15176

FILM  116   

 History of Cinema since 1945

Richard Suchenski

 

               Screening:

. T . Th .

 

. . W . .

11:50am-1:10pm

 

Begins @ 7:00pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Designed for first year students, this course (the second part of a two-part survey) will address the history of cinema since the end of the Second World War, In addition to offering an interdisciplinary look at the development and significance of the cinema during this period, we will consider the nature and function of film form through lectures, discussions, the reading of key texts, and close study of works by exemplary directors such as Rossellini, Hitchcock, Brakhage, Bresson, Tati, Resnais, Godard, Bergman, Kurosawa, Tarkovsky, Kubrick, Fassbinder and Jia.  Special focus will be paid to film’s relationship to related arts and to the larger history of culture.  Attendance and participation is assumed and there will be a midterm exam, two short papers, and a final examination.  Class size: 25

 

15185

FILM  167   

 Survey of Electronic Art

Ed Halter

 

               Screening:

. . . . F

 

. . . Th .

10:10am-1:10pm

 

7:00pm- 10:00pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society;  Open to First-year students only. An introductory lecture course on the history of moving-image art made with electronic media, from the earliest computer-generated films, through television, the portable video camera, the internet, and gaming. Topics include analog versus digital, guerrilla television, expanded cinema, feminist media, video and performance, internet art, video installation, and the question of video games as art. Requirements include two short essays and a final in-class exam or final research paper.  Class size: 25

 

15312

FILM / THTR  203   

 Directing Seminar

Jonathan Rosenberg

. T . Th .

10:10am- 11:30am

FISHER RESNICK

PART

See Theater section for description.

 

15180

FILM  203   

ELECTRONIC MEDIA:

Performance & Video

Ben Coonley

. . W . .

10:10am-1:10pm

AVERY 117

PART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities, Theater  This course explores intersections of video and performance art. Course participants develop ways of using video's most fundamental property: its ability to reproduce a stream of real-time synchronized images and sounds. How does video technology mediate between on-screen performer and audience? How can artists interested in creating critical and self-reflexive media respond to video’s immediacy and “liveness”? How can performance artists use video playback devices, displays, projectors, and interactive elements to shape and enhance live art? Course participants will work on individual projects using cameras, monitors, switchers, surveillance systems, projectors, and software-based video mixers. The first half of the course concentrates on the creation of performance “tapes” (or tape-less video documents) and the history of experimental video focused on framing staged live activities. The second half of the course concentrates on the use of video as a central component within live art events, plus a continued discussion about the larger cultural and psychological impact of live video production. Readings on and viewings of work by Nam Jun Paik, Andy Warhol, Joan Jonas, Martha Rosler, Laurie Anderson, Richard Serra, Chris Burden, John Baldessari, Bruce Nauman, Gilbert & George, George Kuchar, William Wegman, Michael Smith, Walid Raad, Wynne Greenwood, Shana Moulton, Eileen Maxson, Ryan Trecartin, Xander Marro, Miranda July, Sadie Benning, Jeremy Bailey, Paper Rad, Harry Dodge and Stanya Kahn. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

15181

FILM  205   

 Gesture, Light & Motion

Kelly Reichardt

. . W . .

1:30pm-4:30pm

AVERY 333

PART

A filmmaking workshop introducing the student to the narrative form through the qualities of gesture, light and motion on screen. Focusing on these elements above dialogue and literary approaches to storytelling allows the filmmaker to develop expressive control  to communicate a deep sense of character.  Approaches to visual storytelling, examination of narrative strategies, hands-on shooting, and solutions of practical and/or aesthetic problems, as they are encountered in the making of a film. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

15183

FILM  207   

 Introduction to Video PRODUCTION

Pacho Velez

. . W .  .

1:30pm-4:30pm

AVERY 217

PART

This course is designed to introduce you to various elements of video production with an emphasis on video art and experimentation.  The class culminates with the completion of a single channel video piece by each student.  To facilitate this final project, there will be a number of camera and editing assignments that are designed to familiarize you with digital video technology while investigating various aesthetic and theoretical concepts. Class sessions will consist of technology demonstrations, screenings, critiques and discussions. Technology training will include: cameras, Final Cut Pro, studio lighting and lighting for green screen, key effects, microphones and more. No prerequisites, permission from instructor. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

15184

FILM  208   

 Introduction to Film

Peter Hutton

. . . Th .

1:30pm-4:30pm

AVERY 319

PART

An introduction to filmmaking with a strong emphasis on mastering the 16mm Bolex camera. Students will be required to shoot six different assignments designed to address basic experimental, documentary, and narrative techniques. A wide range of technical and aesthetic issues will be explored in conjunction with editing, lighting, and sound recording techniques. No prerequisites, permission from instructor.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement. 

Class size: 13

 

15191

FILM  214   

 Post-War Italy & France

John Pruitt

 

             Screening:

. T . . .

 

M . . . .

1:30pm-4:30pm

 

6:00pm- 9:00pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

A lecture survey of two major cinematic schools in post-war Western Europe, both of which had enormous international influence at the time, an  influence which arguably can still be felt in contemporary film. We will study four concentrated historical moments of remarkably intense, creative activity: (1) the immediate post-war years in Italy of Neo-realism, dominated by Rossellini, Visconti and De Sica (2) the mid-fifties in France when Tati and Bresson are most impressive as "classicists";(3) the late fifties and early sixties of The French New Wave with the dawn of the directorial careers of Godard, Truffaut, Rivette, Varda, Rohmer, Chabrol et al., and the miraculous maturation of a number of key directors in Italy at roughly the same time, best represented by Fellini, Antonioni, Olmi and Pasolini. Required supplementary readings. Two essay exams and a term paper. Open enrollment.  Class size: 25

 

15186

FILM  223   

 Graphic Film Workshop

Peter Hutton

. . . . F

1:30pm-4:30pm

AVERY 319

PART

This course explores the materials and processes available for the production of graphic film or graphic film sequences. It consists of instruction in animation, rephotography, rotoscoping, and drawing on film and of viewing and discussing a number of films that are primarily concerned with the visual.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Interested students should contact Prof. Hutton (hutton@bard.edu) prior to registration.  Class size: 12

 

15189

FILM  / ANTH 224   

 Ethnography IN IMAGE, SOUND & TEXT

Jacqueline Goss /

Laura Kunreuther

. . . . F

. . . Th .

10:10am-1:10pm

5:00pm- 7:00pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 110

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities  The relation between self and others, the problems and pleasures of cross-cultural encounters, the sensory aspects of culture, the relation of subjectivity to broader institutional and ideological forces - these are all themes found in a range of productions that might be called ethnographic in nature.  In artistic circles there has been a turn towards work that is conceived as ethnographic in terms of deep engagement and immersion in a social world, while in anthropology there has been a turn towards representing sensory worlds in ethnographies that use media other than/in addition to traditional genres of ethnographic writing.  In this course, we will use the tools of anthropology -- participant-observation, interviews, and immersion - to create ethnographies in several different media, including film, video, audio, and experimental writing.  The course will introduce students to some of the basic assumptions and methods of ethnographic research while also viewing and listening to the work of filmmakers, audiographers, and anthropologists, including Jean Rouch, Raymond Birdwhistel, Trinh T. Minh-ha, Tracey Moffat, Peter Kubelka, Juan Downey, Robert Gardner, Margaret Mead, and John Marshall. The course will be co-taught by an anthropologist and filmmaker, who will each bring the expertise of their field to facilitate the making of ethnographical work in various media. Class size: 20

 

15059

LIT  232   

 Middle Eastern Cinemas

Dina Ramadan

                 Screenings:

. T . . .

. . . Th .

4:40 pm- 7:00pm

6:00pm-9:00pm

OLIN 205

PRE 110

FLLC

Cross-listed:  Film & Electronic Arts, Human Rights, Middle Eastern Studies  The history of cinema in the Middle East is as old as the art form itself; screenings of films by the Lumiere Brothers took place in Cairo, Alexandria, Algiers, Tunis, Fez, and Jerusalem just months after their initial screening. The “Orient” quickly became the location for early cinematic productions and cinemas sprang up across the region. This course begins with a survey of the development of national cinemas in the Middle East, before turning to a series of case studies of influential directors working on both documentary and features films. These will include Yusif Chahine, Abbas Kiarostami, Omar Amiralay, Avi Moghrabi, and Elia Suleiman. We will focus on transformations in stylistic and aesthetic approaches as well as examining the shifting place of cinema, the role of state sponsorship, the problem of censorship, and the question of audience. Finally, students will be exposed to the growing body of contemporary video artworks produced by younger practitioners from the region. All readings will be in English. Weekly evening screenings are mandatory.  Class size: 20

 

15193

FILM  233   

 Art & Internet

Ben Coonley

. T . . .

1:30pm-4:30pm

AVERY 333

PART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities; Science, Technology & Society   This production course considers the Internet as a source of creative material, an exhibition context, and begetter of new art forms. With reference to electronic media history and theory, we survey the contemporary landscape of online media production. Topics covered include: the origins of “net.art,” hypertext narratives, social networks, surf clubs and group blogging, web video, machinima, hacktivism, online games, online performance, digital readymade and assemblage art, among others. Students complete independent and collaborative creative projects designed to respond to and engage with Internet technologies and online networks. No special expertise with computers is required, but all work for the seminar will be produced using the digital media we study.  Class size: 12

 

15495

FILM  236   

Cinematic Romanticism

Richard Suchenski

 

                Screening:

. . W . .

 

. T . . .

1:30pm-4:30pm

 

Begins @ 7:00pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Cross-listed:  Art History  This course will offer an intensive exploration of the manifestations and permutations of Romanticism in cinema from the silent era to the present. Topics considered include the development of Romantic thought; the relationship between film and the other arts; the impact of nineteenth century aesthetic paradigms on twentieth and twenty-first century film practices; and the changing meanings of Romantic tropes and iconography in different historical moments. The course will be synchronized with a Center for Moving Image Arts program that will feature extensive retrospectives of work by Jean-Luc Godard and Werner Herzog. We will also carefully analyze films by directors such as F.W. Murnau, Abel Gance, Frank Borzage, King Vidor, Vincente Minnelli, Nicholas Ray, Stan Brakhage, Gregory Markopoulos, Jacques Rivette, Andrei Tarkovsky, Manoel de Oliveira, Terrence Malick, and Lars von Trier. Grades based on in-class discussion, short writing assignments, and a final research essay. Upper-college students who have taken courses in film criticism and history will have priority. Class size: 16

 

15174

FILM  256   

 Writing the Film

So Kim

M . . . .

1:30pm-4:30pm

AVERY 319

PART

Cross-listed: Written Arts  An introductory writing course that looks at creative approaches to writing short films and dialogue scenes. There will be writing and research exercises, screenings, discussions, readings and script critiques. The course will focus on researching and developing ideas and structure for stories, building characters, poetic strategies and writing comedic, realistic and awkward romantic dialogue.   Class size: 12

 

15192

FILM  311   

 Contemporary Narrative Film

John Pruitt

 

             Screening:

M . . . .

 

Su . . . .

1:30-4:30pm

 

6:00pm- 9:00pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 110

AART

An open-ended, investigative seminar into a select group of prominent, narrative filmmakers who are still active and whose international reputation has emerged within the last twenty-five or so years. A special emphasis will be placed on those artists whose work presents a particular challenge to or innovation in narrative form per se, to the extent that as they approach a kind of visual poetry, they place difficult demands upon the viewer to be a creative collaborator. The list of film screenings may be augmented or altered by current releases in the fall, or student interest as the course progresses, but it will certainly include films by the following: Jim Jarmusch, David Lynch, Abbas Kiarostami, Aleksandr Sokurov, Peggy Ahwesh, Claire Denis, Guy Maddin, Hou Hsaio-hsien, Michael Haneke, Lars von Trier, Peter Greenaway and Chantal Akerman. Two written projects: one short and one long. Limited course enrollment: Juniors and Seniors only; preference will be given to those students with background in film criticism and history.   Class size: 14

 

15175

FILM  312   

 Advanced Screenwriting

So Kim

. T . . .

10:10am-1:10pm

AVERY 217

PART

An intensive workshop designed specifically for someone who plans to make a film for moderation or senior project. In a seminar setting, we will work on: script analysis, staging,  re-writes, and a shooting script.  The goal will be to develop a concise and polished script to become the basis for a short film.  
Pre-requisite: Film256 - Writing the Film or the successful completion of a sophomore level production class.  Non-majors must email the professor prior to registration for approval. Class size: 12

 

15179

FILM  331   

 In the Archive

Peggy Ahwesh

 

             Screening:

. . W . .

 

. . W . .

10:10am-1:10pm

 

5:00pm-7:00pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 110

AART

Cross-listed:  Art History  Starting with readings from Derrida, Benjamin, Enwezor and Sekula among others on the archive, we will discuss the impulse to preserve, guardianship, access, the politics of collections and collective memory.  Various preservation models will be examined through visits to film archives, discussions with film preservationists and screenings.  A variety of work by contemporary artists who engage with the history and logic of the archive will be studied, such as Marcel Broodthaers, Joseph Cornell, Renee Green and Walid Raad.  As a group, we will establish dossiers (including: an interview, filmography, bibliography, catalogue of works) on a number of contemporary film/video makers, and begin to form an archive of significant experimental works and related materials at Bard for study, education and exhibition. Class size: 15

 

15182

FILM  344   

 Sound & Picture Editing

Kelly Reichardt

. . . Th .

10:10am-1:10pm

AVERY 333

PART

This course will explore the principles and practices of sound design in motion pictures. Through analysis of existing narrative sound works and through student's own sound creations, the class will explore the mutual influence of sound and picture. Over the semester, students will have the opportunity to deeply explore the editing process and discover how sound comes into play when making a cut.  In the first part of the semester, students will record and build layered tracks (ambient, foley, ADR) for sequences from existing films. In the second part of the semester, students will shoot their own footage to integrate with existing soundtracks. Students who wish to take the course should be familiar with the fundamentals of computer-based media and should be willing to share their work with others.  Class size: 12

 

15494

FILM  360   

 ASIA IN WESTERN EYES

Ian Buruma

 

            Screenings:

M . . . .

 

Su . . .

1:30 PM-4:30pm

 

6:00 – 9:00pm

AVERY 117

PRE 110

AART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies, Human Rights   This course will focus on Western movies, European and American, featuring Asia and Asians. Asia is defined as any country between India and Japan. The idea is to show students how stereotypes and cultural prejudices, not all of them necessarily negative, change with time. We will see the "exotic" Asian, the "spiritual" Asian, the "wise man" Asian, the "Geisha" or Madame Butterfly Asian, as well as Asia as a treacherous, dangerous place full of potential violence. Some of the movies feature Asian actors, as well as locations, such as Jean Renoir's The River (1951), or Max Ophuls's rare film shot in Japan, Yoshiwara. Others exemplify the old Hollywood convention of starring Western actors playing Indians or Chinese: Nicholas Ray's 55 Days in Peking (1963), or Peter Lorre as Mr. Moto. The aim of this course is to give students a greater sense of history, of cinema as well as of East-West relations, including, for example, the Vietnam War. There will be a reading list to go with the screenings, ranging from Pierre Loti's Madame Chrysanthemum to Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness (in relation of Francis Coppola's Apocalypse Now).  Each week three students will be required to give an approximately 10 minute presentation on screened films, as well as the readings, leading to a general class discussion. All students, apart from the three presenters, will be asked to respond to the film with short questions and comments submitted by email. Essays have to be completed by all students before the midterm break and the end of term. Questions will be set to give these papers a focus.  Class size: 12

 

15178

FILM  405   

 Senior Seminar

Peggy Ahwesh

. T . . .

5:00pm-7:00pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 110

 

A requirement for all majors, the Senior Seminar is an opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among students working on Senior Project. The course will have a number of film and video makers in to discuss their process and techniques, artistic life-after-Bard skills workshop, a review of distribution and grant writing opportunities and critique of works in progress. The course is an integral aspect of Senior Project for all seniors in Film. (Meets every other week.) Class size: 25