11474

FILM 109   Aesthetics of Film

Richard Suchenski

Screenings begin @ 7:00

. T . Th .

. . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

7:00 pm -

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Open to first-year students only.  Designed for first-year students, this course will offer a broad, historically-grounded survey of film aesthetics internationally. Key elements of film form will be addressed through close analysis of important films by directors such as Griffith, Eisenstein, Dreyer, Hitchcock, von Sternberg, Rossellini, Powell, Bresson, Brakhage, Godard, Tarkovsky, and Denis, the reading of important critical or theoretical texts, and discussions of central issues in the other arts.  Midterm exam, two short papers, and final exam.   Class size: 25

 

11470

FILM 114   History of Cinema: Sound

John Pruitt

            Screening:

. T . . .

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

7:00 -9:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Open to First-year students only. The one-year sequence, conducted as a lecture course, is designed to give the student a broad introduction to the history and aesthetics of film from a roughly chronological perspective. There are weekly screenings of major films widely acknowledged as central to the evolution of the medium as well as supplementary reading assignments which provide both a narrative history and a strong encounter with the leading critical and theoretical issues of cinema, often within a context of 20th century art and literature. While the student can take either half of the sequence, the program recommends that both parts of the course are taken, especially for any student contemplating film as a concentration. Mid-term and final exams; term paper. The second half of the sequence begins with crucial films in the transition to the technology and aesthetic of the sound film on an international scale, those by Lang, Sternberg, Bunuel, Vertov and Vigo. There follows a study of the evolution of the long-take, deep-focus aesthetic in the films of Renoir, Welles and Mizoguchi; of Hollywood genres in the films of Ford, Hitchcock, Hawks and Sturges; the rise of neo-realism in Rossellini, DeSica and Visconti; the contribution of the American avant-garde in Deren, Peterson, Brakhage, Anger, Smith, Conner and Breer; the French New Wave in Godard, Truffaut and Rohmer; the northern tradition in Dreyer and Bergman; selections of Asian filmic practice in films of Ray, Kurosawa, and Ozu; and finally, further European innovations in Antonioni, Varda, the Taviani Bros., Pasolini, et al. Readings by Bazin, Brakhage, Deren, Bresson, Sontag, et al.   

Class size: 30

 

11896

FILM 167   Survey of Electronic Art

Ed Halter

            Screening

. . . . F

. . . Th .

10:10 -1:10 pm

7:00 -9:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society;  Open to First-year students only. An introductory lecture course on the history of moving-image art made with electronic media, from the earliest computer-generated films, through television, the portable video camera, the internet, and gaming. Topics include analog versus digital, guerrilla television, expanded cinema, feminist media, video and performance, internet art, video installation, and the question of video games as art. Requirements include two short essays and a final in-class exam or final research paper.  Class size: 25

 

11461

FILM 203   Electronic Media:

Performance & Video

Ben Coonley

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 117 / 333

PART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities, Theater  This course explores intersections of video and performance art. Course participants develop ways of using video's most fundamental property: its ability to reproduce a stream of real-time synchronized images and sounds. How does video technology mediate between on-screen performer and audience? How can artists interested in creating critical and self-reflexive media respond to video’s immediacy and “liveness”? How can performance artists use video playback devices, displays, projectors, and interactive elements to shape and enhance live art? Course participants will work on individual projects using cameras, monitors, switchers, surveillance systems, projectors, and software-based video mixers. The first half of the course concentrates on the creation of performance “tapes” (or tape-less video documents) and the history of experimental video focused on framing staged live activities. The second half of the course concentrates on the use of video as a central component within live art events, plus a continued discussion about the larger cultural and psychological impact of live video production. Readings on and viewings of work by Nam Jun Paik, Andy Warhol, Joan Jonas, Martha Rosler, Laurie Anderson, Richard Serra, Chris Burden, John Baldessari, Bruce Nauman, Gilbert & George, George Kuchar, William Wegman, Michael Smith, Walid Raad, Wynne Greenwood, Shana Moulton, Eileen Maxson, Ryan Trecartin, Xander Marro, Miranda July, Sadie Benning, Jeremy Bailey, Paper Rad, Harry Dodge and Stanya Kahn. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

11893

FILM 203   Electronic Media:

Digital Animation

Jacqueline Goss

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 217 / 333

PART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities  In this course we will make video and web-based projects using digital animation and compositing programs (Macromedia Flash and Adobe After Effects).  The course is designed to help students develop a facility with these tools and to find personal animating styles that surpass the tools at hand. We will work to reveal techniques and aesthetics associated with digital animation that challenge conventions of storytelling, editing, figure/ground relationship, and portrayal of the human form.  To this end, we will refer to diverse examples of animating and collage from film, music, writing, photography, and painting.  Prerequisite: familiarity with a nonlinear video-editing program. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

11465

FILM 207   Introduction to Video Production

Jacqueline Goss

. T . . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

AVERY 217 / 333

PART

This course is designed to introduce you to various elements of video production with an emphasis on video art and experimentation.  The class culminates with the completion of a single channel video piece by each student.  To facilitate this final project, there will be a number of camera and editing assignments that are designed to familiarize you with digital video technology while investigating various aesthetic and theoretical concepts. Class sessions will consist of technology demonstrations, screenings, critiques and discussions. Technology training will include: cameras, Final Cut Pro, studio lighting and lighting for green screen, key effects, microphones and more. No prerequisites, permission from instructor. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

11460

FILM 208   16mm Film Workshop

Peter Hutton

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PART

An introduction to filmmaking with a strong emphasis on mastering the 16mm Bolex camera. Students will be required to shoot six different assignments designed to address basic experimental, documentary, and narrative techniques. A wide range of technical and aesthetic issues will be explored in conjunction with editing, lighting, and sound recording techniques. No prerequisites, permission from instructor.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

11894

FILM 219   Film & Modernism

John Pruitt

            Screening:

M . . . .

S . . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

7:00 -9:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Operating on the assumption that the study of film, a syncretic art par excellence, offers a particularly advantageous perspective on understanding the aesthetic underpinnings of 20th Century art, the course explores the relationship between a certain mode of cinematic achievement, for the most part labeled avant-garde, and the major tenets of modernist art, both visual and literary. Many of the films studied are by artists who worked in other media (such as Léger, Strand, Cornell, and Duchamp) or whose work manifests a direct relationship to various artistic movements such as surrealism, futurism, and constructivism. An attempt is made to relate certain films to parallel achievements in photography, poetry, and music, with some attention paid to relatively little-seen filmmakers such as Lye, Kinugasa, and Jennings. Much of the assigned reading is not film criticism as such, but crucial critical works that help to define modernism in general, including those by Baudelaire, Pound, Ortega y Gasset, Moholy-Nagy, and Brecht. Other films studied are by (Europeans) Vertov, Eisenstein, Buñuel, Dulac, Ruttmann, Man Ray; and (American) Deren, Brakhage, Anger, Snow, Gehr, Conner, Rainer, Frampton, et al. Three take-home essay exams. Class size: 25

 

11467

FILM 223   Graphic Film Workshop

Peter Hutton

. . . . F

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PART

This course explores the materials and processes available for the production of graphic film or graphic film sequences. It consists of instruction in animation, rephotography, rotoscoping, and drawing on film and of viewing and discussing a number of films that are primarily concerned with the visual.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Interested students should contact Prof. Hutton (hutton@bard.edu) prior to registration.  

Class size: 12

 

11901

FILM 241   Cinema under Communism

Ian Buruma

           Screening:

M . . . .

S . . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

5:00 -7:00 pm

AVERY 338

PRESTON 110

AART

Cross-listed: Human Rights  This course will showcase feature films made in countries under communist regimes, roughly from the end of World War Two until the late 1980s. Some will be overtly propagandistic (Sergei Eisenstein’s films, for example), others will be subversive in the sense of taking a critical stance: the satirical films made by Milos Forman or Jiri Menzel during the Prague Spring; the sexual explorations by Dusan Makavejev in the former Yugoslavia, or Andrzej Wajda’s films. And there will be some – again Wajda, or Elem Klimov – that are not so much political as humanistic. Films made in China, during the Maoist period and after, will also be selected. Familiarity with these works, selected on the grounds of artistic quality as well as social or political interest, will enable the class to delve into such issues as censorship, propaganda, and dissidence. We will see how artists cope with the restrictions of authoritarian rule. Because the movies will come from many different countries and periods, we will discuss cultural and social differences inside the communist world as well. By way of contrast, we will consider some aspects of cinema under fascism, so that we can draw out differences as well as similarities between totalitarian systems.Class size: 20

 

11472

FILM 242   Script to Screen

Kelly Reichardt

. . W . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

AVERY 110

PART

This is a live-action film workshop. Concentration will be on the narrative form as a means of exploring visual storytelling strategies. Students will collectively produce a dramatic re-creation of the 1929 Hitchcock film BLACKMAIL. Each student will produce, direct and edit a sequence of the feature-length film.  Class size: 12

 

11895

FILM 244   The Conversation

Kelly Reichardt

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PART

This is a live-action film workshop. This production class will investigate approaches to storytelling and the narrative form with a goal towards identifying the subtext within given dialogue scenes. Students will locate “the lie” in the spoken word and “the truth” through visual indicators; exploring the impact that camera placement, blocking, the use of narrative beats and editing have on a particular scene. Students will discover how their filmmaking choices support, undermine or contradict what their characters are saying.  Class size: 12

 

11900

FILM 245   Documentary and Social Media Workshop

Pacho Velez

. . W . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

AVERY 217

 

Cross-listed: Anthropology, Human Rights What real world relationships between individuals, social classes, genders, races and cultures have the necessary friction to generate compelling images for today’s filmmakers?  This class will draw on readings, screenings, and production assignments to introduce you to the craft, history and theory underlying documentary film production with an eye on the concerns that motivate you and that animate your work.  Open to students with cross- disciplinary interests with priority given to those with production experience. This class fulfills a moderation requirement for the F&EA Program. Class size: 12

 

11468

FILM 256   Introduction to Writing the Film

So Kim

. T . . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

AVERY 117

PART

Cross-listed: Written Arts  An introductory writing course that looks at creative approaches to writing short films and dialogue scenes. There will be writing and research exercises, screenings, discussions, readings and script critiques. The course will focus on researching and developing ideas and structure for stories, building characters, poetic strategies and writing comedic, realistic and awkward romantic dialogue. 

Class size: 12

 

11469

FILM 325   Writing the Film: Science Fiction and Adaptation

So Yong Kim

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 117

 

An intensive workshop-based course is designed to explore the sci-fi genre and develop an original or an adapted science fiction screenplay. The course topics will include discussions on a wide range of possibilities within the genre from biological threats to killer robots. Students will be asked to read classic science fictions for adaptation exercises and analyze classic science fiction films such as La JetéeSolaris, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Bladerunner.   The goal of the course will be to complete a short science fiction script. Pre-requisite: Film 256 - Writing the Film or the successful completion of a sophomore level production class.  Non-majors must email the professor prior to registration for approval. Class size: 12

 

11462

FILM 342   Stereoscopic 3D Video Production

Ben Coonley

           Screening:

. . W . .

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

5:00 -7:00 pm

AVERY 117

AVERY 117

PART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities   This course introduces methods for producing three-dimensional video using stereo cameras and projection systems that exploit binocular vision. We examine moments in the evolution of 3D technology and historical attempts at what André Bazin called “total cinema," considering the perceptual and ideological implications of apparatuses that attempt to intensify realistic reproductions of the physical world. Students attend weekly screenings of a broad range of 3D films, including classic Hollywood genre movies, contemporary blockbusters, short novelty films, independent narratives, animations, industrial films, documentaries, avant-garde and experimental artworks. Creative assignments challenge students to explore the expressive potential of the 3D frame (the “stereoscopic window”) while developing new and experimental approaches to shooting and editing 3D images. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

11897

FILM 354   Curating Cinema

Ed Halter

           Screening:

. . . Th .

. . W . .

2:00 -4:30 pm

5:00 -7:00 pm

CCS

AVERY 110

AART

This seminar explores the history, theory and practical concerns of film curating, both in and out of the context of the art world. As a way of investigating the range of possibilities for modes of exhibition, the course will look at pre-cinematic technologies of the projected image; various models employed in the silent era; early alternatives to the Hollywood system, including cine-clubs, “small cinemas,” road shows, and exploitation; later examples such as cinematheques, film festivals, and microcinemas; expanded cinema and projection performance; different attempts to introduce film and video into spaces traditionally devoted to visual art; and the role of collections and archives. Individual case studies will include the Museum of Modern Art’s Film Library, Amos Vogel’s Cinema 16, Anthology Film Archives, the Collective for Living Cinema, the Whitney’s New American Filmmakers series and the exhibition Into the Light, and contemporary developments. Coursework will include a research and analysis paper on one example of 20th century film exhibition, a detailed technical evaluation of a screening or exhibition, and a final curatorial project.  Class size: 6 CCS students, and 6 undergraduates.  *All undergraduates must submit an application in advance in order to register for the course; please contact the professor for details.

Class size: 12

 

11899

FILM 358   Auteur Studies: Hitchcock, von Sternberg, Powell

Richard Suchenski Screenings begin @ 7:00

. . W . .

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

7:00 pm -

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

In this seminar, we will undertake a comparative study of major directors, with the focus and theme changing each time the course is offered.  This time, the course will be oriented around three European-born directors who began in the silent era: Alfred Hitchcock, Josef von Sternberg, and Michael Powell.  Each filmmaker returned to the same genres and forms repeatedly over the course of careers lasting for several decades and each mobilized the unique resources and production conditions of the commercial film industries of their countries to make deeply personal statements.  Special attention will be paid to questions of film style and to the relationship with Symbolism, Expressionism, and fin de siècle aestheticism.  Key films by each director – and by related figures such as Luis Buñuel, François Truffaut, and Claude Chabrol – will be studied using 35mm prints.  We will read a range of relevant criticism, along with historical material and literary works by Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, and Pierre Louÿs. Upper-college students who have taken relevant courses in film or art history will have priority.   Class size: 14

 

11898

FILM 405   Senior Seminar

Effi Weldon

. T . . .

5:00 -7:00 pm

AVERY 110

 

As an established component of the Film Program's requirements for all majors, the Senior Seminar is an opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among the seniors working on Senior Project. The course will have a number of film and video makers in to discuss their process and techniques, artistic life-after-Bard skills workshop, a review of distribution and grant writing opportunities and critique of works in progress. The course is an integral aspect of Senior Project for all seniors in Film and carries no additional credit.   Class size: 20