16127

ARTH 102

 Perspectives in World Art II

Susan Aberth

M W     3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AART

DIFF

This course, the second half of the general art survey, explores the making of visual arts worldwide. Beginning in the fourteenth century and ending in the twentieth, the class will survey painting, sculpture, and architecture, as well as works in newer media (such as photography, video, and performance). The class will encompass works from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, arranged chronologically in order to provide a more integrated historical context for their production. In addition to the course textbook, readings will be chosen to broaden critical perspectives. This course is designed for those students with no background in art history as well as for those who may be contemplating a major in art history or studio.  Open to all students: first and second year students are especially encouraged to enroll. (Art History requirement: ARTH 101 or 102)  Class size: 25

 

16129

ARTH 113

 History of Photography

Laurie Dahlberg

 T Th   8:30 am-9:50 am

OLIN 102

AART

Cross-listed:  Science, Technology &Society  The discovery of photography was announced in 1839, almost simultaneously by several inventors. Born of experiments in art and science, the medium combines vision and technology. It possesses a uniquely intimate relation to the real and for this reason has many applications outside the realm of fine art; nevertheless, from its inception photography has been a vehicle for artistic aspirations. This survey of the history of photography from its earliest manifestations to the 2000s considers the medium's applications - as art, science, historical record, and document. This course is open to all students and is the prerequisite for most other courses in the history of photography. Class size: 25

 

16126

ARTH 160

 Survey of Latin American Art

Susan Aberth

 T Th   11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 102

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: LAIS (core course) Related interest:  Africana Studies, Theology    A broad overview of art and cultural production in Latin America, including South and Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. The survey will commence with an examination of major pre-Columbian civilizations and a field trip to the Metropolitan Museum.  This is followed by an examination of the contact between Europe and the Americas during the colonial period, the Independence movements and art of the 19th century, and finally the search for national identity in the modern era. All students welcome.

Class size: 25

 

16133

ARTH 194

 Arts of Buddhism

Patricia Karetzky

 W        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 205

AART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies, Religion  Buddhism began in India around the sixth century B.C.E. with the philosophical meditations of the historic Buddha. Self-reliance and discipline were the primary means to achieve release from suffering. Within five hundred years the philosophy, responding to external forces, evolved into a religion incorporating new ideologies of eschatology of the Buddha of the Future and of paradisiacal cults. A new pantheon of deities appeared with the powers to aid mankind in its search for immortality. Buddhist pictorial art begins with auspicious emblems representing key ideas of the doctrine and anthropomorphic images of the Buddha; later, the new pantheon is formulated and employed in the art. This course analyzes the development of Buddhist art in India from its earliest depictions and its transmission through Southeast Asia, Central Asia, to China and Japan.  Class size: 25

 

16132

ARTH 210

 ANCIENT Roman Art and Architecture

Diana DePardo-Minsky

 T Th   4:40 pm-6:00 pm

OLIN 102

AART

Cross-listed: Classical Studies and Environmental & Urban Studies  This class follows the development of Roman art and architecture from the founding of the city by Romulus in 753 BCE to the transferal of the capital by Constantine in 330 CE.  Lectures explore how Romans incorporated and synthesized the styles and achievements of conquered peoples (including the Etruscans, Greeks, and Egyptians) to produce a complex visual vocabulary which articulated the nature of their Empire and established a common artistic language throughout the Mediterranean world to communicate political policy and, eventually, Christian doctrine.  This course is open to all students.  Requirements include two papers, a mid-term, a final, and quizzes.   Completion of this class qualifies students for consideration for Roma in Situ, taught in Rome during odd-year Januarys and completed at Bard in the following Spring semester.  Class size: 22

 

16139

ARTH 216

 Edith Wharton & Architecture

Diana DePardo-Minsky

M W     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

Cross-listed: Literature  .Edith Wharton’s first two books, The Decoration of Houses (1902) and Italian Villas and their Gardens (1904), deal with domestic design, not domestic drama.  An interest in the meaning and appropriateness of architectural styles continues throughout Wharton’s career.  Wharton situates her characters’ public or private lives and their social or moral decisions within a carefully constructed architectural framework.  In her short stories and novels, architecture not only sets the stage and mood, but also emerges as a character, chorus, or choreographer, contributing to, commenting on, or controlling the action (or inaction). This class analyzes Wharton’s narratives in the context of her architectural principles and of the building boom of the Gilded Age.  Requirements include extensive reading (two treatises, four novels, and short stories), analytical essays, and class presentations. Class size: 22

 

16110

ARTH 238

 Mapping the 19th Century City

Gretta Tritch Roman

 T Th   11:50 am-1:10 pm

HDR 106

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities  Nineteenth-century cities posed unprecedented challenges given the availability of information that could be spatially represented. Advances in geographic surveying, the development of photography, the emergence of geography as a discipline, and even the term “cartography” are all products of the nineteenth century and carried significant weight in the practice of mapping cities during that time. This class will look at mapsproduced in selected cities of North and South America, Europe, Africa, and South Asia, exploring the impact of industrial expansion, colonial ambitions, frontier enterprises, and technological developments in transportation and telecommunication. Readings span a range of disciplines to encompass the experience of the nineteenth-century city as well as a theoretical perspective of the act of mapping the metropole versus the colonial city, including texts by Walter Benjamin, Charles Dickens, Theodore Dreiser, Rudyard Kipling, David Harvey, Henri Lefebvre, William Cronon, and Benedict Anderson. Class discussions and short writing assignments will complement a digital mapping project that critically engages with the themes of the course and places students in the role of a mapmaker.  Class size: 22

 

16135

ARTH 242

 Art Since 1989

Alex Kitnick

M W     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AART

This course will examine art that has been produced since 1989, primarily in Europe and the US. 1989 saw the fall of the Berlin Wall and the beginning of a major shift in the geopolitical landscape. This course will chart a variety of artistic practices, including identity politics, institutional critique, and relational aesthetics, which engaged this new terrain by asking questions about history, temporality, and community. The course will look at examples of installation, performance, and video art, as well as examples of painting and sculpture. Students will turn in two papers, as well as various shorter written assignments. Exams will be given at midterm and at the end of the semester. Class size: 22

 

16137

ARTH 249

 The Altarpiece

Katherine Boivin

M W     3:10 pm-4:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

Cross-listed: Medieval Studies; Theology  This course offers a thematic look at the art object called an “altarpiece.”  The altarpiece has long been central to the narrative of western art history, and much of the late medieval and Renaissance art now in museums once belonged to this type of object.  Developed in the fourteenth century as a painted or carved image program placed on an altar table, the altarpiece became a site for artistic innovation. Focusing on medieval and Renaissance examples from across Western Europe, this course explores the development, function, iconography, and art historical and liturgical significance of important altarpieces.  Where possible, it considers altarpieces in their original context.  In addition to short writing assignments, students will write two papers and give an oral presentation.  Class size: 22

 

16130

ARTH 257

 Art in the Age of Revolution

Laurie Dahlberg

 T Th   11:50 am-1:10 pm

PRE 110

AART

Cross-listed: French Studies; Victorian Studies  A survey of European painting from the prerevolutionary period (c. 1770) to realism (c. 1850). Topics include changing definitions of neoclassicism and Romanticism; the impace of the French revolution of 1789, 1830 and 1848; the Napoleonic presence abroad; the shift from history painting to scenes of everyday life; landscaping painting as an autonomous art form; and attitude towards race and sexuality. The emphasis is France, but time is also devoted to artists in Spain, Great Britain, and Germany.  Class size: 22

 

16134

ARTH 281

 Governing the World: AN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

Olga Touloumi

 T Th   1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AART

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Environmental & Urban Studies The course utilizes architecture as both an anchor and a lens to study the history of world organization.  Slave ships, plantation houses, embassies, assembly halls, banks, detention camps, and corporate headquarters, as well as atlases, encyclopedias, and communication technologies, provide focal points in an effort to historicize the emergence of a “global space” and decipher its architectural construction. Readings include works by Kant, Marx, Luxemburg, Arendt, Castoriadis, Said, Mazower, and Sassen, and architectural texts by Otet, Le Corbusier, and Fuller.  Class size: 25

 

16335

ARTH 319

 Animals and Animality in the Visual Culture of Early Modern Europe

Susan Merriam

   Th    10:10 am-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

Cross-listed:  Human Rights, Science, Technology & Society   This course examines how animals and their representations shaped ideas about what it meant to be human in early modern Europe. While some philosophers and theologians during this time postulated the superiority of humans to animals, other thinkers expressed uncertainty about the status of humans. Over the course of the semester we will study paintings, prints, sculpture, textiles, and decorative and food arts where this uncertainty is articulated. Specifically, we will focus on the ways in which the human-animal boundary is tested, explored, or delimited in zoos and menageries, scientific illustration, taxidermy, physiognomic studies, hunting and hunting scenes, still life paintings, depictions of fables, myths, and history in which animals play a central role, elaborate banquets featuring animals, and representations of domesticated pets and livestock. Short writing assignments, a research paper, a presentation, and a museum visit required.  Class size: 15

 

16136

ARTH 337

 Pop Art

Alex Kitnick

 T         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

This course looks at Pop Art as a series of exchanges between the fine arts and mass culture; it also examines Pop as a way of responding to the increased dominance of global capital in the postwar period. The course progresses through a number of case studies, beginning with the emergence of Pop Art in England in the late 1950s. It will continue by examining Pop movements throughout the US, Germany, and South America in the 1960s. In addition to painting and sculpture, the course will examine Pop through a wide variety of media, including movies, music, and books. Artists covered in the course include EvelyneAxell, Richard Hamilton, CildoMeireles, Gerhard Richter, and Andy Warhol. Students will turn in one-page reading responses each week. Two longer papers are also required: the first, an expanded version of a response paper, is due at the midterm. The final research essay will be due at the end of the semester. Class size: 15

 

16131

ARTH 339

 19th CENTURY Photo and Fine Arts

Laurie Dahlberg

 W        10:10 am-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society; Victorian Studies  Photography has followed a tortured path into the precincts of fine art, and this seminar explores that fractious history. We begin by studying the pre-existing debate over realism in art that forms the back story for the complicated reception of photography, and work forward to the Pictorialist movement at the end of the 19th century. Along the way, we will discuss topics such as: photography’s status as “the bastard child of art and science,” “passing” (i.e., how to make photographs that look like art) photography and art pedagogy, pornography, the fine art nude, and Victorian mores, photography’s role in the “liberation” of painting, and the 20th century repudiation of the 19th century photography’s art aspirations. Intended for moderated students, preference given to students who have already taken ARTH 113 or any of my courses in 19th c. art. Weekly assignments will include significant readings, at least two medium-length writing assignments, and a final research paper.  Class size: 15

 

16140

ARTH 343

 Geographies of Sound

Maria Sonevytsky

Olga Touloumi

 T         10:10 am-12:30 pm

BLM

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Music  In the first iteration of this class, students will be exchanging their geographies of sounds with students from Smolny (St. Petersburg) and  Al-Quds (Palestine).     This experimental interdisciplinary course will explore soundscapes as cultural, historical, and social constructs through which one can investigate the relationship between humans and the spaces they design and inhabit. Soundscape, a central, contested concept in sound studies, will constitute the primary field of interrogation. Our class will bring forth these debates in order to reveal the nuances involved in a sonic ethnography of urban spaces. This course will engage remote campuses through Bard’s Network. Each participating campus will appoint one resident faculty member to collaborate in the preparation of the syllabus and the weekly exercises. Following the syllabus and the assigned weekly readings, students will work asynchronously to develop projects that will be shared online, such as sound walks, mixtapes, sound collages, etc. In the first iteration of this class, students will be exchanging their geographies of sounds with students from Al-Quds (Palestine).  Class size: 18

 

16138

ARTH 363

 Seminar: American Art 1900-1940

Tom Wolf

 W        10:10 am-12:30 pm

OLIN 309

AART

This seminar will survey the development of American art from the turn of the 20th century through World War II.  Topics include Albert Pinkham Ryder and American Symbolist art; American sculpture in the early 20th century; Georgia O’Keeffe and women photographers in the Stieglitz circle; New York City as a subject for modernist art; artists of the Harlem Renaissance; Asian American artists; American art and the World Wars.  Students will research specific topics and present them to the class.  We will take several trips to museums and collections with strong holdings in American art. Class size: 15

 

16128

ARTH 385

 Theories  AND Methods OF

 Art History

Katherine Boivin

M         10:10 am-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

This seminar designed mainly for art history majors, helps students develop the ability to think critically about a range of different approaches to the field of art history. Students read and discuss a variety of texts in order to become familiar with the discipline’s development. Methodologies such as connoisseurship, cultural history, Marxism, feminism, and post-modernism are analyzed.  (Art History requirement: Required)  Class size: 15

 

CROSS-LISTED IN ART HISTORY

16557

ANTH 352

 Exhibiting Cultures: ANTHROPOLOGY IN AND OF THE MUSEUM

Aaron Glass

  Th      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

RKC 102

SSCI

DIFF