which, the fact that the US has the longest and best established tradition of constitutional enforcement.) In addition to theoretical and historical readings, the course will include substantial case law readings.  Students will also have the opportunity in their research to explore constitutional systems beyond South Africa, India and the United States. Beyond legal cases, readings include Aristotle, Montesquieu, Bodin, Arendt, and the Federalist Papers. Class size: 40

 

17492

PS 313

 FROM Enlightenment to Climate Change

David Kettler

M         1:30pm-3:50pm

OLIN 306

SA

SSCI

Related interest: Environmental & Urban Studies; Sociology    The course deals with competing theoretical designs aimed at ensuring that state policies attend to the findings of science in its policies on vital matters. Beginning with Francis Bacon and "the Enlightenment" in France (the Encyclopedists) and Scotland (Adam Smith and Adam Ferguson), the course will consider Karl Marx/Friedrich Engels and John Stuart Mill as representative 19th Century thinkers, and work through a number of twentieth century writers, including Walter Lippman, John Dewey, Karl Mannheim, and Charles Lindblom.  Students will write a paper on the state of the question in the 21st Century. Class size: 15

 

17499

PS 324

 Critical Security Studies

Michelle Murray

M         3:10pm-5:30pm

OLIN 309

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights Security is one of the foundational concepts in the study of international politics. As the principal rationale for war, the quest for security influences both states’ behavior in the international system as well as the structure of state and society relations in domestic politics. Too often, however, the meaning of security is taken for granted in the study of international relations, with individuals, societies and states homogenized into one coherent model that focuses exclusively on the threat, use and control of military force.  This seminar will interrogate this narrow concept of security by engaging with a diverse literature in international relations termed “critical security studies.”  The critical security studies research agenda aims to denaturalize the common understandings of security that dominate the field of international relations and in doing so shows how security is socially constructed through specific and historically contingent political practices, which create shared social understandings and endow subjects with identities and interests.  Some of the broad theoretical themes covered include how threats to security are defined and represented, gendered and feminist approaches to security, the emergence and effects of dominant discourses of security and the politics of threat construction.  We will then apply the insights of the critical security studies approach to the contemporary security environment in the United States through a critical examination of the war on terrorism.  The course ends with a discussion of the ethics of national security by looking at the politics of torture, human rights and the suspension of civil liberties in the state of exception. Class size: 15

 

17500

PS 351

 Ideology in America: froM jefferson to trump

Simon Gilhooley

  W       11:50am-2:10pm

OLIN 107

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies The successes of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders during the 2016 presidential election cycle has brought the issue of ideology to the fore once again. Claims that the United States has been sheltered from the ideological contests of the rest of the world or that we are in a post-ideological era are receiving more scrutiny than ever. This class will seek to explore the idea that the United States has been substantially free of ideologies by examining different moments within U.S. political history and seeking to assess the coherence, influence, and origins of prevailing systems of ideas. Beginning with Jeffersonian republicanism and taking in Antebellum slavery, Abolitionism, Progressivism, Cold War Neo-conservatism, and Neo-liberalism (amongst others), the class will consider whether any of these impulses amount to an ideology and what, if any, legacy they left for subsequent American political thought. In the final classes of the semester we will critically consider the 2016 election cycle as evidence of a renewal of ideological impulses in the United States. Alongside primary documents from the relevant periods, the class will study secondary analyses of the periods in question and broader considerations of the concept of ideology. Participants will be required to design and carry out a research project related to the topic of the class over the course of the semester. Class size: 16

 

17504

BGIA / PS 354

 Grand Strategy:Sun Tzu to  ClausEWITZ

Walter Russell Mead

   Su     -  5:00pm – 7:20pm

NYC / BGIA

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Political Studies  The American world system that exists today can be seen as version 2.0 of the liberal capitalist world system first built by Great Britain. Both the British and the American builders of these systems developed a distinct style of strategic thought around the needs of a maritime, global and commercial system. Students will read works by important thinkers in this strategic tradition like Admiral Mahan and Winston Churchill; they will also study the grand strategies of these powers in the series of wars from the War of the Spanish Succession through the Cold War and analyze contemporary American policy in the light of the three centuries of Anglophone world power.  Bard will reimburse train tickets to this class, Metro-North off-peak from Poughkeepsie.  Students are responsible for getting to and from Poughkeepsie on their own. Class size: 20

 

17498

PS 363

 Ethics & International Affairs

Christopher McIntosh

 T         10:10am-12:30pm

HDR 106

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights Current debates in US foreign policy have centered on questions surrounding drone strikes, civilian casualties, the targeted killing of Americans, and humanitarian intervention with advocates on both sides of these issues citing moral and ethical justifications for their respective positions.  Each of these debates beg a central question—what does it mean to be ethical in international politics? To whom are we responsible? Do ethical concerns cross borders? What does it mean to be ethical in an arena defined by the modern sovereign state? This class will explore the underlying issues and tensions informing these questions by engaging the theoretical traditions and larger ethical conflicts underlying these policy questions.  Theories/issues to be covered include cosmopolitanism, just war, and post-structural approaches to international obligation.   After working through the larger questions theoretically, we will examine and apply these to contemporary debates surrounding intervention, terrorism, targeted killing, and torture. Class size: 15

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

17503

BGIA 321

 Intelligence, Risk, Decision Making

Giles Alston

            -

 

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Political Studies Class size: 20

 

17504

BGIA 354

 Grand Strategy:Sun Tzu   Clausewitz

Walter Mead

            -

 

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Political Studies Class size: 20

 

17416

ECON 203

 Game Theory

Aniruddha Mitra

M  W    10:10am-11:30am

OLIN 205

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies Class size: 22

 

17441

HIST 2481

 Mao's China & Beyond

Robert Culp

 T  Th   10:10am-11:30am

OLIN 204

HA

HIST

Cross-list: Asian Studies, Global &Int’l Studies, Political Studies  

 

17452

HR 243

 Constitutional Law

Roger Berkowitz

Peter Rosenblum

 T  Th 1:30pm-2:50pm

RKC 103

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Philosophy; Political Studies Class size: 40

 

17582

IDEA 130

 Chernobyl: the meaning of Man-Made Disaster

Jonathan Becker

Matthew Deady

T  Th   11:50am-1:10pm

LAB:     W              10:20am-12:10pm

HEG 102

HEG 107

LS

SA

SCI

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Political Studies; Science