17343

FILM 116

 History of Cinema since 1945

Richard Suchenski

          Screening:

 T  Th 11:50am-1:10pm

W – begins @  7:00pm

AVERY 110

AA

AART

Designed for first year students, this course (the second part of a two-part survey) will address the history of cinema since the end of the Second World War, In addition to offering an interdisciplinary look at the development and significance of the cinema during this period, we will consider the nature and function of film form through lectures, discussions, the reading of key texts, and close study of works by exemplary directors such as Rossellini, Hitchcock, Brakhage, Bresson, Tati, Resnais, Godard, Bergman, Kurosawa, Tarkovsky, Kubrick, Fassbinder and Jia.  Special focus will be paid to film’s relationship to related arts and to the larger history of culture.  Attendance and participation is assumed and there will be a midterm exam, two short papers, and a final examination. Class size: 25

 

17580

FILM 130 A

 praxis

Jacqueline Goss

   Th     10:10am-1:10pm

   Feb 1st – March 16th

AVERY 333

PA

PART

2-credits  This is a half-semester production course designed for first-year students intending to concentrate in Film and Electronic Arts. The course will cover the basics of video production: camera operation, lighting, sound recording, and editing. Participants will each produce one final project utilizing the techniques covered in class. Designed for students with no prior video production experience. Section A: February 2- March 16th. Students may register for either section but not both. Pre-requisite: one film history course. Class size: 12

 

17586

FILM 130 B

 praxis

Jacqueline Goss

   Th     10:10am-1:10pm

   March 30th – May 11th

AVERY 333

PA

PART

See above. Section B:  March 30th-May 11th

 

17532

IDEA 135

 Games at Work: PARTICIPATION, PROCEDURE, AND PLAY

Ben Coonley

Keith O'Hara

M  W    1:30pm-4:30pm

RKC 100

AVERY 333

MC

PA

MATC

PART

Cross-listed: Computer Science; Film and Electronic Arts;  Experimental Humanities   8 credits This course is an intensive, interdisciplinary investigation of games and their pervasive role in contemporary life. What constitutes a game? Why do people play them? What makes digital games different from non-digital games? What roles do games play in contemporary culture? How have game-like incentive systems and other forms of "gamification" infused non-game contexts, such as social media, fine art, democracy, education, war, and the modern workplace? Do games and "gamer" culture effectively preclude, privilege, include, or exclude certain groups, identities, and worldviews? Course readings, screenings, and mandatory game play will augment and inform our investigation of these questions and beyond. The primary coursework will consist of game creation using tools and methodologies from computer science and electronic art. Students will create original games (non-digital and digital video games), both independently and in groups. This work will be augmented by short assignments designed to build fluency in visual art creation and interactive game design through short exercises in coding in Javascript, visual design applications, and Unity, a game design application. Assignments will push students to develop experimental and critical approaches to game creation.  This course is restricted to students in the lower college. Students with little experience playing games and/or a healthy skepticism about the cultural and artistic value of games are encouraged to apply. No prerequisites. Application procedure: Email bcoonley@bard.edu and kohara@bard.edu one paragraph (no more than 100 words) explaining your interest in taking this course. Class size: 16

 

17351

FILM 167

 Survey of Electronic Art

Edward Halter

     Screening:

    F      10:10am-1:10pm

Th        7:00pm-10:00pm

AVERY 110

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society  Open to First-year students only. An introductory lecture course on the history of moving-image art made with electronic media, from the earliest computer-generated films, through television, the portable video camera, the internet, and gaming. Topics include analog versus digital, guerrilla television, expanded cinema, feminist media, video and performance, internet art, video installation, and the question of video games as art. Requirements include two short essays and a final in-class exam or final research paper.  Class size: 25

 

17346

FILM 203

 Performance & Video

Ben Coonley

 T         1:30pm-4:30pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities; Theater  This course explores intersections of video and performance art. Course participants develop ways of using video's most fundamental property: its ability to reproduce a stream of real-time synchronized images and sounds. How does video technology mediate between on-screen performer and audience? How can artists interested in creating critical and self-reflexive media respond to video’s immediacy and “liveness”? How can performance artists use video playback devices, displays, projectors, and interactive elements to shape and enhance live art? Course participants will work on individual projects using cameras, monitors, switchers, surveillance systems, projectors, and software-based video mixers. The first half of the course concentrates on the creation of performance “tapes” (or tape-less video documents) and the history of experimental video focused on framing staged live activities. The second half of the course concentrates on the use of video as a central component within live art events, plus a continued discussion about the larger cultural and psychological impact of live video production. Readings on and viewings of work by Nam Jun Paik, Andy Warhol, Joan Jonas, Martha Rosler, Laurie Anderson, Richard Serra, Chris Burden, John Baldessari, Bruce Nauman, Gilbert & George, George Kuchar, William Wegman, Michael Smith, Walid Raad, Wynne Greenwood, Shana Moulton, Eileen Maxson, Ryan Trecartin, Xander Marro, Miranda July, Sadie Benning, Jeremy Bailey, Paper Rad, Harry Dodge and Stanya Kahn. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

17344

FILM 207

electronic media workshop

Fiona Otway

  W       10:10am- 1:10pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

This course is designed to introduce you to various elements of video production with an emphasis on video art and experimentation.  The class culminates with the completion of a single channel video piece by each student.  To facilitate this final project, there will be a number of camera and editing assignments that are designed to familiarize you with digital video technology while investigating various aesthetic and theoretical concepts. Class sessions will consist of technology demonstrations, screenings, critiques and discussions. Technology training will include: cameras, Final Cut Pro, studio lighting and lighting for green screen, key effects, microphones and more. No prerequisites, permission from instructor. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

17342

FILM 208 A

 Introduction to 16mm Film

Ephraim Asili

(Justin Weldon)

 T         10:10am-1:10pm

AVERY 319

PA

PART

An introduction to filmmaking with a strong emphasis on mastering the 16mm Bolex camera. Students will be required to shoot six different assignments designed to address basic experimental, documentary, and narrative techniques. A wide range of technical and aesthetic issues will be explored in conjunction with editing, lighting, and sound recording techniques. No prerequisites, permission from instructor.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 10

 

17350

FILM 208 B

 Introduction to 16mm Film

Fernando Silva

  W       1:30pm-4:30pm

AVERY 319

PA

PART

See above.

 

17345

FILM 214

 Post-War France & Italy

John Pruitt

   Screening:

 T         1:30pm-4:30pm

M         6:00pm-9:00pm

AVERY 110

AA

AART

A lecture survey of two major cinematic schools in post-war Western Europe, both of which had enormous international influence at the time, an  influence which arguably can still be felt in contemporary film. We will study four concentrated historical moments of remarkably intense, creative activity: (1) the immediate post-war years in Italy of Neo-realism, dominated by Rossellini, Visconti and De Sica (2) the mid-fifties in France when Tati and Bresson are most impressive as "classicists";(3) the late fifties and early sixties of The French New Wave with the dawn of the directorial careers of Godard, Truffaut, Rivette, Varda, Rohmer, Chabrol et al., and the miraculous maturation of a number of key directors in Italy at roughly the same time, best represented by Fellini, Antonioni, Olmi and Pasolini. Required supplementary readings. Two essay exams and a term paper. Open enrollment.  Class size: 25

 

17336

FILM 219

 Film & Modernism

John Pruitt

    Screening:

M         1:30pm-4:30pm

Su    6:00pm-9:00pm

AVERY 110

AA

AART

Operating on the assumption that the study of film, a syncretic art par excellence, offers a particularly advantageous perspective on understanding the aesthetic underpinnings of 20th Century art, the course explores the relationship between a certain mode of cinematic achievement, for the most part labeled avant-garde, and the major tenets of modernist art, both visual and literary. Many of the films studied are by artists who worked in other media (such as Léger, Strand, Cornell, and Duchamp) or whose work manifests a direct relationship to various artistic movements such as surrealism, futurism, and constructivism. An attempt is made to relate certain films to parallel achievements in photography, poetry, and music, with some attention paid to relatively little-seen filmmakers such as Lye, Kinugasa, and Jennings. Much of the assigned reading is not film criticism as such, but crucial critical works that help to define modernism in general, including those by Baudelaire, Pound, Ortega y Gasset, Moholy-Nagy, and Brecht. Other films studied are by (Europeans) Vertov, Eisenstein, Buñuel, Dulac, Ruttmann, Man Ray; and (American) Deren, Brakhage, Anger, Snow, Gehr, Conner, Rainer, Frampton, et al. Three take-home essay exams. Class size: 25

 

17581

FILM 223

graphic  Film

Brent Green

    Th       1:30pm-4:30pm

 

AVERY 319

PA

PART

This course explores the materials and processes available for the production of graphic film or graphic film sequences. It consists of instruction in animation, rephotography, rotoscoping, and drawing on film and of viewing and discussing a number of films that are primarily concerned with the visual.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement. Class size: 12

 

17348

FILM 268

 The American Century

Ian Buruma

    Screening:

M         1:30pm-4:30pm

Su           6:00pm-9:00pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 117

AA

AART

Cross-listed: American Studies This course will look at the way movies, American as well as European and Asian, have shaped the image of the United States in the 20th century. It is a truism that our ideas of American society and history (or myth) have been greatly influenced by Hollywood. Students will be introduced to such iconic films as Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Dr. Strangelove, High Noon and Apocalypse Now, but also to American movies made from a foreign perspective by non-American directors, such as Milos Forman or Sergio Leone. Finally, we would consider the way American culture influenced filmmakers outside the US, i.e. Godard's Breathless and Shohei Imamura's Pigs and Battleships. Class size: 14

 

17337

FILM 312

 Advanced Screenwriting

Lisa Krueger-Chandler   

M         1:30pm-4:30pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

An intensive workshop designed specifically for someone who plans to make a film for moderation or senior project. In a seminar setting, we will work on: script analysis, staging,  re-writes, and a shooting script.  The goal will be to develop a concise and polished script to become the basis for a short film. 
Pre-requisite: Film 256 - Writing the Film OR Film 229 - Character & Story or the successful completion of a sophomore level production class.  Non-majors must email the professor prior to registration for approval.
Class size: 12

 

17579

FILM 317

 film production: cinematography

Fernando Silva

 T         1:30pm-4:30pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

A junior level production workshop designed to give students working in film a more thorough understanding of a wide range of cinematic vocabularies and aesthetics that are unique to the language of film. Students will be required to finish short films that will explore the qualities of film through extensive in class exploration of film stocks, lighting techniques and cinemagraphic strategies. The class will visit a New York motion picture lab to better understand the photo/chemical implications of film in the age of digital imaging. Class size: 12

 

17341

FILM 347

 The Conversation

Lisa Krueger-Chandler   

 T         10:10am-1:10pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

This is a live-action film workshop. This production class will investigate approaches to storytelling and the narrative form with a goal towards identifying the subtext within given dialogue scenes. Students will locate “the lie” in the spoken word and “the truth” through visual indicators; exploring the impact that camera placement, blocking, the use of narrative beats and editing have on a particular scene. Students will discover how their filmmaking choices support, undermine or contradict what their characters are saying. Class size: 12

 

17352

FILM 357

 big noiSE films: Documentary Masterclass in production and genre study

Richard Rowley

Jacqueline Soohen Rowley

 

  F        1:30pm-4:30pm

 Th       5:00pm-7:00pm

(screening)

AVERY 117

AVERY 110

PA

PART

Documentary film encompasses a dizzying diversity of aesthetics. The quiet observation of a cinema verité sketch by Wiseman or the Maysles brothers; the comedic personal interventions of a road movie by Ross McElwee or Michael Moore; the poetic reflections of an essay film by Chris Marker; the intimacy of an autobiographic piece by Sadie Benning; the slick recreations of Errol Morris; the earnest intensity of an A-Roll/B-Roll exposé by any of a legion of talented filmmakers, all fit comfortably under the rubric of documentary - or even within a single documentary film. Each of these forms of address comes with its own history and trajectory, its own production practices, and requires its own set of skills. Students will research and complete a short documentary film in the form of their choosing. The class will dive deeper into the specific genres and practices that students are incorporating in their work. Screenings as well as cinematographic and editing instruction will be tailored to enable the exploration of the specific forms of student work.

Class size: 12

 

17349

FILM 358

 Auteur Studies

Richard Suchenski

                    Screening:

  W       1:30pm-4:30pm

T          begins @ 7:00pm

AVERY 110

AA

AART

In this seminar, we will undertake a comparative study of major directors, with the focus and theme changing each time the course is offered. This time, the primary subject is filmmaker Ingmar Bergman, whose rich body of work has become a paradigm for international art cinema. Among other things, we will examine Bergman’s relationship to Scandinavian artistic, theatrical, and theological traditions; his relationship to his contemporaries; and his influence on subsequent generations, with a special focus on film style, film sound, cinematic adaptation, and artistic representations of gesture and the human figure. In addition to studying many of Bergman’s features, we will watch films by such wide-ranging directors as Carl Theodor Dreyer, Victor Sjöström, Mauritz Stiller, Lars von Trier, Andrei Tarkovsky, and Michael Haneke. We will read a range of relevant criticism, along with contextual material and works by figures such as Henrik Ibsen, August Strindberg, and Søren Kierkegaard. Grades based on in-class discussion, short writing assignments, and a final research essay. Upper-college students who have taken courses in film criticism and history will have priority.  Class size: 14

 

17353

FILM 363

 Defining Black Cinema

Ephraim Asili

(Justin Weldon )

   Th     1:30pm – 4:30pm

  W       4:45 pm-7:00pm

  (screening)

AVERY 117

AA

D+J

AART

DIFF

What constitutes Black Cinema? Perhaps films made by filmmakers representative of the African Diaspora or films themed around issues related to cultures of the African Diaspora? Maybe a film that feature Black actors, or a set of formal concerns and approaches that separate Black Cinema from dominant modes of production? Defining Black Cinema is a course designed for students to explore these and related questions of historical representation, cultural identity, and stylistic innovation. By viewing and responding to a cross section of domestic and international films made by filmmakers of the African Diaspora, students will be provided with a historic and aesthetic basis for defining Black Cinema on their own terms. Some of the Filmmakers covered in the course are Oscar Micheaux, Spencer Williams, Ousm ane Sembene, Melvin Van Peebles, Spike Lee, Cheryl Dunye, Cauleen Smith, Charles Burnett, William Greaves, Haile Gerima, Julie Dash, The Black Audio Film Collective, and Abderrahmane Sissako. Grading for the course will be based on written responses, moving image responses, and class participation. This course includes a required weekly evening screening.  Class size: 14

 

17347

FILM 405

 Senior Seminar

Ephraim Asili

(Justin Weldon )

 T         5:00pm-7:00pm

AVERY 110 / 217

 

 

A requirement for all majors, the Senior Seminar is an opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among students working on Senior Project. The course will have a number of film and video makers in to discuss their process and techniques, artistic life-after-Bard skills workshop, a review of distribution and grant writing opportunities and critique of works in progress. The course is an integral aspect of Senior Project for all seniors in Film. (Meets every other week.) Class size: 25

 

 

Cross-listed course:

17274

MUS 338

 Interaction:Music & Film

James Bagwell

  W       1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM N210

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Film and Electronic Arts Class size: 15