16425

PS 104

 International Relations

Michelle Murray

M W     8:30 am-9:50 am

OLIN 204

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights  (PS core course)  This course provides an introduction to competing theories about the structure, functioning and transformative potential of the international system.  Part 1 deals with the traditional problem of international life, maintaining order among relatively equal states in a condition of anarchy.  Part 2 calls the assumption of anarchy into question by looking at hierarchical power relationships in a variety of issue areas.  Part 3 addresses contemporary challenges to the state’s authority and the problems of governing in an increasingly global community.  Throughout the course an effort will be made to illustrate the relevance of theoretical disagreements for the real world.  Students will be evaluated on their understanding of the assumptions and logics of competing theories as well as their ability to apply those theories to historical and contemporary global problems.  Class size: 22

 

16430

PS 109

 Political Economy

Sanjib Baruah

 T Th    1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 303

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies;  Global & International Studies; Human Rights   (PS core course The term Political Economy refers to the interrelationship between politics and economics. However, political scientists and economists do not always use the term in the same sense. Even within these two disciplines the term has multiple meanings. The course will review the ideas of a few major thinkers such as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Karl Polanyi, Thorstein Veblen, John Maynard Keynes, and John Kenneth Galbraith, and will introduce students to two subfields in particular: international political economy and the political economy of development. Among the questions we would ask are: Why are some countries rich and others poor? What is development? What are the prime movers of globalization? Is the US an empire given its influence and power in the global economy? How can development be redefined to tackle the challenge of climate change? Among issues that we will look at closely is the role of organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization in managing the global economy and the current debates about reforming these institutions.  Class size: 18

 

16433

PS 122

 American Politics: Issues and Institutions

Simon Gilhooley

 T Th    8:30 am-9:50 am

OLIN 201

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies (PS core course ) Cross-listed: American Studies This course introduces students to the basic institutions and processes of American government. The class is meant to provide students with a grasp of the fundamental dynamics of American politics and the skills to be an effective participant in and critic of the political process. During the semester, we will examine how the government works, interpret current political developments and debates, and consider how to influence the government at various levels.  Class size: 22

 

16370

PS 124

 Case Study in International Policy:   Burma

Walter Mead

 6 class meetings at various times. First meeting Tues Feb 9, 7:00 pm

RKC 103

 

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies This one credit, 100 level course uses recent US-Burmese relations as a case study to introduce students to the dynamics and difficulties of American foreign policy. Following a brief introduction to core concepts of American global strategy, students will dig into the Burma situation, exploring the many factors that policymakers must take into account including the regime's motivations and policies, the internal situation in Burma from the political and economic points of view, the role of external actors like China and of international bodies such as the IMF and the UN,  and the nature of American interests and humanitarian concerns. Readings, lectures and conversations with a variety of experts will give students a sound foundation from which to understand both the forces at work and the nature of American debate about policy options. With this background, students will look at current US policy and the leading alternatives. In their final paper, students will be challenged to apply the skills and insights they have developed in the course to proposing an American strategy for Burma. The final paper for the course will be 8 pages in length: 5 pages of analysis and three pages to describe an American strategy. Class size: 30

 

16531

PS 132

 A FACE IN THE CROWD:  Political and Literary Imaginations of Subjectivity after 1945

Jana Schmidt

M W     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

HEG 300

HUM

Cross-listed: Literature  Since the development of mass culture, political and aesthetic thinkers have questioned how it is possible for us to be part of massive institutional structures such as state bureaucracy, the market, and education without compromising what it means to be a self. In order to be someone, we might wager, we must be both separate and together, participate in recognizing others and recede from the world in solitude. Yet today, subjectivity appears to pertain to what we buy rather than to who we are as personalities. Personal conviction can thus be immobilized by an overwhelming feeling of uncertainty: Who am I? What do I stand for and why does it matter? At the same time, such insecurities may be employed to fuel the political and literary imagination and envision new ways of being in the world. This course will turn to writers including Franz Kafka, Albert Camus, Walter Benjamin, Jean Améry, and Hannah Arendt to explore different answers to the question of selfhood as both an ethical and aesthetic problem in a mass society. After considering some of the theoretical foundations of modern subjectivity, we will investigate what emerges as (or remains of) selfhood after the large-scale degradation of human beings in the two world wars. The course will ask how writers and thinkers reconceive of the idea of subjectivity precisely through its crisis. As examples, we will look at some paradigmatic “lost” subjects of the postwar period such as Kafka’s protagonists, the “schizophrenic” child (Bruno Bettelheim), and the disenchanted stranger (Camus).  This course is part of the College Seminar “The Courage to Be.” It is open to Sophomores and Juniors and is limited to 16 students. Students are required to attend three evening lectures on Mondays from 6-8. There will also be dinner discussions with guest speakers and students from other sections of the College Seminar.  Class size: 16

 

16428

PS / GISP  145

 Human Rights in Global Politic

Omar Encarnacion

M W     11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 203

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies (core course); Human Rights  (core course)  This course aims to familiarize students with the main actors, debates, and explanations behind the rise of human rights in global politics.  The course is divided into three core sections. The first explores the philosophical foundations of the notion of human rights and its contested universality, and the historical developments that propelled human rights to the forefront of international politics, especially the atrocities of World War II committed by Germany's Nazi regime.  The second part of the course focuses on the evolution of the so-called “international human rights regime,” or the main actors and institutions in the human rights arena responsible for promoting and policing human rights--from the basic legal framework of human rights (the 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights), to major multilateral human rights institutions, such as the UN Human Rights Council, the International Criminal Court, and the European Court of Human Rights, to prominent non-state actors such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, Freedom House, and the International Center for Transitional Justice. The third part examines the evolution of human rights, especially the shifts from “first generation” human rights (political freedoms) to “second generation” human rights (social and economic rights, such as housing, employment, and education), to “third generation human rights” and beyond (cultural self-determination, economic sustainability, and sexual freedoms, among others); and the means by which these shifts have come about and have spread around the globe, such as international socialization, globalization, and policy diffusion.  Class size: 22 

 

16368

PS 202

 Radical Political Thought

Samantha Hill

M W     11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 201

HUM

This course examines 19th and 20th century traditions of radical political thought. Tracing the historical development of radical thought from the German tradition of critical theory in the so-called Frankfurt School through the emergence of Post-structuralism is France, students examine questions of power, critique, reason, and the relationship between political action and critical thinking in the works of Marx, Horkheimer, Adorno, Foucault, Habermas, and Butler.  Class size: 20

 

16369

PS / GISP 206

 Gender and the Politics of National Security

Christopher McIntosh

M W     10:10 am-11:30 am

ASP 302

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies (core course); Gender and Sexuality Studies This course will introduce students to major theories and issues concerning gender and international security affairs.  We will begin by examining the interdisciplinary literature on gender theory and applying its insights to international politics.  What does it mean to conduct a “gendered analysis” of global affairs?  How do gendered discourses produce our understanding of what is and is not understood as a national security problem?  Why has traditional security studies failed to incorporate gender into its analysis?  Then, we apply these theoretical frameworks to important security issues such as, the cultural effects of nuclear weapons, the targeting of civilians during armed conflict, sexual violence in war, torture and the war on terrorism, nationalism and the state, human security and development, and post-conflict societies, to name a few.  Throughout, the gendered nature of security issues will be explored from multi-disciplinary perspectives drawn from anthropology, sociology, philosophy, politics and rhetoric in order to highlight the complex interconnections among states, societies and individuals. Historical and contemporary case studies will be drawn from a number of countries across the globe.  In reexamining key concepts in the study of international politics—namely, sovereignty, the state and insecurity—this course has two goals.  First, to expose how gendered discourses of security that focus on the state render invisible a multitude of threats to individual security.  Second, to question the role of the state as a security provider by highlighting the insecurities individuals and societies experience as a consequence of state-centered national security policy.  Class size: 22

 

16600

PS 214

 US- Latin American Relations

Omar Encarnacion

 M  W      3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 301

SSCI

From the early part of the 19th century to the present day, conflict has stood at the heart of the relationship between the United States and the nations of Latin America.  This course aims to unpack the historical and ideological roots of this conflict; how it has developed over the course of at least two centuries, and what possibilities exist for its resolution in the future.  The course is divided into three main sections.  The first one covers the years between 1830-1940, and emphasizes American attempts to establish economic hegemony across Latin America and military interventions designed to export democratic government and Latin American responses to what was perceived as an imperial and/or colonial American project.  The second section focuses on the dynamics of the Cold War as played out throughout Latin America between the years of 1940-1990.  It emphasizes the real and perceived fears by US policy-makers about the advent of Marxist-inspired revolutions in Latin America, which led to several interventions and covert actions; and the high toll that the Cold War exacted upon Latin America.  The third and final section looks at the most salient issues in US-Latin American relations in the post-Cold War years, especially economic integration, narco-trafficking, immigration, and the war on terror.  Class size: 22

 

16426

PS / GISP 231

 Humanitarian Military Intervention

Michelle Murray

M W     10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 204

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies (core course); Human Rights (core course)   When should states use military force to alleviate human suffering?  Does the need to intervene to stop human rights violations outweigh the right of states to maintain control over territory?  The international states system is built upon the principles of sovereignty and nonintervention.  Yet over the past two decades human rights have emerged as an increasingly accepted justification legitimizing the use of force.  This apparent tension between the respect for state sovereignty and the inevitable violations that result from the use of military force for humanitarian purposes is at the center of the debate over human rights in the field of international relations.  This course explores the dilemmas and controversies surrounding the use of force for humanitarian purposes.  The first part examines the major ethical, political and strategic arguments for and against humanitarian military intervention.  The second part focuses on specific instances where states undertook, or failed to undertake, a humanitarian military intervention (for example, Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, Sudan, Libya and Syria, among others).  Through an examination of particular case studies, we will better understand why the international community has such an inconsistent record of stopping humanitarian crises and what the limitations and possibilities of human rights are in international politics.  Class size: 22

 

16584

PS 239

 UNITED NATIONS AND MODEL UN

Jonathan Becker

    F       1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 201

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights   1 credit* This is a year-long course,  divided into two parts. The first part will explore the history of the United Nations and will introduce students to its structure and principal aims. It will also focus on the role of specialized agencies and the ways in which alliances impact on the UN’s day-to-day operations. The second part of the course will focus on an assigned country (for each Model UN, each college is assigned a country to represent. It will entail a study of the country’s history, politics and economics and will conclude with the writing of ‘position papers’ that reflect that country’s approach to issues confronting the UN. In addition, there will be a public speaking component. Students taking the course will have the opportunity to participate in a Model United Nations. Students wishing to enroll should e-mail jbecker@bard.edu with 1-2 paragraphs indicating why they would like to participate.   Class size: 22

 

16366

PS 270

 All Politics is Local

Jonathan Becker

 W        4:30 pm-5:50 pm

OLIN 309

SSCI

2 credits  This course focuses on the study or, and engagement with, local politics. Students will participate in a series of seminars, including meetings with local, county and state officials, attend sessions of local government bodies, and read primary and secondary sources concerning the issue of local governance. The course will require out of class fieldwork that will allow students to contextualize their in-class study. Evaluation will be based on written assignments, including a paper, and class participation. Some seminars will be open to the broader community. The course will meet once weekly, although several sessions will occur at night to correspond to public meetings of local governing bodies. The course will be for two credits, although students will be given the opportunity to do a linked tutorial or independent study which may allow them to receive four credits.  Class size: 15

 

16434

PS / GISP  273

 Diplomacy in international politics

James Ketterer

M W     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 310

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies (core course);  Human Rights  The course explores the history, complexity and changing nature of diplomacy and international development.  Students will gain an understanding of the basic goals, constraints and structures of diplomacy: diplomatic corps, embassies, consulates, aid missions, attaches, envoys and the use of non-traditional diplomats.  They will then examine the evolution of those components and contexts to include public diplomacy, cyber diplomacy, diplomacy in combat zones and the use of international development as a foreign policy tool.  Using selected diplomatic crises as case studies, students will analyze the roles played by different government agencies, militaries, international & regional organizations, the media, public interest groups, private foundations, contractors, commercial interests, educational institutions, and law enforcement officials. Students will explore how nations communicate with each other in the 21st century (formally and informally) and will use in-class simulations and videoconferences with students across the Bard international network to explore the roles played by different actors in addressing immediate crises and longer-term diplomatic issues.  This course will enhance students’ understanding of international relations, foreign policy formulation and implementation, and diplomatic history.  Class size: 18

 

16411

PS /  HIST 283

 Environmental Politics:East Asia

Robert Culp

 T Th    11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLINLC 115

SSCI

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; History  This class explores the history and politics of environmental change and efforts to manage it across East Asia. China, Japan, and Korea have all undergone rapid economic development in recent decades, leading to dramatic changes in the livelihoods of their people. But rapid development also had steep environmental costs. This class explores the similarities and differences in the ways that each country has approached the environment, from historical themes in the culture, society, and religion of each place, to more modern domestic and international concerns over pollution, waste, energy and food security, population growth, resource degradation, public health, and social justice. We will explore both how the region's strong states have confronted environmental crises and how social movements have created openings for environmental law and policy along with a more vibrant civil society in all three countries, despite post-World War II histories of an entrenched political class resisting popular opposition.  Class size: 22

 

16367

PS 295

 Revolutionary Constitutionalism

Roger Berkowitz

M W     3:10 pm-4:30 pm

HAC

HUM

2 credits   Cross-listed: Human Rights; Philosophy On the most existential political questions of war, taxes, corruption, and trust, we are experiencing a “credibility gap”—not only are those in power not believed, they are held in contempt. We are facing in the United States and around the world a radical loss of political legitimacy. It is periods like these when political power is diminished that the possibility of new political systems has emerged. These are revolutionary times. But what is a revolution? And what makes a successful revolution? At root, a revolution requires revolutionaries, those who not only courageously risk their lives but also have the courage to think new thoughts and dream new dreams. But something more is required. According to Hannah Arendt, successful revolutions constitute freedom. It is not surprising that in her book “On Revolution” Arendt has two long chapters on the American Constitution.  This short course (2 credits) asks the question, what is the role of the American Constitution in the American Revolution. Our principle text will be Hannah Arendt’s book “On Revolution” and we will focus on the Constitutional aspects of Arendt’s argument.  We will meet for four sessions in February and for two additional sessions in April. In between, in March, students will do research and write drafts of papers on the historical or philosophical background of Arendt’s text. Final papers will then be revised and submitted by the end of April.  Class size: 16

 

16432

PS 314

 Political EconomY of Development

Sanjib Baruah

 W        10:10 am-12:30 pm

OLIN 301

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights  The study of economic development of the “Third World” has gone through several intellectual phases. The first generation of scholars viewed the process somewhat optimistically as the global extension of modernity. Neo-Marxist critics tried to locate Third World underdevelopment in the history of colonialism and in the persistence of structures of dependency of Third World countries.   “Post-development” theorists took on the idea of development itself.   Globalization and the emergence of a new international division of labor, has reframed the debates. Developing countries like ArgentinaBrazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico and South Africa are now members of the G-20 group of countries, which many see as a likely successor to the G8 group of leading industrial economies.  After reading representative authors of competing theoretical traditions, we will move on to concrete cases. This segment will be shaped partly by student interest. The course is meant as an Upper College seminar for students with some prior background in issues of development (through  PS 109: Political Economy, or other courses).  Research papers and class presentations are among the requirements.  Class size: 15

 

16525

BGIA / PS 354

GRAND STRATEGY FROM SUN TZU TO CLAUSEWITZ

Walter Russell Mead

Su        5:00 pm-7:20 pm

NYC

SSCI

Cross-listed: Political Studies  The question of what war is and how wars can be won has exercised great minds from the dawn of recorded history. In this advanced seminar, students will explore classic texts on conflict from ancient China to modern Europe. The class will examine the nature of conflict, the role of chance in human affairs, the definition of power and the development of strategic thought. (Note!  Bard will provide transportation for Annandale based students who enroll in this class.) Class size: 15

 

16436

PS 363

 Ethics & International Affairs

Christopher McIntosh

 T         10:10 am-12:30 pm

OLIN 308

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights  Current debates in US foreign policy have centered on questions surrounding drone strikes, civilian casualties, the targeted killing of Americans, and humanitarian intervention with advocates on both sides of these issues citing moral and ethical justifications for their respective positions.  Each of these debates beg a central question—what does it mean to be ethical in international politics? To whom are we responsible? Do ethical concerns cross borders? What does it mean to be ethical in an arena defined by the modern sovereign state? This class will explore the underlying issues and tensions informing these questions by engaging the theoretical traditions and larger ethical conflicts underlying these policy questions.  Theories/issues to be covered include cosmopolitanism, just war, and post-structural approaches to international obligation.   After working through the larger questions theoretically, we will examine and apply these to contemporary debates surrounding intervention, terrorism, targeted killing, and torture.  Class size: 15

 

 

CROSS-LISTED IN POLITICAL STUDIES:

 

16387

ECON 203

 Game Theory

Aniruddha Mitra

 T Th    10:10 am-11:30 am

HEG 204

SSCI

 

16354

HIST 240

 20th C. Diplomatic History

Sean McMeekin

M W     3:10 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 103

HIST

 

16347

HIST 2113

 US Foreign Policy since 1890

Richard Aldous

 T Th    4:40 pm-6:00 pm

RKC 101

HIST

 

16409

HIST 2241

 Contemporary Russia

Sean McMeekin

M W     11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 204

HIST

 

16416

PHIL 216

 Political Theory

Jay Elliott

M W     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 101

HUM