Music Program Requirements

 

A student choosing to major in music can develop a course of study intended to cultivate specific musical interests and abilities. Advisers in each music field may suggest the best academic plan for each student. Areas of focus include performance or composition in classical, jazz, or electronic music genres; western music research and history; music theory and analysis; and ethnomusicology. To fulfill requirements in a desired focus, students are suggested to take no fewer than six 200/300 level theory and history courses by the time of graduation. Additional requirements may include regular enrollment in one or more of the performance workshops, private lessons, composition workshops, or ensembles that are offered each semester. By the time of moderation, a student should ideally have completed half of their suggested course requirements.

Students’ Moderation and Senior Projects should ideally reflect their expressed musical interests and goals, whether they are based in performance, composition, research, analysis, or any combination of these. The Moderation Project for a student focused on composition or performance usually consists of a 25-40 minute recital, highlighting original work and/or other repertoire. For students interested in music scholarship or analysis, a substantial music history or theory paper serves as an appropriate moderation project.

 

A Senior Project in music can be accomplished in a variety of ways. Performers and composers usually present two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each. For some composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra. In certain circumstances, a finished, sophisticatedly produced recording or multimedia project serves in place of a live performance. Music History and Theory students typically present an advanced, scholarly research or analysis paper as the main component of a Senior Project.

 

 

College & Community Ensembles

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble one or two credits may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

 

16317

MUS 104

 Bard College Orchestra

Zachary Schwartzman

M         7:30 pm-10:30 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended.   Auditions for new members: please contact Greg Armbruster at garmbrus@bard.edu. (Please be prepared to play two pieces—one slower and lyrical, and one faster.)   Auditions for new members will be on Monday, February 8, 2016.  Please contact Greg Armbruster at garmbrus@bard.edu regarding auditions.  The first rehearsal will be Monday, February 15, 2016.  Class size: 30

 

16285

MUS 105

 Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

 T         7:30 pm-10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

 1 credit  First rehearsal will be February 16, 2016 at 7:30 pm. Class size: 35

 

16300

MUS 106

 Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

 By arrangement.-

 

PART

Class size: 16

 

16329

MUS 108 CV

 Samba Ensemble

Carlos Valdez

 F         12:00 pm-2:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

1 credit  Samba Ensemble provides the opportunity to learn exotic Brazilian rhythms (samba, maracatu, batucada, samba reggai). Class size: 20

 

16316

MUS 108 MS

 Electric Guitar Ensemble

Matthew Sargent

M         6:20 pm-7:40 pm

BLM N119

PART

This ensemble will focus on contemporary/experimental electric guitar repertoire, including Reich, Vierk, Tenney, Polansky, Cage, and others. Enrolled students will also be encouraged to compose new works for the ensemble. The ensemble will present a concert at the end of the semester. The course requires the ability to read musical notation (non-reading students committed to learning notation may contact Matt Sargent prior to registration). Class size: 10

 

16319

MUS 108 MS2

 Eastern European Ensemble

Maria Sonevytsky

 W        7:00 pm- 9:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

Bard’s Eastern European Ensemble will focus on the repertoires of a variety of Eastern European musical traditions, including but not limited to Ukrainian, klezmer, Bulgarian, Macedonian, and Crimean Tatar traditions. Students will be encouraged to innovate within specific musical idioms, and, in addition to playing, we will listen to a variety of musicians whose musical projects cut across indigenous, experimental, and popular music genres. This ensemble is open to instrumentalist and vocalists. Please e-mail the instructor with a paragraph stating your musical performance experience and interest.  Class size: 15

 

16320

MUS 108 PS

 Mixed Trios, Quartets, Quintets

Patricia Spencer

 T         5:00 pm-7:00 pm**

BLM HALL

PART

Mixing winds and strings in an ensemble offers special challenges (such as matching tonguing and bowing) as well as unique colors, and taps into a wealth of repertoire. Choices for flute and strings include classics by Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn, strong works by more recent composers (Amy Beach, Alberto Ginastera, and others) and contemporary giants such as John Harbison, Thea Musgrave and Nicholas Maw.  Choices for clarinet or oboe or bassoon and strings likewise include a wide range:  Mozart, Danzi, Brahms, Joan Tower, Shulamit Ran, and many, many more. [**Note:  Class meetings are arranged according to the schedules of those who sign up.]   Class size: 15

 

16321

MUS 108 PS2

 Ensemble for Any Instrument

Patricia Spencer

 T         7:30 pm-9:00 pm

BDH

PART

The large variety of works written “for any instruments” invites exploration of atypical groupings – flute, marimba and tuba have been known to project wonderful blends.  This repertoire often requires a high degree of responsibility on the part of the performer: not only choosing dynamics and tempos but also instrumentation of various phrases and sometimes overall structure.  Members of this ensemble will engage in musical thinking outside the bounds of “normal” chamber music, and will discover how (or if) that may open a new dimension in their approach to more conventional performance.   Repertoire under consideration: Frederic Rzewski, Attica [or Les moutons de Panurge]; Arnold Schoenberg, Canon for Thomas Mann, and other canons; Christian Wolff, Snowdrop; Judith Shatin, Grito del Corazón; Kurt Schwitters, Ursonate (selection); Stefan Wolpe, Selections from “Music for Any Instruments”   Class size: 15

 

16283

MUS 108D

 Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

 T Th   4:40 pm-6:40 pm

BITO CPS

PART

Class size: 25

 

16323

MUS 108H

 Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Ketut Suadin

M         6:30 pm-8:30 pm

OLIN 305

PART

Class size: 20

 

16308

MUS 108N

 Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

M         4:40 pm-6:40 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credit s This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composers’ works, ranging from sextet to big band.  This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music.  There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester.  Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed.  Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer.  Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting.  Class size: 12

 

16289

MUS 108P

 Ensemble: Baroque

Alexander Bonus

 To be arranged.  

BLM 117

PART

2 credits  Performance ensemble focusing on music from 1600-1750. Requires an audition for acceptance. Class size: 15

 

16310

MUS 108R

 Bard Georgian Choir

Carl Linich

 W        7:30 pm-9:30 pm

BDH

PART

The Bard Georgian Choir is an all-vocal group that studies and performs traditional polyphonic songs from the Republic of Georgia (former USSR). Most songs are taught orally, and no previous singing experience or music reading skills are required. Special vocal techniques are also explored, including ornamented singing and yodeling. The group performs concerts at the end of each semester. Carl Linich, the choir’s director, has been a scholar, teacher and acclaimed performer of Georgian polyphonic singing since 1990, and is a founding member of Trio Kavkasia.  Class size: 15

 

 

Music Courses

 

16312

MUS 122

 Introduction to Music Theory and basic musicianship

Blair McMillen

 W        1:30 pm-2:50 pm

 Th      3:10 pm-4:30 pm

BLM N211

OLIN 104

PART

This course will serve as an introduction to reading, studying, and analyzing tonal music. Introduction to Music Theory is geared toward non-music majors as well as potential music majors who have had little or no exposure to reading music. We will begin with the basics of musical notation, progressing to the identification of scales, triads, and seventh chords.  (This course does not count towards the theory requirement for the music program.) Class size: 20

 

16305

MUS 127

 INTRO TO WESTERN MUSIC:

 the Keyboard

Peter Laki

M W     10:10 am-11:30 am

BLM N217

AART

This course will assume no previous knowledge about music.  It will introduce students to the history of Western music through an exploration of the keyboard instruments (organ, harpsichord, piano) and their evolution over the centuries.  Students will also become acquainted with some of the great keyboard performers of the past and the present.  There will be a reading list, three quizzes and a term paper.  Class size: 20

 

16451

MUS 131

 Introduction to Jazz History

Franz Nicolay

 W F    3:10 pm-4:30 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies  The course will survey the development of jazz from its roots in the combination of African indigenous elements with American popular music of the late 19th century through its establishment as a concert music. Through close listening and reading, students will learn to identify the basics of jazz form, the stages of improvisational technique, and the roles of pivotal figures. We will also cover important meta-discussions including: the “neo-classical” movement and institutionalization of jazz, attempts to integrate jazz language into classical music; jazz, drugs, and “hipsterism;” the move from jazz as popular music in social settings to art music in concert settings, the role of improvisation, and questions of race, class, gender, and appropriation. Students will develop critical writing and listening skills through a variety of formal and informal exercises. There are no prerequisites for this course, and it requires no previous musical experience. It satisfies the music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 22

 

16315

MUS 143

 Contemporary Electronics

Matthew Sargent

 T         4:40 pm-7:00 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course will provide an introduction to electronic and experimental music with a particular focus on hacking culture, musical sampling, and the history of recording technology.  Students will participate in hands-on demonstrations of electronic music tools (turntables, transducers, contact mics, etc.) as well as in-class recreations of classic experimental music pieces. The course will also include connections with other disciplines, such as sound poetry and conceptual writing.  Throughout the course, there will be an emphasis on the creation of new musical works as a method of communing with the course material. Students will be expected to make several compositions in the electronic music studio. The class will present a public concert at the end of the semester.  Class size: 20

 

16296

MUS 172

 Jazz Harmony II

John Esposito

M W     10:10 am-11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  This course will include acquisition of the basic skills that make up the foundation of all jazz styles.  We will also study the jazz language from the BEBOP ERA up to the 60’s. This course fulfills a music theory/performance requirement for music majors. Class size: 25

 

16294

MUS 202

 Music Theory / Ear Training II

Erika Allen

Kyle Gann

M W     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

T Th    1:30 pm-2:50 pm

BLM N217

PART

Continuation of Music Theory I, introduction to harmony, various seventh chords, secondary dominants, basics of modulation, four-part writing and voice-leading.  End result: ability to write a hymn, song or brief movement of tonal music.  Theoretical work will be complemented by ear-training classes focused on the singing and recognition of harmonies, score-reading and rhythmic studies. Prerequisite: Music Theory I or equivalent (knowledge of scales and keys).  This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors. ( *Note: course will meet 4 days weekly, two days cover theory, 2 days cover ear-training.) 

 Class size: 20

 

16306

MUS 203

 FROM ORPHEUS TO OEDIPUS: Greek Themes IN Western Music FROM 1600 TO THE PRESENT

Peter Laki

M W     3:10 pm-4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

Cross-listed: Classical Studies   This course will focus on a selected number of works (operas, oratorios, symphonic poems, art songs) based on ancient Greek topics.  We will begin with early opera and move through the Classic and Romantic eras to the 20th and 21st centuries.  The focus will be on how composers of different eras, nationalities and stylistic orientations found inspiration in the same literary sources and how they reinterpreted those sources to give expression to their own artistic personalities.  At the beginning of the semester, I will provide a list of works from which students will have to choose one for their individual research projects, presented both orally and in written form.  Readings will be assigned for each of the works we will study; there will also be two take-home exams and one final in-class quiz.  The works studied will include, but will not be limited to: Monteverdi: Orfeo; Gluck: Orfeo, Iphigénie en Tauride; Schubert: Prometheus, Ganymed, Gruppe aus dem Tartarus; Strauss: Elektra; Ravel: Daphnis and Chloe; Stravinsky: Oedipus Rex, Perséphone; Birtwistle: The Mask of Orpheus.  Class size: 20

 

16318

MUS 224

 Socialist Musical Imaginaries

Maria Sonevytsky

M W     10:10 am-11:30 am

BLM N210

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Anthropology; Global & International Studies; Russian & Eurasian Studies  What is the relationship between musical culture and political ideology? Taking examples from China, Cuba, Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, this course surveys the cultural policies of socialist states and their effects on the lives, listening habits, and creative output of musicians and music consumers. From the politics of Azeri opera, to the subversive sounds of Siberian punk, to the performance of masculinity in Chinese and Cuban pop music, we will investigate how political ideologies generated state support for certain kinds of music while suppressing other forms of unofficial, underground and protest music. Students will develop an understanding of how socialist cultural policy models in diverse regions of the world have understood the uses and the threats posed by musical culture in daily and symbolic life. Furthermore, we will evaluate what happens when the ideological imperatives of a regime transform, fade away, or are suddenly replaced with a new political ideology. Readings include historical, anthropological, and musicological texts that examine the relationship of musical sound to publics, counterpublics and states. Students will produce written works responding to class readings and themes, and develop final projects according to their own research interests. Students do not need to read musical notation to take this class. This course fulfills requirements for the Global and International Studies program and counts towards the moderation requirements in ethnomusicology.   Class size: 22

 

16322

MUS 242

 Music of the  European Avant-Garde

Dragana Stojanovic-Novicic

 T Th   11:50 am-1:10 pm

BLM N210

AART

This course explores European avant-garde music of the twentieth century. Topics will include precursors of the post-WWII developments, the lives and activities of European composers after WWII, and new musical techniques of the mid- to late 20th-century: dodecaphony and pointillism (Arnold Schoenberg, Anton von Webern), total serialism (Olivier Messiaen, Pierre Boulez, Karlheinz Stockhausen), aleatory music (Boulez, Stockhausen), micropolyphony (György Ligeti), tone clusters (Witold Lutosławski, Krzysztof Penderecki, Rajko Maksimović), instrumental theater (Mauricio Kagel, Vinko Globokar),  electronic music (Stockhausen, Edgard Varèse), and music’s cross-fertilization with architecture and science (Iannis Xenakis). Coursework will include an exam, a final project, readings, and listening assignments. Prerequisites: at least one semester of Literature and Language of Music or the equivalent. The course counts as a history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 20

 

16325

MUS 244

 Introduction  to Analog Synthesis

Richard Teitelbaum

 W        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

After a brief introduction to the basic acoustics of music, the class will concentrate on the concept and uses of the voltage controlled synthesizer. It will cover voltage controlled oscillators, amplifiers, filters, envelope generators, and envelope followers and their creative patching. There will also be a study of connecting these and other modules to external sound sources via microphones, computers, brainwave amplifiers, etc. In addition to equipment available in the department, students should have access either to analog hardware of their own and/or virtual analog synthesizers available on line. Both compositional and improvisational approaches with be encouraged. Class size: 15

 

16326

MUS 252

 Electronic & Computer Composition

Richard Teitelbaum

 T         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

BLM 117

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing, original work in the form of recordings, scores, and/or digital realizations. These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members. Installation and inter-media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Lucier, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor. This fulfills music theory requirement.  Class size: 15

 

16324

MUS 254B

 PronunciatioN and Diction for Singers II

Erika Switzer

 T Th   10:10 am-11:30 am

BDH

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature.  The fall semester will be devoted to the English and Italian languages, the spring to German and French.  Through songs, arias, and oratorio literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language.  While it is geared towards singers and collaborative pianists, the course is also useful for conductors, other instrumentalists and students seeking to refine pronunciation and accent.  Grading will be based on a series four exams, including the preparation and performance of one song per language.  Ability to read music is not required.  No previous knowledge of the languages is required. Class size: 12

 

16311

MUS 257

 Production & Reproduction

Thomas Mark

 Th      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

BLM 117

PART

This course will focus on the theory and practice of sound recording. Students will learn the use of recording equipment including digital tape recorders, mixing consoles, signal processing devices, and microphones. A/B listening tests will be used to compare types of microphones, microphone placement and many different recording techniques. ProTools software will be available for digital editing and mastering to CD. Assigned projects will include both multitrack and direct to stereo recordings of studio and concert performances. Class size: 12

 

16302

MUS 265

 LITerature and Language of Music: ROMANTIC MUSIC

Christopher Gibbs

M W     11:50 am-1:10 pm

BLM N217

AART

A survey of selected musical works composed in the late 18th and 19th centuries.  Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits.  In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  It is not required that students have taken the first semester (Music 264), which covered music from the Middle Ages to 1800.  Class size: 20

 

16297

MUS 266B

 American Popular Song II: 1930-1950

John Esposito

M W     11:50 am-1:10 pm

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies;  American Studies   This performance-based course is a survey of the major American popular song composers of the Tin Pan Alley era, whose work forms the core of the jazz repertoire. Composers studied will include Gershwin, Berlin, Porter, Ellington, Warren, Rodgers, and others. The course will include readings, recorded music, and films. The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony II or permission of the instructor.  Class size: 18

 

16298

MUS 266D

 Jazz Repertory: John Coltrane II

John Esposito

 Th      10:10 am-12:30 pm

BLM N211

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  An immersion in the music of a Jazz master; includes readings, recorded music and films.  Coltrane’s music will be performed in a workshop setting by students and instructor.  Visiting artists will play and discuss the music. Prerequisites: Jazz Harmony II, or permission of Instructor. This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 18

 

16295

MUS 302

 AdvANCED  Analysis Seminar:  CHARLES Ives

Kyle Gann

M         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Charles Ives’s groundbreaking music, most of it written between 1890 and 1925 but some of it anticipating trends of later decades, blends tonality and atonality, cacophony and Americana, microtonality and high Romantic idioms. He is one of the most inconsistent of composers, composing sometimes through improvisation and other times through intricate systems. The backbone of this course will be a detailed in-class analysis of one of Ives’s most iconic works, the Concord Sonata, along with a reading of the book Ives wrote to accompany it, Essays Before a Sonata. We will examine all the manuscripts of the Concord in order to learn as much as we can about Ives’s compositional process. We will also select some other works of Ives’s to analyze in class. The student will participate in class analyses and along the way select an Ives work as the subject of an ambitious analytical paper as a final project. The course counts as a theory requirement for music majors. Prerequisites: Theory I and 2 or the equivalent, and preferably another theory course involving analysis. Class size: 15

 

16268

MUS / ART 305 JS

 Sculpture III: Sound AS A SCULPTURAL MEDIUM

Julianne Swartz

Robert Bielecki

 W        1:30 pm-4:30 pm

UBS

PART

Cross-listed:  Studio Art  This course will explore methods of physicalizing sound through the creation of installations and objects. We will examine unconventional techniques including acoustic and non-electronic methods of generating, focusing and amplifying sound. Certain projects will utilize sculptural processes such as casting and laser engraving. Technical demonstrations, field trips, and slide discussions will inform our study.  We will examine artists who use sound as a material, and discuss their strategies in relation to object making and sound in/as architecture. A final project will be the culmination of the semester's activities, combining creative artistic and technological disciplines in individual and/or collaborative works.  Class size: 14

 

16288

MUS 329

 MONSTERS! MADNESS! MAYHEM!:

The Wild Side of Baroque Music

Alexander Bonus

 T         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities Music from the Baroque era is full of wild things -- Furious gods; enraged lovers; clashing armies; hideous villains; and chaotic storms, just to name a few. This course explores a rich variety of French, German and Italian compositions that embrace these more volatile and violent aspects of Baroque culture. Particular emphasis is placed on the mythological origins and literary inspirations for these musical works. Each week, students will synthesize diverse materials and contribute to class discussions by offering analyses and opinions on reading and listening assignments. A final project consists of a well-researched paper and class presentation, which gives each student an opportunity to explore other “wild” Baroque compositions or composers not addressed in weekly lectures or discussions. Class size: 14

 

16284

MUS 330

 High/Low:Tensions & Agreements IN 20TH AND 21ST CENTURY AMERICAN MUSIC

James Bagwell

M         4:40 pm-7:00 pm

BLM N210

AART

Musicologist H. Wiley Hitchcock described American music as often being caught between vernacular traditions (folk and popular idioms) and cultivated traditions (European-based classical music).  This seminar will examine the tensions and agreements between these two distinct traditions by investigating specific musical works that reflect these characteristics in both categories.  Each class meeting will focus on works composed in a separate decade in the both the 20th and 21st centuries.  Works to be studied will include music by Igor Stravinsky, Charles Ives, Miles Davis, Philip Glass, among others.  Evaluation will be based on several response papers and a major research project.  Class size: 15

 

16140

MUS / ARTH 343

 Geographies of Sound

Maria Sonevytsky

Olga Touloumi

 T         10:10 am-12:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

Cross-listed: Art History; Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities  In the first iteration of this class, students will be exchanging their geographies of sounds with students from Smolny (St. Petersburg) and  Al-Quds (Palestine).   This experimental interdisciplinary course will explore soundscapes as cultural, historical, and social constructs through which one can investigate the relationship between humans and the spaces they design and inhabit. Soundscape, a central, contested concept in sound studies, will constitute the primary field of interrogation. Our class will bring forth these debates in order to reveal the nuances involved in a sonic ethnography of urban spaces. This course will engage remote campuses through Bard’s Network. Each participating campus will appoint one resident faculty member to collaborate in the preparation of the syllabus and the weekly exercises. Following the syllabus and the assigned weekly readings, students will work asynchronously to develop projects that will be shared online, such as sound walks, mixtapes, sound collages, etc. In the first iteration of this class, students will be exchanging their geographies of sounds with students from  Al-Quds (Palestine). Class size: 18

 

16286

MUS 345

 Introductory Psychoacoustics

Robert Bielecki

M         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

BLM  N117

AART

"Reality is a myth, perception is what matters".  This course will examine auditory perception and hearing and serve as an introduction to how hearing works. The first half of the semester begins with a description of the physiology and function of the ear and how we process auditory information.   Some topics include: perception of pitch, loudness, location, auditory illusions, critical bands, masking, threshold of hearing, hearing loss, and audiometry.   The second half of the semester will focus on sound localization and the technologies used in spatialization and 3-D audio. We will explore auditory localization cues, HRTF, binaural recording, spatial audio synthesis, sound for virtual realities and immersive environments. This course should be of particular interest to anyone involved in music and audio technology.  This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.  Class size: 15

 

16450

MUS 346

 Interactive Performance and Composition

Matthew Sargent

 T         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course will focus on MAX/MSP, an object-oriented programming environment for real-time audio processing, computer-assisted composition, live laptop performance, musical interactivity, video generation, and more.  Students will learn fundamental concepts of digital audio and computer programming while engaging in creative projects. We will explore examples of MAX programming utilized in contemporary music and sound art repertoire. The course will conclude with a final project. Introduction to Electronic Music is recommended as prerequisite. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors. 

Class size: 15

 

16328

MUS 353

 Advanced  Score Study Workshop

George Tsontakis

 Th      10:10 am-12:30 pm

BLM N217

PART

A workshop for composers, conductors and instrumentalists wherein a myriad of musical scores from all periods of “classical music” will be examined, to include almost any genre – orchestral or otherwise. Emphasis will be on discussing what makes the particular piece “work” whether it be its dramatic power, balanced form, figuration design, orchestral flair or melodic and harmonic uniqueness. In short, trying to get to the essence of “just what's so great about this piece?” The instructor will present certain works but an equal and complimentary part of the workshop will be students introducing and leading class discussions on a work they choose to present, with the first question always to be answered: “why did you choose this work?” Prerequisites: advanced theory and general music experience.  Class size: 8

 

16307

MUS 367B

 Jazz Composition II

Erica Lindsay

 W        6:00 pm-9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class covers diatonic jazz harmony, starting with traditional forms of functional harmony, the interplay between the major and minor systems, followed by the progression of its breakdown into a more fluid, chromatic and open-form system.  Melodic styles, harmonic rhythm, modal interchange and modulation sequences will be examined, with the emphasis being on composing pieces, using as inspiration the material covered in class.  Class size: 12

 

 

 

MUSIC WORKSHOPS:  Workshops carry 2 credits unless otherwise noted.

 

16303

MUS WKSH GKM

 Sonata & Duo Workshop

Marka Gustavsson

Erica Kiesewetter

Blair McMillen

 W        4:30 pm-6:30 pm

OLIN 104

PART

This workshop will explore the wide repertoire of sonatas with instrument and piano, as coached by the professors. Students may sign up as a pre-formed group or be placed. Open to college and conservatory students by recommendation or audition.  Class size: 12

 

16327

MUS WKSHA

 Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class  and then to Conservatory players as well as the Da Capo Chamber Players who record and play these pieces.  All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should email Prof. Tower prior to registration to determine eligibility.   Class size: 8

 

16299

MUS WKSHB

 Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart

 W        4:00 pm-7:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration.  Class size: 20

 

16313

MUS WKSHB RM

 Workshop: Performance Class

Rufus Muller

M         4:40 pm-7:00 pm

BITO CPS

PART

Song recitals can often be boring, or even alienating.  In this class we explore ways to make the performance of art song moving and satisfying for performer and public alike.  For collaborative pianists as well as singers.  Class size: 15

 

16292

MUS WKSHD

 Sight Reading Workshop

Michael DeMicco

 T         12:00 pm-1:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This workshop is designed to improve basic music reading skills.  Drawing from a varied selection of material such as lead sheets, jazz fake

book charts and simple to intermediate classical etudes, students learn to read melody and rhythm more confidently. This course works well for C

(concert) instruments and may be adapted for other instruments as well.  Class size: 14

 

16290

MUS WKSHL

 Workshop: Opera Workshop

Teresa Buchholz

Ilka LoMonaco

Rufus Muller

 W        4:40 pm-7:00 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits   Part II of Opera Workshop which began In the Fall Semester. We prepare a themed program of operatic excerpts (choruses, ensembles, solos), which is performed in the Fisher Center, fully staged and with orchestra, in the early part of the Spring Semester. Typically this involves intensive rehearsals during the week before Spring Semester, and evening rehearsals in the first week of semester. Students enrolling in the Fall Semester for two credits thus commit themselves to the final rehearsals and performances in the Spring Semester, which earn them an additional two credits.  Enrollment is by audition. Please contact Professors Müller (rumu2000@earthlink.net) and LoMonaco (ilka98@aol.com) for details.  Class size: 15

 

16309

MUS WKSP3

 Workshop: Jazz ImprovISAtion I

Erica Lindsay

 Th      4:40 pm-7:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class is an ensemble performance workshop focused on developing improvisational skills within the harmonic context of both jazz harmony and free improvisation. The goal is to develop facility in being able to improvise over harmonic structures from the blues to more free form styles of improvisation. Students are assigned to an ensemble that is appropriate to the level of their experience, with a beginning ensemble always being held in the fall semester.  Class size: 12

 

16314

MUS WKSP7

 Jazz Vocal Workshop

Pamela Pentony

 Th      2:00 pm-4:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits   Beginning level course:  The Jazz Vocal Workshop is a performance workshop designed to familiarize the beginning singer with the components of a successful jazz performance.  How to begin a song (intros) and how to end a song (outros and turnarounds), how to pick a key, a song and a tempo.  How to utilize simple (and not so simple) arrangements.  Particular attention is paid to phrasing.  The language of scat singing, with emphasis on practice in every class.  The forms of the blues, rhythm changes and 32 bar song form, and practical applications taken from The Great American Songbook.  There is one (or more) concert(s) scheduled during the semester and students are encouraged to seek out and perform in many local venues.  There is a final exam in this class. 

 

16304

MUS WKSPP EK

 AdvANCED Orchestral Audition PrepARATION WORKSHOP

Erica Kiesewetter

 W        1:30 pm-3:30 pm

BITO 202

PART

This class is for advanced violinists (and any orchestral instrumentalist) who would like to learn orchestral excerpts for festival and orchestra auditions. The student is expected to prepare 3-5 excerpts in the semester, play in class most weeks, and participate in feedback. The class will involve detailed coaching on the excerpts including a focus on understanding the work in context and the composer's style, advice on preparation and performance anxiety and mock audition practice. Final is a mock audition with 3-5 excerpts.  Class size: 6

 

 

SPECIAL PROJECTS:

Designed for music majors to pursue individual or group projects with a particular professor. Students should contact the professor directly.

 

 

PRIVATE LESSONS – (register for lessons with a drop/add form.)

All students are eligible for private music instruction. Lessons can be taken for either one or two credits or audited (no credit). In order to receive credit, the student must be registered with the Registrar’s office. Registration for private lessons must be completed by the end of the add/drop period.

When lessons are taken for credit, the student must also be enrolled in a music ensemble or the equivalent,  to be determined by the instructor. The ensemble can be taken for credit or audited. Students taking lessons for credit are assessed a nominal lab fee of $200 per semester by the college (approximately $16.66 per lesson X 12 lessons) whether it is 1 or 2 credits. Students receive 12 lessons per semester

If private lessons are audited (no credit), a fee is mutually agreed upon by the student and the instructor. If students are taking more than one lesson, the same rules apply as above – the student must be enrolled in another ensemble to receive the lesson rate of $200 per semester.

 

Ø Kathryn Aldous - violin

Ø Erika Allen – classical piano

Ø David Arner - piano (jazz, classical and improvisation)

Ø Teresa Buchholz – classical voice

Ø Ira Coleman - jazz bass

Ø David Degge - percussion

Ø Mike DiMicco - jazz guitar

Ø Daniel Fishkin-  Serge modular synthesizer

Ø Laura Flax – clarinet

Ø Greg Glassman - jazz trumpet

Ø Marka Gustavsson – violin, viola

Ø Larry Ham – jazz piano

Ø Stephen Hammer - oboe and recorder

Ø Ryan Kamm - classical bass

Ø Erica Kiesewetter – violin

Ø Ilka LoMonaco- classical voice

Ø Blair McMillen - piano

Ø Rufus Müller – classical voice

Ø Peter O'Brien - jazz drums

Ø Isabelle O’Connell - piano

Ø Pamela Pentony - voice (jazz)

Ø Steve Raleigh – jazz guitar

Ø Raman Ramakrishnan - cello

Ø Patricia Spencer – flute

Ø Erika Switzer – classical piano

Ø John Charles Thomas - trumpet (classical and jazz), French horn and didjeridu

Ø Carlos Valdez – Latin jazz, percussion and drums

Ø Bruce Williams - jazz and classical saxophone