11612

GER 202   Intermediate German II

Thomas Wild

M T . Th .

10:30 - 11:30 am

OLINLC 208

FLLC

For students who have completed three semesters of college German (or equivalent). The course is designed to deepen the proficiency gained in the courses up to GER 201 by increasing students’ fluency in speaking, reading, and writing, and adding significantly to their working vocabulary. Students improve their ability to express their own ideas and hone their strategies for understanding spoken and written communication. Selected 20th-century literary texts and audiovisual materials, including a contemporary award-winning novel by Barbara Honigmann. Class size: 18

 

11527

GER 206   German Immersion

Franz Kempf

M T W Th F

9:00 - 10:00 am 11:00 - 12:00 pm

2:00 -3:00 pm

OLINLC 118

OLINLC 118

OLINLC 118

FLLC

12 credits. Intensive study of a foreign language helps to create a highly effective and exciting learning environment for those who wish to achieve a high degree of proficiency in the shortest possible time. German immersion is designed to enable students with little or no previous experience in German to complete two years of college German within five months (spring semester at Bard, plus August in Germany for 4 additional credits). To achieve this goal, students take fifteen class hours per week during the semester at Bard, and twenty hours per week during August at Bard College Berlin, Bard’s sister institution in Berlin. Each participant will be able to enroll concurrently in one other course at Bard. This will allow the student to pursue a more balanced study program or to fulfill certain requirements (e.g., First-Year Seminar). Beginning with elementary pronunciation, students are plunged into daily intensive usage of German, with practice in all four language skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing). The communicative approach actively involves the student in a variety of activities including structured practice, role playing, linguistic games, student-to- student give-and-take, teacher-to-student give-and-take (and vice versa), response to listening-comprehension exercises, and invention of creative oral and/or written exchanges. Emphasis will be placed on linguistic accuracy and cultural authenticity. As the course progresses, the transition is made from learning the language for everyday communication to the consideration of literary and cultural values through the reading of classical and modern texts (e.g., Goethe, Eichendorff, Kafka, Brecht) which are representative for the thought and forms of the age in which they were written.  The last month of the program will be spent in Germany. Participants will study at Bard College Berlin for four weeks.  Course days are Monday through Friday, leaving students most afternoons, evenings and weekends free for independent study, research, leisure, and excursions and enabling them to take full advantage of Berlin’s vibrant cultural life. To cover the costs of the program, financial aid will be made available. Class size: 18

 

11613

GER 422   Contemporary German Literature

& Film after 1989

Thomas Wild

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLINLC 118

FLLC

What is at stake for contemporary German writers, filmmakers, and intellectuals? What topics do they address in their movies and documentaries, which problems do they discuss in their novels, poems, and plays? How do these artworks reflect Germany's multi-ethnic society and its pivotal role in a rapidly changing Europe? During the Cold War, the country had been divided between East and West for forty years – how present is this past in contemporary Germany, twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989? Has ‘1989’ changed the modes of writing? The basis for our discussion of these questions will be texts by major contemporary writers such as German Nobel Prize winner Herta Müller, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, W.G. Sebald, Ingo Schulze, Terézia Mora, Irina Liebmann, Emine Sevgy Özdamar, Tankred Dorst, or Uwe Kolbe. We will examine distinguished feature films, such as Fatih Akin's Head On, Hans-Christian Schmid’s Lichter, and Michael Haneke’s The White Ribbon, as well as outstanding documentaries, among them The Wall, and Der Kick. Our analysis of literary texts and films will be complemented by close readings of theoretical writings by the respective artists as well as contemporary criticism.  Taught in German.  Class size: 15