BARD COLLEGE COURSE LIST SPRING 2015 ADDENDUM

 

ADDITIONAL FIRST-YEAR SEMINARS

 

15851

FSEM II JL2

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR II

Alice Stroup

M . W . .

3:10pm-4:30pm

OLIN 107

 

 

15847

FSEM II AS3

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR II

Joseph Luzzi

. T. Th .

11:50am-1:10 pm

HEG 106

 

 

 

 

NEW COURSES

 

15870

HIST  2315   

 HOW TO WAGE WAR IN COLONIAL AMERICA

Christian Crouch

M . W . .

11:50am-1:10pm

OLIN LC 206

HIST

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies, American Studies, Experimental Humanities, French Studies, Human Rights, LAIS  Thousands of men march in a line towards cannons and muskets at point blank range. Abenakis watch the snow accumulate around the walls of an English fort, then scale over the defenses silently in the night to attack. En route to find the "Lost City of Gold," Spanish soldiers sack Acoma Pueblo and then flee. "Coromantees" and Irish servants challenge English slaveholders' dominion in Barbados and nearly succeed. Colonial America existed in a constant state of war. This course is a close study of formal and informal military conflicts from the 16th to the early 19th centuries, looking at well-known engagements such as the so-called "French and Indian War" and lesser known episodes, like the French and Abenaki raid on Deerfield in 1704. Students will learn how European and indigenous American rules of violence developed, shifted, and adapted in response to the Columbian Exchange, and how war came to shape contemporary American identity. In addition to primary sources, we will consider literary, cinematic, and live reenactment interpretations of colonial conflicts and consider what these tell us about the relationships of history and memory.  Class size: 22

 

15614

HUM 325

HOW TO FORM AN OPINION

Seth Lipsky

…Th.

1:30pm -3:50pm

ARENDT CENTER

 

4 credits The art of writing editorials, columns and blog posts – and getting them published. This course focuses not on what to think but on how to form an opinion and write an essay, column or blog posting that will get past an editor and into print. Emphasis is laid on the role of reporting and on the competitive nature of journalism. Each class is broken into two parts. The first half is a discussion of famous examples of opinion writing. These include “Is There a Santa Claus?”, which was issued in the September 21, 1897, edition of the New York Sun and is the most widely reprinted piece in all of journalism; “A Job for the Summit,” the Wall Street Journal editorial that in June 1979 moved the seven leaders of the industrial world to scrap their agenda for the Tokyo Summit and focus on the plight of the Indochina refugees; “Twilight of the Kings,” the Chicago Tribune’s editorial on the outbreak of World War I; and Jimmy Breslin’s famous column on the assassination of President Kennedy. The second half is conducted as an editorial board meeting in which students pitch essays and an editor reasons them out. This is the time in which students are taught the craft of pre-meditating a strategy for getting a piece past an editor and into print – the role of original reporting, the tactic of writing about an event before it happens, and the value of rhetoric and style. Assignments are made. Finished pieces are shared and discussed with the class. Class size: 15

 

15846

THTR  110  B

INTRO TO ACTING:  The Actor & the Moment

Jean Wagner

. . W . F

10:10am-11:30 am

FISHER PAC

PART

In this class we examine how an actor brings truth to the smallest unit of performance. The richness of the moment is created by the imaginative, physical, psychological, intellectual and emotional qualities that the actor brings to it. We explore ways to gain access to richly layered authenticity through games, improvisations, individual creations and exercises in given circumstance.  Students are given tools to transcend accepted logic, embrace risk-taking, and live fully in the present.  Class size: 16

 

15850

BIO  129

 THE Biology OF PLANTS

Sasha Wright

                     LAB:

M . W . .

M . . . .

10:10am- 11:30am

1:30pm-4:30pm

RKC 102

RKC 114

SCI

This course, intended for students NOT intending to major in Biology, provides an introduction to the essential biology of plants, including the use of plants in human society. We will conduct laboratory investigations to familiarize ourselves with plant form and function, with special emphasis on campus plants.  Class size: 18

 

15849

MATH  107

 TOPICS IN GEOMETRICAL MATHEMATICS

Ethan Bloch

. T . Th .

1:30pm-2:50pm

HEG 308

MATC

Geometrical mathematics involves many topics other than traditional Euclidean geometry. This course explores topics that vary from semester to semester and may include some, but not all of the following: symmetry, groups, frieze and wallpaper patterns, graphs, surfaces, knots, and higher dimensions. Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic. Class size: 22.

 

15615

EUS  102

 INTRO TO ENVIRONMENTAL & URBAN SCIENCE

Elias Dueker

. T . Th .

1:30pm-2:50pm

RKC 102

SSCI

This course offers an integrated exploration of the science underlying environmental issues. The primary objective is to provide  students with a systems-oriented understanding of  biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes that  affect earth, air, water, and life. Students will gain a solid understanding of the fundamental scientific principles governing environmental systems including the cycling of matter and the flow of energy. By practicing the application of these scientific concepts, students will develop their ability to predict potential outcomes of complex environmental issues. Regional examples of elemental cycling, hydrology, ecology, climate change, and food systems will be used to teach and practice concepts, including through field trips to local environmental points of interest.  Class size: 22

 

15716

EUS  203  B

 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Ben Houston

. . . . F

9:30am-11:30 am

HDR 101A

SCI

2 credits   (Core Course) This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with a comprehensive review of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and remote sensing technologies as they are used in a variety of social and environmental science applications. Through a mixture of lectures, readings and hands-on exercises, students will acquire an understanding of the structure of spatial data and databases, basic cartographic principles and data visualization techniques, how to conduct spatial analysis and methods for developing sound GIS project design and management practices. Upon completing this class, students will:

·              Understand the fundamental concepts of geographic information systems and their relationship with other information management systems.

·              Gain familiarity with GIS software for conducting basic GIS analyses and producing cartographic products.

·              Conduct studies typically carried out in GIS including site selection, analysis of spatial/temporal processes, assess environmental impacts, geocode data and conduct point pattern analysis.

Prerequisites:  Preference will be given to moderated students. Class size: 10

 

 

Other courses added late:

 

15616

SPAN  110   

 ACCELERATED SPANISH I

Hilda Puig

M T W Th .

8:50am-9:50am

OLINLC 120

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   A first-year course designed for the student who has had some prior exposure to Spanish or who has excellent command of another Romance language. All the major topics in grammar will be covered, and the course will provide intensive practice in the four skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing). The course will provide a streamlined review of basic topics in grammar and provide more detail and exercises for advanced topics. The textbook will be supplemented with authentic video material from Spain and 'Latin America. One additional hour per week of practice with the Spanish tutor and a substantial amount of work in the language resource center will also be required. The course will prepare the student for summer language programs abroad or Spanish 201 the following semester. Prospective students should contact Professor Nicholson at nicholso@bard.edu. Class size: 18

 

15844

PHIL  302 B   

 Philosophy Research Seminar

Daniel Berthold

M . . . .

1:30pm-3:50pm

OLIN 306

HUM

An intensive advanced seminar required of all philosophy majors in their junior year. A problem in contemporary philosophy is carefully selected, exactingly defined, and thoroughly researched; an essay or article is written addressing the problem, going through numerous revisions as a result of class responses, faculty guidance, and further research; the article is formally presented to the seminar, followed by discussion and debate; and the article in its completed form is submitted to an undergraduate or professional journal of philosophy or to an undergraduate conference in philosophy. The seminar integrates the teaching and practice of writing into the study of the subject matter of the seminar. Emphasis will be placed on the art of research; the development, composition, organization, and revision of analytical prose; the use of evidence to support an argument; strategies of interpretation and analysis of texts; and the mechanics and art of style and documentation. This course is required of all junior Philosophy majors.  Class size: 15

 

15620

PS  273  

 Diplomacy & Development

James Ketterer

M . W . .

11:50am- 1:10pm

RKC 111

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies (core course), Human Rights  The course explores the history, complexity and changing nature of diplomacy and international development.  Students will gain an understanding of the basic goals, constraints and structures of diplomacy: diplomatic corps, embassies, consulates, aid missions, attaches, envoys and the use of non-traditional diplomats.  They will then examine the evolution of those components and contexts to include public diplomacy, cyber diplomacy, diplomacy in combat zones and the use of international development as a foreign policy tool.  Using selected diplomatic crises as case studies, students will analyze the roles played by different government agencies, militaries, international & regional organizations, the media, public interest groups, private foundations, contractors, commercial interests, educational institutions, and law enforcement officials. Students will explore how nations communicate with each other in the 21st century (formally and informally) and will use in-class simulations and videoconferences with students across the Bard international network to explore the roles played by different actors in addressing immediate crises and longer-term diplomatic issues.  This course will enhance students’ understanding of international relations, foreign policy formulation and implementation, and diplomatic history.  Class size: 22

 

 

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SCHEDULE CHANGES:

 

15583

FSEM II

 first year seminar ii

Leon Botstein

Jennifer Hudson

. T . Th .

1:30pm – 2:50pm

OLIN 201

 

 

15194

BLC  107   

 Intensive ESL

Denise Minin

M . W . .

. T . Th .

10:00am- 12:30pm

10:00am-12:30pm

HEG 200

HDR101A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15301

ARTH  287   

 Experiments in Art & Technology

Alex Kitnick

. T . Th .

11:50am-1:10pm

AVERY 117

AART

 

15339

DAN  316   NYLA

 Dance Repertory

Leah Cox /

Beth Gill

. . . Th .

. . . . F

6:15pm-9:15pm

12:00pm-3:30pm

FISHER PAC THORNE

PART

 

15269

MUS  WKSHB   

 Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . W . .

4:00pm-6:20pm

BLM HALL

PART

 

15467

CNSV  309   

 Aural Skills IV

Benjamin Laude

. T . Th .

1:30pm-2:50pm

OLIN 104

 

 

15022

ARAB 202   Intermediate Arabic

Elizabeth Holt

M . W . F

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLINLC 206

FLLC

15039

FREN  270   

 Advanced Composition & Conversation

Matthew Amos

. T . Th .

1:30pm-2:50pm

RKC 200

FLLC

 

15121

CMSC  145   

 Discrete Math

Joseph Kirtland

. T . Th .

4:40pm-6:00pm

RKC 103

MATC

 

15095

BIO  303   

 Microbiology

Brooke Jude

                      LAB:

. . . Th .

. T . . .

3:10pm-5:10pm

1:00pm-5:00pm

RKC 111

RKC 112

SCI

 

15097

BIO  324   

 Animal Physiology

Arseny Khakhalin

                      LAB:

M . W . .

. . . . F

11:50am-1:10pm

8:30 am- 12:30pm

RKC 101

RKC 112

SCI

 

15105

CHEM  142   LBA

 Basic Prin of Chemistry II

. TBA

M . . . .

1:30pm-3:45pm

RKC 126

SCI

 

15106

CHEM  142   LBB

 Basic Prin of Chemistry II

. TBA

. . W . .

4:40pm-6:55pm

RKC 126

SCI

 

15111

CHEM  202   LBA

 Organic Chemistry II

. TBA

. . . . F

1:30pm-4:30pm

RKC 122/124

SCI

 

15422

HIST  141   

 A HAUNTED UNION:

TWENTIETH-CENTURY GERMANY AND THE

UNIFICATIONS OF EUROPE

Gregory Moynahan

. T . Th .

1:30pm- 2:50pm

OLINLC 206

HIST

 

15356

HIST  3151   

 “WE MAKE OUR OWN HISTORY”: *

A Practicum on Eleanor Roosevelt

Cynthia Koch

. . . . F

1:30pm-5:30pm

OLIN 309

HIST

 

15441

REL  106   

 Introduction to Islam

Tehseen Thaver

M . W . .

11:50am-1:10pm

OLIN 201

HUM/DIFF

 

15584

EUS  203  

 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Ben Houston

. . . . F

2:40pm-4:40pm

HDR 101A

SCI

 

15392

HR  331   

SPACES OF RESILIENCE: Social Justice in Urban Territories

Jeanne van Heeswijk

M . . . .

2:00pm-4:20pm

OLINLC 115

AART

 

15393

HR  344   

 Urban Curating: MODES OF ACUPUNCTURE

Jeanne van Heeswijk

. T . . .

10:10am- 12:30pm

 

CCS

AART

 

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PROFESSOR CHANGES:

 

15469

CNSV  330   

 Composition for performers

Joan Tower

. T . . .

10:00am-12:30pm

BLUM HALL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15003

ITAL  106   

 Intensive Italian

TBA

M T W Th .

11:15am-1:15pm

OLINLC 118

FLLC

 

15043

ITAL  222   

 TBA

TBA

M . W . .

1:30pm-2:50pm

OLINLC 120

FLLC

 

15377

REL  240   

 Intolerance: Political Animals

and their prey

Bruce Chilton

. . W . F

1:30pm-2:50pm

OLIN 101

HUM

 

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DESCRIPTION AMENDMENTS:

 

15486

PHOT  104   

 Introduction to  Photography for Non-majors

Tanya Marcuse

. T . . .

10:10 am-1:10 pm

WDS

PART

An introduction to both the techniques and aesthetics of black and white photography as a means of self-expression. Systematic instruction in darkroom techniques along with weekly criticism of individual work will provide the student with a solid basic understanding of the use of the camera as an expressive tool. The student must obtain within the first week of class: 1) a camera (35mm or 21/4”) with fully adjustable f/stops and shutter speeds,  2) a hand-held reflected light exposure meter. No previous darkroom experience is required. This class is open only to Upper College students who have successfully moderated in disciplines other than Photography.

 

15311

THTR  208   

 Intermediate Playwriting

Chiori Miyagawa

. . . Th .

1:30pm-4:30pm

FISHER CONFERENCE

PART

Cross-listed:  Written Arts (Cross-listing added)

 

15026

LIT  204   

 CompARATIVE  LitERATURE: Ancient  QUARRELS, Literature AND CRITIQUE IN CLASSICAL ANTIQUITY

Thomas Bartscherer

M . W . .

1:30pm-2:50pm

OLIN 203

ELIT

Cross-listed: Classical Studies  In a celebrated passage from Plato’s Republic, Socrates claims that there is “an ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry.” In this course, we will consider this and other ways in which ancient authors (or their characters) configured the relationship between poetic production and theoretical inquiry, and therewith gave birth to the practice of literary criticism in the West. We will begin with Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, focusing particularly on the understanding of poetry manifest within the world of these poems. Readings from Greek literature will also include lyric poetry (focusing on Sappho and Pindar), and Attic drama (e.g., Aristophane’s Frogs and Clouds, Aeschylus’ Prometheus Bound, Euripides’ Medea and Bacchae). Readings from the Latin corpus will include epic, lyric, and dramatic poetry (e.g. Vergil, Horace, Catullus, Seneca). Concurrently, we will be examining the ongoing critique of literature from the fragments of early Greek philosophers (e.g. Anaxagoras, Xenophanes, Heraclitus), through Plato and Aristotle, to Cicero and Horace. Our twofold aim will be to develop an understanding of all these texts in their original context and to consider how they set the stage for subsequent developments in western literature and criticism. All readings in English.

 

15079

LIT  252   

 English Literature III

Deirdre d'Albertis

. T . Th .

11:50am-1:10pm

OLIN 201

ELIT

Cross-listed: Victorian Studies  This course explores developments in British literature from the late eighteenth century to the twentieth century—a period marked by the effects of the French and American Revolutions, rapid industrialization, the rise and decline of empire, two world wars, the development of regional identities within Britain, and growing uncertainty about the meaning of "Britishness" in a global context. Beginning with the "Romantics" and ending with “modernist”  poetry of the 20th century, we will discuss such issues as the construction of tradition, the imagining of Britain, conservatism versus radicalism, the empire, and the usefulness (or not) of periodization. The centerpiece of the course is close reading—of poetry, prose, essays, and plays. There will also be a strong emphasis on the historical and social contexts of the works we are reading, and on the specific ways in which historical forces and social changes shape and are at times shaped by the formal features of literary texts.

 

15092

BIO  202   

 Ecology and Evolution

Felicia Keesing

. . W . F

8:30am- 11:30am

RKC 114/115

SCI

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies   This core course for biology majors is an introduction to the general principles of ecology and evolution that, with genetics, form the core of biological understanding. In addition to studying foundational ideas in both ecology and evolution, we will explore modern topics at the boundary between these two areas. We will consider, for example, how genetic variation among individual organisms can influence ecological interactions, and how these interactions can influence fitness. We will focus on a mechanistic understanding of processes, using model-building to inform that understanding.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology 201, Genetics and Evolution.  Class size: 18

 

15436

PHIL  271   

 Topics: Philosophy of Language

Robert Martin

. . W . F

10:10am- 11:30am

BITO 210

HUM

Cross-listed:  Mind, Brain & Behavior  We will study Saul Kripke’s ground-breaking lectures Naming and Necessity, given at Princeton University in 1970. For background we will read essays of Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, John Searle and others.  If time permits, we will read some of the recent literature on Naming and Necessity.  Prerequisites:  one prior course in philosophy (preferably Symbolic Logic) and permission of the instructor. Class size: 18

 

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CORRECTION TO DISTRIBUTION:

 

15347

ANTH  212   

 Historical Archaeology

Christopher Lindner

. . W . .

. . . . F

4:40pm-6:00pm

11:50am-4:30pm

HEG 300

ROSE 108

HIST/DIFF

 

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CANCELLED COURSES:

 

All Flamenco classes are cancelled.

 

15317

THTR  145

INTRO TO THEATER & PERFORMANCE

Jean Wagner

 

 

 

 

 

15044

ITAL  202   

 Intermediate Italian II

Joseph Luzzi

 

 

 

 

 

15850

BIO  335   

 EXPERIMENTAL PLANT BIOLOGY

Sasha Wright

                   

 

 

 

 

 

15136

MATH  213   A

 Linear Algebra w/ODEs

Ethan Bloch

 

 

 

 

 

15013

HIST  3121   

 The Case for Liberties

Alice Stroup

 

 

 

 

 

15374

PS  331  

 Diplomacy & Development

James Ketterer

 

 

 

 

 

15435

FSEM II DB

 FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR ii

Daniel Berthold