By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case.  In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project.

 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

 

 

College & Community Ensembles

 

15279

MUS  104   

 Bard College Orchestra

Gregory Armbruster / Geoffrey McDonald

M . . . .

7:30pm- 10:30pm

FISH

PART

2 credits  Auditions for new members: please contact Greg Armbruster at garmbrus@bard.edu; the first rehearsal will be Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Class size: 30

 

15257

MUS  105   

 Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30pm- 10:00pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

1 credit  First rehearsal will be Tuesday, February 3, 2015. Class size: 35

 

15270

MUS  106   

 Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . . . .

 

.

PART

1 credit  Class size: 16

 

15281

MUS  108   GM

 Ensemble: Cello

Erica Kiesewetter

. . . . F

5:00pm-7:00pm

BARD HALL

PART

1 credit  Class size: 12

 

15256

MUS  108D   

 Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:40pm-6:40pm

BITO HALL

PART

2 credits  Class size: 25

 

15250

MUS  108E   

 Eastern European Ensemble

Maria Sonevytsky

. . W . .

1:30pm-3:30pm

BDH

PART

1 credit  Bard’s Eastern European Ensemble will focus on the repertoires of a variety of Eastern European musical traditions, including but not limited to Ukrainian, klezmer, Bulgarian, Macedonian, and Crimean Tatar traditions. Students will be encouraged to innovate within specific musical idioms, and, in addition to playing, we will listen to a variety of musicians whose musical projects cut across indigenous, experimental, and popular music genres. This ensemble is open to instrumentalist and vocalists. Please e-mail the instructor with a paragraph stating your musical performance experience and interest.  Class size: 20

 

15258

MUS  108F   

 Ensemble: Jazz

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

7:00pm-9:00pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

15283

MUS  108G   A

 Chamber for Any Instruments

Patricia Spencer

. T . . .

7:30pm-9:00pm

BDH

PART

1 credit  The large variety of works written “for any instruments” invites exploration of atypical groupings – flute, marimba and tuba have been known to project wonderful blends.  This repertoire often requires a high degree of responsibility on the part of the performer: not only choosing dynamics and tempos but also instrumentation of various phrases and sometimes overall structure.  Members of this ensemble will engage in musical thinking outside the bounds of “normal” chamber music, and will discover how (or if) that may open a new dimension in their approach to more conventional performance.  Class size: 12

 

15284

MUS  108G   B

 Mixed Ensemble (wind & strings)

Patricia Spencer

. T . . .

 

BLM N004

PART

1 credit  Mixing winds and strings in an ensemble offers special challenges (such as matching tonguing and bowing) as well as unique colors, and taps into a wealth of repertoire. Choices for flute and strings include classics by Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn, strong works by more recent composers (Amy Beach, Alberto Ginastera, and others) and contemporary giants such as John Harbison, Thea Musgrave and Nicholas Maw. Choices for clarinet or oboe or bassoon and strings likewise include a wide range: Mozart, Danzi, Brahms, Joan Tower, Shulamit Ran, and many more.  Class size: 12

 

15252

MUS  108H   

 Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Nyoman Suadin

M . . . .

6:30pm-8:30pm

OLIN 305

PART

1 credit  Class size: 20

 

15259

MUS  108J   

 Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

. T . . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM N211

PART

1 credit  Class size: 15

 

15277

MUS  108N   

 Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:40pm-6:40pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credit s This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composer’s works, ranging from sextet to big band.  This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music.  There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester.  Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed.  Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer.  Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting.  Class size: 12

 

15243

MUS  108P   AB

 Ensemble: Baroque

Alexander Bonus

. . W . .

4:40pm-6:40pm

BLM 117

PART

2 credits  Performance ensemble focusing on music from 1600-1750. Requires an audition for acceptance.  Class size: 14

 

15251

MUS  108R   

 Bard Georgian Choir

Maria Sonevytsky

Su . . . .

6:30pm-8:30pm

BDH

PART

1 credit  The Bard Georgian Choir is an all-vocal group that studies and performs traditional polyphonic songs from the Republic of Georgia (former USSR). Most songs are taught orally, and no previous singing experience or music reading skills are required. Special vocal techniques are also explored, including ornamented singing and yodeling. The group performs concerts at the end of each semester. Carl Linich, the choir’s director, has been a scholar, teacher and acclaimed performer of Georgian polyphonic singing since 1990, and is a founding member of Trio Kavkasia. Class size: 15

 

15531

MUS  108 CV

BEGINNER SAMBA Ensemble

Maria Sonevytsky

. . . . F

2:00pm -4:00pm

BLM N211

PART

1 credit  Samba Ensemble provides the opportunity to learn exotic Brazilian rhythms (samba, maracatu, batucada, samba reggai).

 

15532

MUS  108 CV

ADVANCED SAMBA Ensemble

Maria Sonevytsky

. . . . F

12:00pm -2:00pm

BLM N211

PART

1 credit  See above.

 

 

 

15280

MUS  122   

Introduction to Music Theory

and BAsic musicianship

Blair McMillen

. T . . .

. . . Th .

3:10pm-4:30pm

11:50am-1:10pm

BITO 210

BITO 210

PART

This course will serve as an introduction to reading, studying, and analyzing tonal music. Introduction to Music Theory is geared toward non-music majors as well as potential music majors who have had little or no exposure to reading music. We will begin with the basics of musical notation, progressing to the identification of scales, triads, and seventh chords.  (This course does not count towards the theory requirement for the music program.) Class size: 20 

 

15274

MUS  142   

 Introduction to Western Music

Peter Laki

. T . Th .

10:10am- 11:30am

BLM N217

AART

By presenting selected masterpieces in the Western tradition, this course will seek to demonstrate some of the ways in which music communicates with the listener. In the process, a number of basic concepts underlying musical form and structure will be clarified.  Students will be encouraged to bring their own favorite works to class for general discussion. This non-technical course requires no previous training in music.  Class size: 20

 

15264

MUS  172   

 Jazz Harmony II

John Esposito

M . W . .

9:40am- 11:30am

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  Part II - This course will include acquisition of the basic skills that make up the Foundation of all jazz styles.  We will also study the Jazz Language from the BEBOP ERA up to the 60’s. This course fulfills a music theory/performance requirement for music majors.  Class size: 25

 

15255

MUS  190   

 Death Set to Music

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

11:50am-1:10pm

BLM N217

AART

This course will discuss and analyze a number of key musical works that use death and mourning as subject matter. Works to be analyzed will include the Requiems of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Giuseppe Verdi, Johannes Brahms, Benjamin Britten and Paul Hindemith.  Other works will include Johann Sebastian Bach’s Johannes-Passion, and Ich habe genug (Cantata 82). Evaluation will be based on two exams and a research paper. This course fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 10

 

15268

MUS  202   

 Music Theory II / Ear Training

Kyle Gann / Erika Allen

M . W . .

. T . Th .

1:30pm-2:50pm

1:30pm-2:50pm

BLM N217

BLM N217

PART

Continuation of Music Theory I, introduction to harmony, various seventh chords, secondary dominants, basics of modulation, four-part writing and voice-leading.  End result: ability to write a hymn, song or brief movement of tonal music.  Theoretical work will be complemented by ear-training classes focused on the singing and recognition of harmonies, score-reading and rhythmic studies. Prerequisite: Music Theory I or equivalent (knowledge of scales and keys).  This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.  *Note: course will meet 4 days weekly, two days cover theory, 2 days cover ear-training.)  

Class size: 20

 

15266

MUS  211   

 Jazz in Literature I

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:10am- 11:30am

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies  This course presents some of the short stories and poems by Rudolph Fisher, Langston Hughes, Ann Petry, and Julio Cortazar. The text used in this section is ‘Hot and Cool’ by Marcela Briton and the ‘Harlem Renaissance Reader’, edited by David Lewis.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for the music program. Class size: 16

 

15247

MUS  220   

 Repertoire for Classical Voice II

Erika Switzer

M . W . .

10:10am- 11:30am

BDH

AART

This class surveys the vast and diverse 20th- and 21st-century repertoire for classical solo vocalist, beginning with works of the late-Romantic era and 2nd Viennese school through to the latest works of contemporary American composers.  Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of trends in composition and structure, the intersection of poetry and music, and the art of concert programing and repertoire selection.  Highly recommended for voice majors and for pianists interested in vocal collaboration, as well as for those who appreciate the work of the classically trained voice. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their written work in the form of short essays, programming assignments, and a final paper, as well as in-class presentations. Class size: 10

 

15474

ANTH  220   

 doing ethnography: music and sound

Maria Sonevytsky

. T . Th .

3:10 pm – 4:30pm

BLUM N217

SSCI

Cross-listed: Music  What are the ethical stakes, practical questions, and methodological tools that we use when we do ethnography? This course is a survey of and practicum in ethnographic field methods with a particular focus on ethnographic studies of sound and music. We will survey and critique traditional methods of ethnographic engagement such as participant-observation, interviews, archival research, visual, sonic and textual analysis, and address the challenges of doing fieldwork in a variety of contexts, including the virtual domain. Intensive writing exercises will raise important questions about how qualitative research can be ethically and effectively “translated” into written text. Students will develop an ethnographic research project of their own design throughout the course of the semester that may be connected to an ethnographically-grounded senior project. This course satisfies the field methods requirement needed for moderation into anthropology and ethnomusicology.  Class size: 22

 

15245

MUS  227   

 Explorations in World Music

Maria Sonevytsky

. T . Th .

10:10am- 11:30am

BDH

AART

This course takes an ethnomusicological approach to the study of musical traditions from throughout the globe, asking questions about how music makes meaning and is made meaningful in diverse social locations and cultural contexts. Topics will include: music as ritual, performance practices and systems of traditional musics, the commodification of “world music,” and cross-cultural notions of musical talent. Students will develop skills to write, think and listen musically. The course will include a variety of informal and formal written assignments, including a final research paper and presentation on a topic of the student’s choosing. Pre-requisite: one semester of music theory or familiarity with basic Western musical terms and systems.  Class size: 22

 

15285

MUS  252   

 ElectrONIc, Electroacoustic & CompUTER MUSIC COMPOSITION

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM N119

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing, original work in the form of recordings, scores, and/or digital realizations. These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members. Installation and inter-media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Lucier, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor. This fulfills music theory requirement.  Class size: 15

 

15278

MUS  257   

 Production & Reproduction

Bob Bielecki

. . W . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM 117

PART

This course will focus on the theory and practice of sound recording. Students will learn the use of recording equipment including digital tape recorders, mixing consoles, signal processing devices, and microphones. A/B listening tests will be used to compare types of microphones, microphone placement and many different recording techniques. ProTools software will be available for digital editing and mastering to CD. Assigned projects will include both multitrack and direct to stereo recordings of studio and concert performances. Class size: 12

 

15265

MUS  266C   

 Jazz RepERTORY: BEBOP Masters

John Esposito

M . W . .

11:50am-1:10pm

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies  This performance based course is a survey of the principal composers and performers of the BEBOP Era.  Musicians included are Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro, Bud Powell, Max Roach and others.  The course will include readings, recorded music and films.  The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony I or permission of instructor. This can be taken as a companion course with Jazz Harmony II. This course counts towards the music history/performance requirement for the music program. 

Class size: 12

 

15273

MUS  268   

 LitERATURE & Language of Music III

Peter Laki

M . W . .

3:10pm-4:30pm

BLM N217

AART

This course will explore selected musical masterpieces of the late Romantic and early Modernist periods (roughly 1870's to 1920).  The composers to be treated in depth are Wagner, Bruckner, Strauss, Debussy, Stravinsky, Mahler, Schoenberg, Webern, and Berg.  Particular emphasis will be given to Wagner and his legacy and to the musical activities in fin-de-siecle Vienna around the circles of Mahler and Schoenberg.  Operas by Wagner, Debussy, Strauss, and Berg will be examined.   Classroom discussions will focus on the style and organization of individual pieces, as well as on issues of biographical, cultural, and historical context.  There will be an attempt for

comprehensive chronological coverage, but rather we will consider a representative variety of genres and of compositional, aesthetic, and biographical concerns. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a series of short essays and listening exams.  As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are helpful, but not essential.  This course is primarily designed for first and second year students and counts toward the music history requirement of the music program.  It is not necessary to have taken earlier components of the Language and Literature of Music. Class size: 20

 

15286

MUS  270   

THE MUSIC AND WRITINGS OF Stockhausen, Nono & Cage

Richard Teitelbaum

. . W . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM N119

AART

Karlheinz Stockhausen and Luigi Nono were two major leaders of the post-war European avant-garde. Great composers both, they came from very different backgrounds--Stockhausen, a German Catholic, Nono an Italian Communist, but both espoused serialism early on, before turning away from it's strict application to expand their horizons in far freer directions. In this respect, the work of John Cage was a major influence. Coming from California and strongly influenced by Asian thought and his own anarchic American ideas of chance and indeterminacy,  Cage offered a radically opposing view to the strictures of totally organized serialism. By the end of their lives, Stockhausen had devoted himself to his massive mystical opera" Licht " and Nono to very soft and delicate works like his opera Prometeo. All three composers utilized both acoustic and electronic media in their works as well as theatrical and multimedia techniques, breaking new ground in their efforts. Their writings explore new means as well. The works of all three will be analyzed and studied in detail. There will be a midterm and final paper.  Class size: 15

 

15242

MUS  328   

 A History of Rhythm:

FINDING THE BEAT IN EUROPEAN MUSIC, FROM 1000 TO 2000 CE

Alexander Bonus

. . W . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM N210

AART

“In the Beginning, there was Rhythm,” states the opening of an influential nineteenth-century study on time, motion, and labor. Although catchy, the adage is utterly fallacious. As this course attempts to show, there was never agreement about the phenomenon of “Rhythm” in the whole of human history. Musical rhythm, like time, is more accurately considered a relativity -- notions of musical motion, pulse, and meter vary across locations, communities, and individuals. Indeed, musical time changes over the course of time itself. In a History of Rhythm, students will discover various definitions for “The Beat,” multiple meanings and practices that dictated “good rhythm” within various musical cultures. Weekly lectures focus on historical musical notation, pedagogical techniques, compositional trends, and performance practices. The class will also analyze musical manuscripts and first editions by Machaut, Monteverdi, Vivaldi, Beethoven, Stravinsky, and others. An ability to read music is required. Through the student's successful completion of a final project, this course can fulfill either the music history or theory requirement.  Class size: 14

 

15267

MUS  335   

 Jazz: The Freedom Principle III

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies, American Studies  The third part of a four-part course in Jazz History. This section is a study of modern jazz from 1937 to 1950. Emphasis will focus on modern musicians such as Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, Dizzy Gillispie and Max Roach. We will examine the solo and combo style of these musicians. Also we will examine how the music developed from Swing to Bebop. This will be illustrated with recordings and films. This course employs a cultural approach designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music through the 40’s, such as World War II, Jim Crow laws in the south and the recording industry strike. Classroom discussions will focus on the different styles of each musician. Students will be evaluated by written assignments and oral presentations. This course reaches out to anyone with an interest in Jazz and would like to get a better understanding of the music and its effect on our culture in the last 100 years.  Enrollment limited.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 15

 

15244

MUS  342   

 “VIVA LA LIBERTÀ!”: Mozart's Opera & THE Enlightenment

Christopher Gibbs

. T . . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM N210

AART

Mozart is often viewed as embodying central ideals of the Enlightenment and nowhere is this more apparent than in his mature operas. The seminar will focus on six of them, beginning with the relatively early Idomeneo and The Abduction from the Seraglio, centering on his trilogy from the mid-1780s composed to librettos by Lorenzo Da Ponte (The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Così fan Tutte), and concluding with The Magic Flute. These works take us from a teenager breaking with operatic conventions to his dying months, at age 35. He engaged with both Italian and German operas, comedy and tragedy, exoticism, gender issues, and radical politics of the day—the time of the American and French revolutions. We will consider the literary sources (most importantly Beaumarchais’s Le mariage de Figaro). Class sessions will be supplemented with screenings of film and video performances directed by Ingmar Bergman, Joseph Losey, Peter Sellars, and others. This course counts toward music history credit for College and Conservatory students. Class size: 12

 

15261

MUS  345   

 Introductory Psychoacoustics

Robert Bielecki

. T . . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM N110

AART

"Reality is a myth, perception is what matters".  This course will examine auditory perception and hearing and serve as an introduction to how hearing works. The first half of the semester begins with a description of the physiology and function of the ear and how we process auditory information.   Some topics include: perception of pitch, loudness, location, auditory illusions, critical bands, masking, threshold of hearing, hearing loss, and audiometry.   The second half of the semester will focus on sound localization and the technologies used in spatialization and 3-D audio. We will explore auditory localization cues, HRTF, binaural recording, spatial audio synthesis, sound for virtual realities and immersive environments. This course should be of particular interest to anyone involved in music and audio technology.  This course fulfills music theory requirements.  Class size: 15

 

15260

MUS  346   

Interactive Performance  & ComposITION

Robert Bielecki

. . . Th .

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM N119

PART

MAX/MSP is an object oriented graphical programming environment for algorithmic music composition, interactivity, live processing, multimedia and more.  This course covers beginning, intermediate, and advanced methods of using MAX/MSP.  This will be a hands-on course with examples from artist’s work, several programming assignments and a final project.  Knowledge of computer programming and MIDI is not necessary, but would be helpful. This fulfills music theory requirements. Class size: 15

 

15275

MUS  356   

 Jazz  Arranging Techniques II

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00pm-9:00pm

BLM N211

PART

This composition class will focus on the various techniques used in jazz ensemble writing from trio to quintet ensembles with heavy emphasis on rhythm section arranging. Final projects will be recorded or performed live at the end of the semester. This is an advanced seminar class for moderated music majors. Prerequisite are Jazz Composition I and II or the permission of the instructor.  Class size: 15

 

15289

MUS  360   

 20th CENTURY Compositional TechniquES

George Tsontakis

M . . . .

10:10am- 12:30pm

BLM N217

AART

A course in composing based on historical models. The first decade of the 20th century saw an explosion of innovative compositional theories and directions. Led by Debussy and pre-serial Schoenberg, composers began to reshape the future of music. Harmonic symmetries commingled with traditional diatonic and chromatic practices brought new colors, textures, form and freedom, leading to the wide array of musical styles and aesthetics heard today. A course in listening and analysis of selected seminal works, from Debussy to Messiaen and Ligeti, in their historical context. This course counts toward music theory credit. Written analysis of works covered; students will present to the class on selected pieces; some imitative theoretical composition similar to what is expected in traditional harmony classes. Class size: 8

 

15613

MUS  366A   

 ADVANCED CONTEMPORARY JAZZ TechniquES

John Esposito

 . . Th .

10:10am- 12:30pm

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies  This course introduces methods for the jazz improviser to deconstruct and reorganize the basic harmonic and rhythmic elements for a composition.  Issues addressed will include reharmonization, remetering, metric modulation, variations in phrasing, tempo, and dynamics; that is, the arrangement and reorganization of compositional elements.  This is performance-oriented class and repertoire will include jazz standards and compositions of the instructor.  This class is open to moderated upper college students who have successfully completed Jazz Harmony I and II, and previous jazz repertory classes.  This course fulfills an upper level music theory requirement for music majors. Class size: 15  This course counts towards the music theory/performance requirement for the music program. Class size: 15

 

 

MUSIC WORKSHOPS:

Workshops carry 2 credits, unless otherwise noted.

 

15272

MUS  WKSH   GKM

 Sonata & Chamber Workshop

Erica Kiesewetter /

Marka Gustavsson /

Blair McMillen

. T . . .

4:00pm-6:00pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This workshop will explore the wide repertoire of sonatas with instrument and piano, as coached by the professors. Students may sign up as a pre-formed group or be placed. Open to college and conservatory students by recommendation or audition.  Class size: 12

 

15287

MUS  WKSHA   

 Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M . . . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class  and then to Conservatory players as well as the Da Capo Chamber Players who record and play these pieces.  All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should email Prof. Tower prior to registration to determine eligibility. Class size: 8

 

15269

MUS  WKSHB   

 Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . W . .

4:00pm-7:00pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration.  Students choose one of the three sessions.  Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart  by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration.  Students choose one of three sections.  Students choose a section from the three options. Class size: 18

 

15263

MUS  WKSHD   

 Sight Reading Workshop

John Esposito

. T . . .

12:00pm-1:00pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  This workshop is designed to improve basic music reading skills.  Drawing from a varied selection of material such as lead sheets, jazz fake

book charts and simple to intermediate classical etudes, students learn to read melody and rhythm more confidently. This course works well for C

(concert) instruments and may be adapted for other instruments as well.  Class size: 14

 

15254

MUS  WKSHL   

 Workshop: Opera Workshop

Teresa Buchholz /

Rufus Muller /

Ilka LoMonaco

. . W . .

4:40pm-7:00pm

BDH

PART

2 credits   Part II of Opera Workshop which began In the Fall Semester. We prepare a themed program of operatic excerpts (choruses, ensembles, solos), which is performed in the Fisher Center, fully staged and with orchestra,  in the early part of the Spring Semester. Typically this involves intensive rehearsals during the week before Spring Semester, and evening rehearsals in the first week of semester. Students enrolling in the Fall Semester for two credits thus commit themselves to the final rehearsals and performances in the Spring Semester, which earn them an additional two credits.  Enrollment is by audition. Please contact Professors Müller (rumu2000@earthlink.net) and LoMonaco (ilka98@aol.com) for details. Class size: 30

 

15253

MUS  WKSHM   

 Hands Across the Sea: Art Song on both sides of the atlantic

Rufus Muller

M . . . .

4:40pm-7:00pm

BITO HALL

PART

2 credits Song recitals are often stale or overwrought.  In this performance-oriented course for singers and pianists, we shall study English-language art songs by American and British composers from all eras, with a particular emphasis on how to engage vividly and naturally with an audience.  As well, the course will provide guidance on British and American diction and style. Class size: 12

 

15276

MUS  WKSP4   

 Workshop: Jazz Improvisation II

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:40pm-7:40pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  This class is structured as a continuation of Jazz Improvisation I. The goal will be to gain mastery over all of the basic scales used in traditional jazz improvisation, and to attain the ability to improvise over basic two-five patterns and simple modal progressions. Prerequisite:  Jazz Improvisation Workshop I, or consent of the instructor.  Class size: 14

 

15282

MUS  WKSP7   

 Jazz Vocal Workshop

John Esposito

. . . Th .

2:00pm-4:30pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  Beginning level course:  The Jazz Vocal Workshop is a performance workshop designed to familiarize the beginning singer with the components of a successful jazz performance.  How to begin a song (intros) and how to end a song (outros and turnarounds), how to pick a key, a song and a tempo.  How to utilize simple (and not so simple) arrangements.  Particular attention is paid to phrasing.  The language of scat singing, with emphasis on practice in every class.  The forms of the blues, rhythm changes and 32 bar song form, and practical applications taken from The Great American Songbook.  There is one (or more) concert(s) scheduled during the semester and students are encouraged to seek out and perform in many local venues.  There is a final exam in this class.   Class size: 16

 

15326

MUS  WKSPO   

 Intro to Electronic Music

Marina Rosenfeld

. . . . F

1:30pm-3:50pm

BLM N119

PART

4 credits This hands-on workshop will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog tools and processes. Students will be introduced to foundational practices in electro-acoustic sound production and their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on signal processing, studio and field recording, and modes of diffusion, including multichannel installation and live performance, as well as receive instruction in ProTools for multi-track recording, editing, and mixing. Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring contemporary approaches to electronic music software and technology. Enrollment in this course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios. In addition to the digital workstations, students can also explore analog synthesis techniques using the vintage Serge modular synthesizer. Class size: 20

 

15248

MUS  WKSPR   

 Vocal Collaboration for Pianists

Erika Switzer

M . . . .

1:30pm-4:30pm

BDH

PART

2 credits Open to pianists of the College and Conservatory programs, this course introduces students to vocal collaboration.  With the assistance of guest singers and conductors, students will have the opportunity to study and play music from the operatic, oratorio and song repertoires.  Skills in listening, poetic interpretation, and coaching will be developed.  This course prepares students to join Bard’s Opera Workshop as rehearsal pianists and to partner undergraduate vocal majors in moderation and senior project recitals.  It also counts for chamber music credit for Conservatory pianists. Class size: 8

 

 

SPECIAL PROJECTS:

 

Special Projects are designed for music majors to pursue individual or group projects with a particular professor.  Contact the professor with whom you would like to work for details.

 

 

PRIVATE LESSONS – (register for lessons with a drop/add form.)

Please Note:   In order to receive credit for lessons a student must be enrolled in an ensemble or performance class. There is a $150.00 Private Lesson Fee each semester for any student taking private lessons.  If a student decides to drop private lessons they must fill out a Drop/Add form, have it signed by the appropriate department faculty and deliver it to the Office of the Registrar on or before Wednesday, February 11, 2015 PM or they will be charged and responsible for the $150.00 Department Fee. Students who opt to take lessons not-for-credit will be responsible for the full cost of the lessons themselves.  Not available for on-line registration. Please note: you can audit an ensemble, but you cannot audit lessons. Private Lessons are offered as follows:

 

Ø  Erika Allen – classical piano

Ø  David Arner - piano (jazz, classical and improvisation)

Ø  Teresa Buchholz – classical voice

Ø  Ira Coleman - jazz bass

Ø  Mike DiMicco - jazz guitar

Ø  Daniel Fishkin-  Serge modular synthesizer

Ø  Laura Flax – clarinet

Ø  Greg Glassman - jazz trumpet

Ø  Marka Gustavsson – violin, viola

Ø  Stephen Hammer - oboe and recorder

Ø  Ryan Kamm - classical bass

Ø  Erica Kiesewetter – violin

Ø  Ilka LoMonaco- classical voice

Ø  Blair McMillen - piano

Ø  Garfield Moore – cello

Ø  Rufus Müller – classical voice

Ø  Peter O'Brien - jazz drums

Ø  Isabelle O’Connell - piano

Ø  Pamela Pentony - voice (jazz)

Ø  Patricia Spencer – flute

Ø  Erika Switzer – classical piano

Ø  John Thomas - trumpet (classical and jazz)

Ø  Francesca Tanksley – jazz piano

Ø  Carlos Valdez – Latin jazz percussion and drums

Ø  Bruce Williams - jazz and classical saxophone