11938

HR 215   History of Human Rights

Peter Rosenblum

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50pm

OLIN 306

HIST

(Human Rights core course)  International human rights is both young and old.  The core ideas stretch back at least as far as the Enlightenment, but the founders of the modern movement are just reaching retirement.   And while it is increasingly well established in international law, politics and the activities of nongovernmental organizations, there is still considerable debate over what human rights is and what it is intended to achieve: Is it a movement, an ideology or a set of laws? And is its purpose to pressure repressive countries, to provide a constitution for the world, or, more nefariously, to facilitate economic globalization?  In the last decade, through books ranging from autobiographies to angry polemics, the debate has emerged in competing views about what constitutes the history of human rights. While telling the story of human rights, these histories also expose the tension and controversy that underlie the movement, itself.  Readings will include founding figures of the modern movement like Louis Henkin and AryehNeier,, distinguished journalists like Adam Hochschild and historians Lynn Hunt, Samuel Moyn, Carol Anderson, Elizabeth Borgwardt, Ken Cmiel and more.  Class size: 15

 

11797

LIT 218   Free Speech

Thomas Keenan

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30pm

HEG 102

HUM

Cross-listed:  Human Rights (core course)  An introduction to debates about freedom of expression. The course will examine the ways in which rights, language, privacy and publicity have been linked together in ideas about democracy. What is 'freedom of speech'? Is there a right to say anything? Why? We will investigate who has had this right, where it has come from, and what it has had to do in particular with literature. What powers does speech have, who has the power to speak, and for what?  Debates about censorship, hate speech, the Firstamendment and Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights will be obvious starting points, but we will also explore some less obvious questions: about faith and the secular, confession and torture, surveillance, the emergence of political agency. In asking about the status of the speaking human subject, we will look at the ways in which the subject of rights, and indeed the thought of human rights itself, derives from a 'literary' experience. These questions will be examined, if not answered, across a variety of literary, philosophical, legal and political texts, with a heavy dose of case studies (many of them happening right now) and readings in contemporary critical and legal theory.  Class size: 22

 

12178

HR 221   Queer Subjects of Desire

Robert Weston

. T . Th .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

OLIN 203

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Gender & Sexuality Studies  Over the past two decades, preliminary discourse-shaping debates between proponents of Gay & Lesbian Studies and proponents of Queer Theory have proliferated into a rich array of subfields in the research on gender and sexuality. This course will engage students in some of the core issues that have shaped the widening field of sexuality studies. The course will be organized into a series of units, each devoted to a particular approach to the study of sexuality and gender: units vary, but may include: The Subject of Desire; Psychoanalysis; Gender Theory; Feminism; Desiring Capitalism; The History of (Homo)Sexuality ; Homosexuality & the Law; Ethnosexualities; Sexuality & Race; Transgender. Class size: 22

 

11796

HR 235   Dignity & the Human Rights Tradition

Roger Berkowitz

M . . Th .

4:40 – 6:00pm

OLIN 202

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed: Political Studies  (Human Rights core course)  We live at a time when the claim to human rights is both taken for granted and regularly disregarded. One reason for the disconnect between the reality and the ideal of human rights is that human rights have never been given a secure philosophical foundation. Indeed, many have argued that absent a religiously grounded faith in human dignity, there is no legal ground for human rights. Might it be that human rights are simply well-meaning aspirations without legal or philosophical foundation? And what is dignity anyway? Ought we to abandon talk about dignity and admit that human rights are groundless? Against this view, human rights advocates, international lawyers, and constitutional judges continue to speak of dignity as the core value of the international legal system. Indeed, lawyers in Germany and South Africa are developing a "dignity jurisprudence" that might guarantee human rights on the foundation of human dignity. Is it possible, therefore, to develop a secular and legally meaningful idea of dignity that can offer a ground for human rights? This class explores both the modern challenge to dignity and human rights as well as attempts to resuscitate a new and more coherent secular ideal of dignity as a legally valid guarantee of human rights. In addition to texts including Hannah Arendt's book, The Origins of Totalitarianism, we read legal cases, and documents from international law.  Class size: 22

 

11940

HR 303   Research in Human Rights

Peter Rosenblum

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30am

HEG 300

HUM

What is it to do research, academic or otherwise, in the field of human rights? What are the relevant methods, and tools? How do the political and ethical considerations central to the discourse of human rights enter into the actual conduct of research? The seminar, required for junior Human Rights majors, will explore a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the field, reading a variety of examples across an interdisciplinary landscape. Readings include texts in continental philosophy, political and social theory, literary and cultural studies, international law, media and visual culture, gender and identity research, documentary and testimony, quantitative analysis including GIS and statistical data, oral and archival history,among others, and many case studies in actual human rights reporting.  The seminar is required for Juniors in Human Rights, and is also open to others if there is space. 

Class size: 15

 

11939

HR 323   Race and the Pastoral

Ann Seaton

. . W . .

4:30 -6:50pm

RKC 200

ELIT

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities  We will begin by exploring what is meant by the literary and cultural category of the 'pastoral.' Is it a mode, a genre, an affect, or something else?  The same critical investigation applies to the category of 'race.' The seminar will consider what 'race' and 'the pastoral' might have to do with one another.  The first half of the class traces the pastoral from Ancient Greece to the Renaissance.  These canonically pastoral bodies, landscapes, and (often same-sex) desires are our pastoral “primal scenes,” to be returned to, reshaped, and internalized.  Soon, though, the pastoral emerges in relation to more explicit difference--in early modern travel narratives, Montaigne, and the utopian-pastoral of Bacon's "New Atlantis."  In the second part of the class, we consider theamerican pastoral (Emerson, Thoreau, Hudson River School paintings), and19th century landscape theories about gardens and liberal arts colleges.  Students will also research local histories and issues related to the Hudson Valley landscape.  Readings include texts by Theocritus, Moschus, Bion, Longus, Milton, Shakespeare, Montaigne, Hakluyt, Mandeville, Francis Bacon, Kant, Burke, Hegel, Emerson, Thoreau, Heidegger, Derrida, Benjamin, Sontag, Edith Wharton, Frederick Olmsted, Adrian Piper, and Mike Davis.  Students will also read Simon Schama's Landscape and Memory, Nancy Duncan's Landscapes of Privilege:  The Aesthetics of anamerican Surburb, and Cheryl Miller’s “Whiteness as Property.” The course will culminate in an experimental mini-conference on "Race and the Pastoral" this spring that may include text, video, and performance.   Interested students should email aseaton@bard.edu.   Class size: 15

 

12179

HR 345   Aesthetics of the Common

Jeannine Tang

. . W .  .

10:30 – 1:00 pm

CCS Sun Room

HUM

In the wake of protracted global financial and ecological crises, we have seen renewed attention to the idiom of the commons. Theorists, artists and activists have reinvested in modalities of the commons, to refute the enclosure of social relations under late capitalism, and reimagine the ownership, sharing and dispersal of resources. Recent cultural theory has also expanded the category of aesthetics, by parsing its distribution of sense and extension of affect into sites of biopolitical order, to examine how aesthetics might prefigure potential institutions, norms and practices of communization. The commons, for many thinkers, are a site of contradiction: both a threshold through which one might overcome capital accumulation, while nonetheless saturated by the virtual experience of biopolitical disciplining. We will work through the ways in which aesthetic inquiry mediates the emergence of the commons, and how sense and culture might themselves constitute areas of communization. This course is cross-listed with CCS.  Interested students should contact Professor Tang, (jtang@bard.edu) prior to registration.

 

11634

ANTH 206   Human Variation: The Anthropology of Race, Scientific Racism,  and other Biological Reductionisms

Mario Bick

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30am

OLIN 301

SSCI/DIFF

 

11636

ANTH 253   Anthropological Controversies

John Ryle

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30pm

OLIN 203

SSCI

 

11633

ANTH 265   Race & Nature in Africa

Yuka Suzuki

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10pm

OLIN 202

SSCI/DIFF

 

11629

ANTH 335   Local Realities and Global Ideologies in the Sudans

John Ryle

. T . . .

4:40 -7:00pm

HEG 308

SSCI/DIFF

 

11628

ANTH 349   Political Ecology

Yuka Suzuki

. . W . .

10:10 - 12:30pm

OLIN 107

SSCI/DIFF

 

11871

ART 206 ED  Sculpture II:

Presence and Absence

Ellen Driscoll

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30pm

FISHER 138

PART

 

11734

ARTH 209   Art & Nation Building

Julia Rosenbaum

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50pm

OLIN 102

AART

 

11733

ARTH 244   Contemporary African Art

Teju Cole

M . W . .

1:30 – 2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AART/DIFF

 

11977

ECON 221   Economic Development

Sanjaya DeSilva

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30pm

OLIN 205

SSCI

 

11656

EUS 202   African Oil: New Scramble or

New Hope?

Robert Tynes

. T . Th .

3:10 – 4:30pm

OLIN LC 115

SSCI

 

11901

FILM 241   Cinema under Communism

Ian Buruma

           Screening:

M . . . .

S . . . . .

1:30 -4:30pm

5:00 -7:00pm

AVERY 338

PRESTON 110

AART

 

11900

FILM 245   Documentary and Social Media Workshop

Pacho Velez

. . W . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

AVERY 217

 

 

11661

HIST 102   Europe since 1815

Gennady Shkliarevsky

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50pm

OLIN 301

HIST

 

11723

HIST / LAIS 120   Modern Latinamerica

Since Independence

Miles Rodriguez

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30am

OLIN 310

HIST

 

11902

HIST 137   Global Europe

Gregory Moynahan

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50pm

OLIN 201

HIST

 

11884

HIST 158   Apartheid in South(ern) Africa

Drew Thompson

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30am

OLIN 205

HIST

 

11978

HIST 185   The Making of the Modern

Middle East

Omar Cheta

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10pm

HEG 204

HIST

 

11724

HIST 2122   The Arab-Israel Conflict

Joel Perlmann

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30pm

OLIN 301

HIST/DIFF

 

12041

HIST 229   Confucianism: Humanity, Rites, and Rights

Robert Culp

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30am

OLIN 205

HUM/DIFF

 

11892

HIST/ LAIS  3225   Global Latinamerican Conjunctures

Miles Rodriguez

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50pm

HEG 200

HIST

 

11561

LIT 2203   Balkan Voices: Writing

from  Southeastern Europe

Elizabeth Frank

. . W . .

. . . Th .

3:10 -4:30pm

1:30 -2:50pm

OLINLC 118

ASP 302

ELIT

 

11595

LIT 2208   Literary and Cinematic Reflections of War in the Modern Middle East

Amir Moosavi

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10pm

OLINLC 210

ELIT

 

11602

LIT 3023   Poetry and Society

Joan Retallack

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50pm

OLINLC 208

ELIT

 

11807

LIT 3206   Evidence

Thomas Keenan

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

CCS

HUM

 

11865

LIT 358   Exile & Estrangement Fiction

Norman Manea

M . . . .

3:10 -5:30pm

OLIN 107

ELIT

 

11682

MUS / ANTH  253   Special Topics in Ethnomusicology: Popular Music and Politics in Africa

Andrew Eisenberg

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

BLM N210

AART

 

11789

PHIL 216   Political Theory

Jay Elliott

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

RKC 115

HUM

 

11792

PHIL 255   Medical Ethics

Daniel Berthold

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30am

ASP 302

HUM

 

11790

PHIL 266   Philosophy of  / at War

Ruth Zisman

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10pm

ASP 302

HUM

 

11903

PS 104   International Relations

Christopher McIntosh

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50pm

HEG 106

SSCI

 

11905

PS 109   Political Economy

Sanjib Baruah

M . W . .

8:30 -9:50am

OLIN 204

SSCI

 

11909

PS 222   Democracy in Latinamerica

Omar Encarnacion

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30pm

OLIN 307

SSCI

 

11910

PS 234   Occupy Political Theory

David Kettler

. T . . .

3:10 -5:30 pm

OLIN 302

SSCI

 

12322

PS 239   The United Nations and Model U.N.

Jonathan Becker /

James Ketterer

. . . . F

1:30pm – 2:50 pm

OLIN 202

SSCI

 

11912

PS 254   Security & International Politics

Michelle Murray

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30am

OLIN 202

SSCI

 

11915

PS 314   Political Economy of Development

Sanjib Baruah

. T . . .

10:10 - 12:30pm

HEG 201

SSCI

 

11916

PS 377   Grand Strategy From Sun Tzu

to Clausewitz

Walter Mead

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50pm

HEG 201

SSCI/DIFF

 

11854

PSY 337   The Psychology of Prejudice

and Stereotyping

Kristin Lane

. . W . .

10:10 – 12:30 pm

HEG 201

SSCI/DIFF

 

11925

REL 246   Gender and Sexuality in Muslim Societies

Irfana Hashmi

. . W . F

10:10 - 11:30am

OLINLC 210

HUM/DIFF

 

11933

REL 332   Gandhi: Life, Philosophy, 

and the Strategies of Non-Violence

Richard Davis

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50pm

RKC 115

HUM

 

11935

SOC 120   Inequality inamerica

Yuval Elmelech

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30am

OLIN 203

SSCI/DIFF

 

11625

SOC 213   Sociological Theory

Sarah Egan

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30am

OLIN 203

SSCI

 

11626

SOC 232   Political Sociology

Sarah Egan

M . W . .

1:30 – 2:50pm

OLIN 201

SSCI

 

11622

SOC 332   Seminar on Social Problems

Yuval Elmelech

. . . . F

10:10 - 12:30pm

OLIN 205

SSCI/DIFF