11798

BIO 121 Obesity

Michael Tibbetts

Lab:

. . W . F

. T . . .

8:30 -9:50 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 101

RKC 112

SCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int値 Studies According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than one-third of U.S. adults, and 17% of children and adolescents, are obese. The estimated annual cost of obesity was $147 billion in 2008. This course will explore the potential factors contributing to the obesity epidemic, by examining epidemiological and experimental evidence. These factors include: behavior, evolution, genetics/physiology, and microbiome. In the laboratory we will explore the influence of genetics on obesity as well as the efficacy of interventions, using an emerging model system for the study of metabolism and obesity, zebrafish. Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic, and experience in high school biology and chemistry. Class size: 18

 

11496

BIO 122 The Science of Creativity

Amy Savage

M . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 115

SCI

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities What makes someone creative? How do we quantify creativity? Can creative skill be inherited or is it learned?  Do factors such as health influence a person痴 creative aptitude? Is there an evolutionary advantage to being creative? What is the boundary between art & science? Can one area of inquiry provide information about the other? In this class, students will consider art, artistic expression and creativity through the lens of several core life science concepts, including genetics, inheritance, genotype vs. phenotype, gene expression, and natural selection.  Finally, students will consider the relationship of the human brain and creative expression. Intended for non-majors. No specific science background is required.

This course includes two mandatory, all day field trips, both to be held on Fridays. Students taking this class are expected to attend both. Dates TBA

Class size: 18

 

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11498

BIO 142 A Organismal Biology

William Maple

LAB A

. . W . F

. . . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 103

RKC 114

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies, Global & Int値 Studies An introduction to organismal biology and ecology, primarily for those who intend to continue in biology; also open to interested students not majoring in science. Topics include population genetics, evolution, vertebrate embryology and anatomy, and animal phylogeny, taxonomy, and ecology. Biology 142 may be taken before Biology 141, if necessary. Students majoring in biology are strongly encouraged to enroll in Chemistry 142 concurrently. Prerequisite: passing score on part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic.

Class size: 36

 

11497

BIO 142 B Organismal Biology

William Maple

LAB B

. . W . F

. . . . F

10:10 - 11:30 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 103

RKC 114

SCI

See above.

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12052

BIO 144 Biostatistics

Samuel Hsiao

. . W . F

1:30 -4:00 pm

ALBEE 100

MATC

Cross-listed: Mathematics, Environmental & Urban Studies, Global & Int値 Studies This course introduces students to the statistical methods biologists use to describe and compare data. Students will learn methods are appropriate for different types of data. Topics covered include elementary probability and statistics, characteristics of frequency distributions, hypothesis testing, contingency tests, correlation and regression analysis, different ways to compare means, nonparametric tests, and an introduction to multivariate tests. This course is intended for sophomore and junior biology majors, although it is open to students of all years.  One objective of the course is to provide biology majors the statistical background they need to analyze data for their own senior research; biology students should take this course before their senior year, if possible. Notice, though, that the topics in this course are applicable to many advanced courses. Prerequisite: passing score on part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic and at least one introductory biology course. Class size: 18

 

11799

BIO 148 Zoology for Non-majors

Aris Efting

Lab:

. T . Th .

. . . Th .

 

10:10 - 11:30 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 115

RKC 112

SCI

In Zoology, students will learn the fundamental concepts of biology through the study of animals. We will explore the diversity of life on the planet while learning about the evolutionary relationships between the major groups of animals, ranging from the microscopic to humans. Students will recognize that all animals perform the same functions using a variety of interesting adaptations. Key concepts will include macromolecules, cell organization, cellular respiration, mitosis, meiosis, genetics, ecology, evolution, and ecosystem studies. A primary function of the course is to help students develop scientific literacy, and to increase students' excitement and interest in the biological sciences. During our laboratory investigations, we will apply the logic of scientific thinking to build testable hypotheses, carry out experiments, and collect and analyze data. It is guaranteed the student will be exposed to animals they've never seen or heard of before! Class size: 18

 

11801

BIO 150 Evolution of Model Organisms

Philip Johns

Lab:

M . W . .

M . . . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 101

RKC 114

SCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int値 Studies This is an introductory course intended for students with a strong interest in the sciences.  The goal of the course is to study the genetics and evolution of a variety of organisms.  We will also examine the interplay between genetics and evolution with topics ranging from ecology to behavior to physiology to biomechanics. A major theme of the course will be to understand why biologists often use a few "model organisms" -- including dogs -- to answer questions that apply to a broader array of plants and animals. The course includes a lab and one or two field trips.  Prerequisites: passing score on part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic and at least one introductory biology course. Class size: 18

 

11499

BIO 151 From Genes to Traits

Michael Tibbetts

. . W . F

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 111 / 112

SCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int値 Studies; Science, Technology & Society This course takes an introductory look at the relationships between genetics, environment, and biochemistry. It is intended for students with a strong interest in science and is appropriate for biology majors. The course will begin with an examination of heredity in both classical and modern molecular contexts. It will then focus on the relationships between genes and proteins, and the complex biochemical interactions that produce a phenotype. The course will culminate in a discussion of the ways in which the environment interacts with multiple genes to influence complex traits, for example schizophrenia, and the modern methods applied to the problem of identifying the genetic components of these traits. The laboratory will provide an opportunity to examine some of the principles discussed in the lecture in more detail and to become acquainted with some of the methodologies and instrumentation found in a modern biology laboratory. Prerequisites: passing score on part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic, and experience in high school biology and chemistry. Class size: 18

 

11501

BIO 201A Genetics & Evolution

Brooke Jude

M . W . .

8:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 111 / 112

SCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int値 Studies This course is an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance and the generation of diversity within genomes. It takes a modern approach to the study of genetics in which classical ideas about genotype, phenotype and inheritance are integrated into the modern genomic understanding of the processes involved in the generation of diversity and its influence on phenotype. In addition to discussions of the molecular mechanisms involved in processes like, recombination, the generation and repair of mutations, and the relationship between genotype and phenotype, special consideration is given to population-level variation in complex traits and how this understanding can be used to: examine population structure, identify genes associated with complex traits, and examine evolutionary trends and mechanisms. The laboratory consists of a semester long project involving the analysis of a model organism痴 genome to address one or more topics in the course. Prerequisite: One semester of college-level biology. Class size: 18

 

11502

BIO 202B Ecology & Evolution

Felicia Keesing

. . W . F

8:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 114 / 115

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies This core course for biology majors is an introduction to the general principles of ecology and evolution that, with genetics, form the core of biological understanding. In addition to studying foundational ideas in both ecology and evolution, we will explore modern topics at the boundary between these two areas. We will consider, for example, how genetic variation among individual organisms can influence ecological interactions, and how these interactions can influence fitness. We will focus on a mechanistic understanding of processes, using model-building to inform that understanding. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Genetics and Evolution (Bio 201) Class size: 18

 

11503

BIO 208 Biology Seminar

Michael Tibbetts

. . . T .

12:00 1:00 pm

RKC 103

N/A

1 credit This course will provide students with broad exposure to biology through the biology visiting speaker seminar series. Students will hear about the wide-ranging research interests of invited biologists and have opportunities to interact informally with them. The course is graded Pass/Fail and students are responsible for short follow-up assignments for at least 80% of the talks. Recommended for all biology majors and other interested students.

Class size: 60

 

11504

BIO 303 Microbiology w/ Lab

Brooke Jude

Lab:

. T . Th .

. T . . .

8:30 -9:50 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 115

RKC 114

SCI

This course is designed to investigate the principles of microbiology that make microbes unique. A systems based approach is taken, examining such topics as microbial cell structure and function, bacterial motility and chemotaxis, secretion systems, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and antibiotic resistance. The course examines primarily bacterial species, however a limited amount of time is devoted to the biology of eukaryotic microbes. The laboratory portion of the course is a semester long, inquiry based, team project that involves examination of local microbial populations using culture, molecular and biochemical approaches. The class will require lab work to be completed outside of the class times. Students will analyze primary literature and produce peer reviewed research manuscripts. This course is appropriate for both those interested in a career in the health professions and those interested in ecology. Class size: 15

 

11505

BIO 311 Field Ornithology

Bruce Robertson

Lab:

. T . Th .

. . . . F

1:30 -2:50 pm

8:30 - 12:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 112

 

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies This course will present birds both as a unique group and as representative of vertebrates. It will emphasize adaptation, ecology, and behavior of birds, the physical basis of flight, and introduce students to laboratory and field methods used in modern ornithology. We also will consider current views of the systematic relationships among living birds, and the evolutionary history of birds, including the debate regarding their origin in relation to dinosaurs and the origin of flight. Finally, we will examine case studies in bird conservation to understand the interaction of human and biological causes of, and solutions to, those problems. The laboratory portion of the class will include instruction in identification of all regional bird species by sight and sound. This will include field trips to local habitats / biological reserves and the study of museum specimens. Students will design and conduct small-scale behavioral research experiments (e.g. bioacoustics) with on-campus bird populations and will exploit publicly available and continental-scale databases to ask questions about bird ecology, evolution or conservation which will be submitted as both an oral report and scientific research paper. Class size: 20

 

11802

BIO 315 Advanced Evolution

Philip Johns

Lab:

. T . Th .

. W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 122

RKC 114

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Mind, Brain & Behavior Evolution is one of the primary ties that bind the discipline of biology together.  "Nothing in biology makes sense except in light of evolution", someone observed.  In this class we will examine how biologists study evolution on several levels.  We will examine the various forces of evolution.  We will use population and quantitative genetics to address fundamental questions in biology.  We will examine patterns of evolution within and among populations, across species, and we will learn tools that let us address cross-species comparisons.  Although this is not a paleontology class, we will examine evolutionary patterns through time.  We will also examine what evolution can reveal about other disciplines, such as medicine, and how modern genomic and bioinformatic techniques both rely on evolutionary principles and have revolutionized how evolutionary biologists do our jobs.  This class includes a laboratory and one or two field trips. Class size: 15

 

11803

BIO 330 Freshwater Biology

Aris Efting

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 112

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies 2 credits This course will address the physical, chemical and biological properties of lakes and streams. In addition, students will learn about the effects watersheds and wetlands have on freshwater systems. Special attention will be given to nutrient dynamics along with food webs. Students will learn to identify the most common organisms in freshwater systems. Anthropogenic impacts such as climate change, pollutants, and invasive species on freshwater systems will be examined. Students will look at methods for restoring lakes and streams as well as paleolimnologic methodologies for identifying past water quality. Research articles will be used to introduce key concepts in aquatic ecology. These topics will be reinforced through hands-on experience in the field and laboratory. Prerequisites: General Chemistry 141 and 142, Biology 201 and 202. Class size: 15

 

12340

BIO 424 Seminar in Conservation Biology

Bruce Robertson

. . . Th .

3:10 -5:10 pm

RKC 200

 

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies 2 credits In this class we will explore the vast field of biodiversity and environmental conservation. Biodiversity conservation now spans many disciplines, including ecology, economics, sociology, finance, and psychology. Conservation biology is highly interdisciplinary, requiring careful consideration of both biological and sociological issues associated with human activity (e.g. urbanization). Utilizing articles from the primary literature, this course will focus on topics such as the effects of habitat fragmentation, loss of genetic diversity, endangered species breeding programs, introduced species, and climate change, as well as how to determine appropriate conservation priorities. We will also explore some very controversial and cutting edge topics (e.g. novel and designer ecosystems, assisted migration). This is primarily a discussion-based class where we read from the primary literature, but the course will also include guest-visits and talks from conservation scientists and practitioners and a field trip to the site of a regionally-relevant conservation project. Class size: 15

 

11805

BIO 423 Behavioral Genomics

Peter Oxley

M . . . .

12:00 -2:00 pm

RKC 200

SCI

2 credits Social behavior is one of the most complex biological phenomena to have evolved on Earth, and has contributed to the huge ecological success of those organisms showing the highest levels of social organization - ants, bees and termites. In this seminar, we will look at the ecology, genetics and evolution of social behavior. Using the current literature and a problem based learning approach, the course will span neurogenetics, genetic imprinting, collective decision making, cooperation and cheating, and division of labor. Prerequisite: Upper College standing in biology. Class size: 15