15424

LAIS  / HIST 120   

 ModERn Latin america since IndepENDENCE

Miles Rodriguez

M . W . .

10:10am- 11:30am

OLIN 305

HIST/DIFF

Cross-listed:  History  This is an introductory survey of the history of Modern Latin America since Independence. The course traces the process of Independence of the Latin American nations from the Spanish and Portuguese Empires in North and South America in the early nineteenth century, and the long-term, contested, and often violent processes of nation-formation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Primary source and historical texts examine the region’s main challenges in this period, including persistent inequality, regional disintegration, endemic violence, elite political control, revolution, military rule, and civil reconciliation. Major historical issues and debates for study and discussion include the meaning and uses of the idea of “Latin America,” slavery and empire in nineteenth-century Brazil, and the roles of race, religion, women, and indigenous peoples in Latin American societies. Class size: 20

 

15363

LAIS / HIST  339   

 Cuba & THE Spanish Caribbean in global perspective: sugar, slavery & revolution

Miles Rodriguez

. . W . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

HEG 200

HIST/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies, Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights, LAIS The Americas began in the Caribbean and its islands were at the origin of Latin America. In the Caribbean, global empires established African slavery and the first sugar plantations in the “New World.” Sugar soon became a tropical commodity for local production and global consumption. The Spanish Empire, the first major empire in the Caribbean in the sixteenth century, reasserted its power there in the nineteenth century. The Spanish colonial legacies of sugar, slavery, and revolution influenced Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico through the twentieth century and continue to influence these countries today. This seminar explores global connections and hybridities involving sugar, slavery, and revolution in the Spanish Caribbean, from the nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. The seminar focuses on the world’s sugar made after slavery in Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico under United States influence in the first half of the twentieth century to the Cuban Revolution. Class size: 15

 

15291

ARTH  160   

 Survey of Latin american Art

Susan Aberth

M . W . .

11:50am-1:10pm

OLIN 102

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: LAIS (core course) Related interest:  Africana Studies, Theology    A broad overview of art and cultural production in Latin America, including South and Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. The survey will commence with an examination of major pre-Columbian civilizations and a field trip to the Metropolitan Museum.  This is followed by an examination of the contact between Europe and the Americas during the colonial period, the Independence movements and art of the 19th century, and finally the search for national identity in the modern era. All students welcome. (Art History requirement: Americas)  Class size: 25

 

15399

ANTH  201   

 Gender & Sexuality in Latin america

Diana Brown

M . W . .

1:30pm-2:50pm

OLIN 205

SSCI/DIFF

 

15870

HIST  2315   

 HOW TO WAGE WAR IN COLONIAL AMERICA

Christian Crouch

M . W . .

11:50am-1:10pm

OLIN LC 206

HIST

 

15539

PS  222   

 LATIN AMERICAn POLITICS AND SOCIETY

Omar Encarnacion

M . W . .

11:50am- 1:10pm

OLIN 301

SSCI

 

15616

SPAN  110   

 ACCELERATED Spanish I

Hilda Puig

M T W Th .

8:50am-9:50am

OLINLC 120

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   A first-year course designed for the student who has had some prior exposure to Spanish or who has excellent command of another Romance language. All the major topics in grammar will be covered, and the course will provide intensive practice in the four skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing). The course will provide a streamlined review of basic topics in grammar and provide more detail and exercises for advanced topics. The textbook will be supplemented with authentic video material from Spain and 'Latin America. One additional hour per week of practice with the Spanish tutor and a substantial amount of work in the language resource center will also be required. The course will prepare the student for summer language programs abroad or Spanish 201 the following semester. Prospective students should contact Professor Nicholson at nicholso@bard.edu. Class size: 18

 

15054

SPAN  201   

 Intermediate Spanish I

Melanie Nicholson

M T W Th .

8:50am-9:50am

OLINLC 210

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   For students who have completed Spanish 106, 110, or the equivalent  (two or three solid years of high school Spanish). This course is designed to perfect the student's command of all four language skills (speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing). This will be achieved through an intensive grammar review, conversational practice, reading of modern Spanish texts, writing simple compositions, and language lab work. Permission of the instructor required for students who have not completed Spanish 106 or 110 at Bard. Class size: 20

 

15055

SPAN  202   

 Intermediate Spanish II

Nicole Caso

M . W . .

. . . Th .

10:10am- 11:30am

10:10am- 11:30am

OLIN 202

OLIN 308

FLLC

Cross-listed: LAIS  This course continues refining the student's mastery of the four basic skills in Spanish at a post-intermediate level. The textbook offers an integration of literature, culture, and film. Our study of both visual and written texts focuses on critical thinking, interpretation, speaking, and writing skills. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or equivalent; permission of instructor required for those who have not completed 201 at Bard. Class size: 20

 

15056

SPAN  240   

 Testimonies of Latin america

Nicole Caso

M . W . .

11:50am-1:10pm

OLIN 202

FLLC/DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender & Sexuality Studies; Human Rights (core course); LAIS  This course provides the opportunity for students to engage critically with texts that serve as a public forum for voices often silenced in the past. Students will also learn about the broader context of the hemisphere's history through the particular experiences of women from Bolivia, Guatemala, Argentina, Mexico, and the U.S.-Latino community, including Rigoberta Menchú, Domitila Barrios de Chungara, and Cherríe Moraga.  We will read testimonial accounts documenting the priorities and concerns of women who have been marginalized for reasons of poverty, ethnic difference, political ideologies, or sexual preference.  The semester will be devoted to analyzing the form in which their memories are represented textually, and to the discussion of the historical circumstances that have led to their marginalization.  Some of the central questions that will organize our discussions are: how to represent memories of violence and pain? What are the ultimate effects of mediations of the written word, translations to hegemonic languages, and the interventions of well-intentioned intellectuals?  How best to use writing as a mechanism to trace a space for dignity and "difference"?  We will integrate films that portray the issues and time-periods documented in the diaries and testimonial narratives to be read - including "Men With Guns", "El Norte," "Historia oficial," and "Rojo amanecer."  Conducted in English. Class size: 20

 

15015

SPAN  301   

 Introduction to Spanish Literature

Patricia Lopez-Gay

M . W . .

3:10pm-4:30pm

OLINLC 120

FLLC

This course explores some of the major literary works produced on the Iberian Peninsula from the Middle Ages to the present day. Students will become familiar with the general contours of Spanish history as they study in depth a selected number of masterpieces, including works by Miguel de Cervantes, Calderón de la Barca, Teresa de Jesús, Cadalso, Larra, Galdós, Emilia PardoBazán, Unamuno, Lorca, and Carmen Laforet. The course will be organized around three thematic modules: Spanish culture’s engagement with notions of purity and pollution; the emergence and evolution of the first person singular in Spanish literature; and the representations of the country and the city, the center and the periphery. In each module we will undertake a survey of relevant literature occasionally put in conversation with the visual arts. Conducted in Spanish.  Class size: 14

 

15058

SPAN  306   

 Five Latin american Poets

Melanie Nicholson

. T . Th .

11:50am-1:10pm

OLIN 310

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   This course will examine the work of five twentieth-century Latin American poets:  Pablo Neruda (Chile), César Vallejo (Peru), Octavio Paz (Mexico), Nicolás Guillén (Cuba) and Alejandra Pizarnik (Argentina).  Although students will be asked to read extensively within the obra of each of these writers, class time will be mainly spent in close analysis of selected texts.  Outside readings will help orient students to the historical, social, and political contexts in which these writers produced their work.  In this regard, we will attempt to answer these and other questions:  What occasioned the shift, in Neruda and Vallejo, from a vanguardist, hermetic poetry to a more accessible and socially-oriented poetry?  How are Eastern religious and philosophical orientations, particularly those of Buddhism, manifested in the work of Paz?  In what ways does the poetry of Guillén respond to racial and socio-political issues crucial to an understanding of Cuba's history?  How can we apply contemporary discourses concerning gender and the representation of the body to the poetry of Pizarnik?  In addition to writing critical essays, students will be asked to memorize and recite short poems.  Class size: 15

 

15057

SPAN  345   

 ENGAGING The Other in LatIN amerICAN Theory

Nicole Caso

. T . . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

OLINLC 115

FLLC

Cross-listed: Human Rights, LAIS   Whether considered an opportunity for national enrichment or an obstacle to assimilation and progress, the encounter among multiple cultures in Latin America has made it a fertile terrain for theorizing about the self and the other. In this seminar we will trace various ways in which “the problem of the Other” has been addressed in twentieth and twenty-first century writings by a vast array of thinkers: anthropologists, literary critics, politicians, art historians and intellectuals from indigenous communities. Starting with Fernando Ortiz and Angel Rama’s subsequent use of the concept of “Transculturation,” we will then analyze the implications and effects of “Indigenismo” in post-revolutionary Mexico. Nestor GarcíaCanclini’s thoughts on “Hybridity” will inform Antonio CornejoPolar’s turn to notions of “Heterogeneity” when addressing representations of Latin American identity in the cultural realm. We will follow the Latin American Subaltern Studies group’s reading of South Asian models of thinking about the subaltern. Walter Mignolo, AníbalQuijano and others will help guide our reading of the implications of the “Coloniality of Power” in the hemisphere. The semester will culminate with writings from indigenous intellectuals from Guatemala, Mexico, and the Andean region as they enter the discussion of cultural diversity and the elaboration of socio-cultural constructs with direct repercussions on policy and implications how people are perceived and treated.  Conducted in Spanish.  Class size: 14