COURSE LIST ADDENDUM -- December 6, 2013

New courses:

 

12337

ART 108 LB2  Drawing I

Laura Battle

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 149

PART

The goal of this introductory course is to give students confidence and facility with basic technical and perceptual drawing skills and to further develop visual awareness. Focus will be on learning how to “see” in order to translate 3D objects into 2D equivalents. We will therefore be working from direct observation for a majority of the time. A variety of drawing techniques and media will be introduced. Regular critiques will be held, in which the students develop a useful vocabulary aiding them to further discuss and think about their art practices.  Class size: 14

 

 

12340

BIO 424    Seminar in Conservation Biology

Bruce Robertson

. . . Th .

3:10 -5:10 pm

RKC 200

 

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies  2 credits  In this class we will explore the vast field of biodiversity and environmental conservation. Biodiversity conservation now spans many disciplines, including ecology, economics, sociology, finance, and psychology. Conservation biology is highly interdisciplinary, requiring careful consideration of both biological and sociological issues associated with human activity (e.g. urbanization). Utilizing articles from the primary literature, this course will focus on topics such as the effects of habitat fragmentation, loss of genetic diversity, endangered species breeding programs, introduced species, and climate change, as well as how to determine appropriate conservation priorities. We will also explore some very controversial and cutting edge topics (e.g. novel and designer ecosystems, assisted migration). This is primarily a discussion-based class where we read from the primary literature, but the course will also include guest-visits and talks from conservation scientists and practitioners and a field trip to the site of a regionally-relevant conservation project. Class size: 15

 

12051

MUS 238  The  History and Literature of Electronic and Computer Music

Richard Teitelbaum

. . W .  .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

BLM N211

AART

In the 1920’s, a number of new electronic instruments such as the Theremin, the Ondes Martenot and the Trautonium were invented, and a number of composers, including Hindemith and Messiaen, composed new works for them.  After the invention of  magnetic recording tape in the late 40’s electronic music became an enterprise that was produced in special studios and fixed on tape for later playback. Starting around 1960, John Cage and David Tudor began experimental performances with such works as Cartridge Music (1960), Variations II and other pieces that reintroduced the live performer to the electronic medium.  Many composers, such as Mumma, Behrman, Lucier, Ashley, Stockhausen, Nono, and Boulez, as well as collective improvisationally-based groups such as AMM Music in London, and Musica Elettronica Viva in Rome soon followed suit.  During the 60’s and 70’s, with the advent of smaller and the more personal synthesizers invented by Moog, Buchla and others, the field of live electronic music became a practical reality. Some ten years later, a similar sequence of events took place with regard to computer music, where the large mainframes of the 50’s and 60’s were superseded by the PC revolution of the late 70’s and 80’s.  This was followed by the more recent development of the laptop that has enabled performers to carry powerful, portable computers on stage. This course will trace these developments, examine the literature of the field, encourage live performances of “classic” pieces, and the creation and performance of new compositions and improvisations. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken in conjunction with Electro-Acoustic Ensemble.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 15

 

12052

BIO 144   Biostatistics

Samuel Hsiao

. . W . F

1:30 -4:00 pm

ALBEE 100

MATC

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies, Global & Int’l Studies     This course introduces students to the statistical methods biologists use to describe and compare data. Students will learn methods are appropriate for different types of data. Topics covered include elementary probability and statistics, characteristics of frequency distributions, hypothesis testing, contingency tests, correlation and regression analysis, different ways to compare means, nonparametric tests, and an introduction to multivariate tests. This course is intended for sophomore and junior biology majors, although it is open to students of all years.  One objective of the course is to provide biology majors the statistical background they need to analyze data for their own senior research; biology students should take this course before their senior year, if possible. Notice, though, that the topics in this course are applicable to many advanced courses. Prerequisite: passing score on part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic and at least one introductory biology course. Class size: 18

 

12178

HR 221   Queer Subjects of Desire

Robert Weston

. T . Th .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

OLIN 203

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Gender & Sexuality Studies  Over the past two decades, preliminary discourse-shaping debates between proponents of Gay & Lesbian Studies and proponents of Queer Theory have proliferated into a rich array of subfields in the research on gender and sexuality. This course will engage students in some of the core issues that have shaped the widening field of sexuality studies. The course will be organized into a series of units, each devoted to a particular approach to the study of sexuality and gender: units vary, but may include: The Subject of Desire; Psychoanalysis; Gender Theory; Feminism; Desiring Capitalism; The History of (Homo)Sexuality ; Homosexuality & the Law; Ethnosexualities; Sexuality & Race; Transgender. Class size: 22

 

12179

HR 345   Aesthetics of the Common

Jeannine Tang

. . W .  .

10:30 – 1:00 pm

CCS Sun Room

HUM

In the wake of protracted global financial and ecological crises, we have seen renewed attention to the idiom of the commons. Theorists, artists and activists have reinvested in modalities of the commons, to refute the enclosure of social relations under late capitalism, and reimagine the ownership, sharing and dispersal of resources. Recent cultural theory has also expanded the category of aesthetics, by parsing its distribution of sense and extension of affect into sites of biopolitical order, to examine how aesthetics might prefigure potential institutions, norms and practices of communization. The commons, for many thinkers, are a site of contradiction: both a threshold through which one might overcome capital accumulation, while nonetheless saturated by the virtual experience of biopolitical disciplining. We will work through the ways in which aesthetic inquiry mediates the emergence of the commons, and how sense and culture might themselves constitute areas of communization. This course is cross-listed with CCS.  Interested students should contact Professor Tang, (jtang@bard.edu) prior to registration.

 

12177

HUM 236  On the Road: Anti-Social Images, Sounds, Writing

Francesca Slovin /

Geoff Waite

. . . . F

1:00 –  4:00 pm

OLIN 301

None

1 credit From antiquity to the present, traveling remains a privileged “metaphor” (‘to travel across,’ ‘to transfer,’ ‘to translate’) in virtually all social and cultural activities: spatial and temporal, psychological and physical, physical and metaphysical.  Against this vast historical backdrop, our course focuses on that moment in the 1950s and ‘60s and thereafter (in America and Europe) when people (male and female, couples and loners) either chose or are forced to be “on the road,” and there to commit various anti-social acts, including robbery and murder. Also important is what happens when the written word is transferred or translated into audio-visual media and vice versa. What is lost in translation?  As science fiction has told what is always already known: this road is through space but also as “time travel.” We begin this course with the traffic jam (l’ingorgo) and then experience where tourists and travelers are headed.  This course will meet for 5 weeks, February 7th  March 7th.

 

12327

MUS WKSPO   Introduction to Electronic Music

Marina Rosenfeld

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

4 credits This hands-on workshop will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog tools and processes. Students will be introduced to foundational practices in electro-acoustic sound production and their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on signal processing, studio and field recording, and modes of diffusion, including multichannel installation and live performance, as well as receive instruction in ProTools for multi-track recording, editing, and mixing. Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring contemporary approaches to electronic music software and technology. Enrollment in this course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios. In addition to the digital workstations, students can also explore analog synthesis techniques using the vintage Serge modular synthesizer. Class size: 15

 

12319

PHOT 316   Art & the Uses of Photography

Barbara Ess

. . W .  .

10:10 – 1:10 pm

WDS

PART

Open to 300+ level students (and 200-level by permission of the instructor) in all disciplines with a strong interest in investigating and producing art using photographic imagery. The course will focus on the use of photography as a material or tool in artmaking. Students will create a body of work using photographic imagery, digital and print media and other means of representation and reproduction. There will be readings and discussions on the history, meaning and theory of the use of photography in art. The class will visit galleries and museums to look at and consider photographic-based work in contemporary art practice. The course does not involve darkroom instruction and facilities will only be available on a limited basis to students with prior experience. There will be basic instruction and access to digital printing and scanning.

 

12322

PS 239   The United Nations and Model U.N.

Jonathan Becker /

James Ketterer

. . . . F

1:30pm – 2:50 pm

OLIN 202

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights   1 credit* This is a year-long course,  divided into two parts. The first part will explore the history of the United Nations and will introduce students to its structure and principal aims. It will also focus on the role of specialized agencies and the ways in which alliances impact on the UN’s day-to-day operations. The second part of the course will focus on an assigned country (for each Model UN, each college is assigned a country to represent. It will entail a study of the country’s history, politics and economics and will conclude with the writing of ‘position papers’ that reflect that country’s approach to issues confronting the UN. In addition, there will be a public speaking component. Students taking the course will have the opportunity to participate in a Model United Nations. Students wishing to enroll should e-mail jbecker@bard.edu with 1-2 paragraphs indicating why they would like to participate. Class size: 15

 

 

Additional FYSEM section:

 

12055

FSEM II

JW

Jean

Wagner

. T  Th .

4:40 pm – 6:00 pm

OLIN 107

 

 

Schedule changes:

 

11421

ART 109 LO  Printmaking I: Introduction to Intaglio (Etching)

Lothar Osterburg

. T . . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER 139

PART

 

11423

ART 210 LO  Printmaking II: 

Experimental Printmaking

Lothar Osterburg

M . . . .

1:30 -4:40 pm

UBS /

FISHER 139

PART

 

11733

ARTH 244   Contemporary African Art

Teju Cole

M . W . .

1:30 – 2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AART/DIFF

 

11499

BIO 151   From Genes to Traits

Michael Tibbetts

. . W . F

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 111 / 112

SCI

 

11651

EUS 102   Introduction to Environmental Science

Christopher Bowser

. T . Th .

6:20 – 7:40pm

OLIN 201

SSCI

 

11803

BIO 330   Freshwater Biology

Aris Efting

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 112

SCI

 

11900

FILM 245   Documentary and Social Media Workshop

Pacho Velez

. . W . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

AVERY 217

 

 

11897

FILM 354   Curating Cinema

Ed Halter

           Screening:

. . . Th .

. . W . .

2:00 -4:30 pm

5:00 -7:00 pm

CCS

AVERY 110

AART

 

11580

LIT 3090   Black Mountain College &

The Invention of Contemporary American Arts and Poetry

Ann Lauterbach

. . . Th .

3:10 -5:30 pm

OLINLC 120

ELIT

 

11600

SPAN 202   Intermediate Spanish II

Melanie Nicholson

M  T . Th .

8:40 -10:00 am

OLINLC 210

FLLC

 

11621

SOC 268  A New Look at Gentrification

Clement Thery

M . W . .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

HEG 308

SSCI

 

11535

12053

12054

PSY 204   Research Methods in Psychology

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

                 Lab A:

                 Lab B:

M . W . .

. . W . .

. . . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

1:30 -3:30 pm

10:30 - 12:30 pm

HEG 204

HDR 101A

HDR 101A

SCI

Students should register separately for a lab.

 

 

Cancelled courses:

 

11804

BIO 415   Advanced Seminar in Ecology:

Urban Ecology

Bruce Robertson

. . . Th .

3:10 -5:10 pm

RKC 200

SCI

(replaced with BIO 424)

 

11809

CHEM 142 LBE  Basic Princ of Chem II Lab

. TBA

. . . Th .

4:40 -6:45 pm

RKC 126

SCI

 

11827

MATH 146  Statistics and Data Analysis

Sam Hsiao

. . W . F

1:30 – 4:00 pm

ALBEE 100

MATC

This course is now listed under biology

 

11705

MUS 327   Introduction to Electronic Music

Marina Rosenfeld

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course is now listed as a music workshop

 

11750

PHOT 203 B  Color Photography

Barbara Ess

. . W . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

WDS

PART

 

 

 

Correction to distribution:

 

12030

CNSV 299   The Syntax of Natural Language

John Halle

. T. Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 104

SSCI

 

11969

PSY 141   Introduction to Psychological Science

David Shaenfield

M . W . .

11:50 - 1:10 pm

RKC 103

SSCI

 

 

Revised descriptions:

 

11767

DAN 120   Introduction to Contact Improvisation

Amii LeGendre

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

CAMPUS MPR

PART

Contact Improvisation (CI) is an improvisational duet dance form based on immediate response to sensation, weight, touch, and communication. This course explores states of presence, perception, awareness and responsiveness to one's self and environment. This course will cultivate these states as a broader context for a study of physical strategies related to gravity, momentum, flight, falling and rolling. This course will touch on creating scores for articulate improvising, witnessing and performing CI, and making space for open jamming and critical discussion on how you see and experience contact. CI is a rich opportunity for creative physical engagement with another person or group and is accessible to people of all physical abilities and experiences. Class size: 25

 

11474

FILM 109   Aesthetics of Film

Richard Suchenski

Screenings begin @ 7:00

. T . Th .

. . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

7:00 pm -

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Designed for first-year students, this course will offer a broad, historically-grounded survey of film aesthetics internationally. Key elements of film form will be addressed through close analysis of important films by directors such as Griffith, Eisenstein, Dreyer, Hitchcock, von Sternberg, Rossellini, Powell, Bresson, Brakhage, Godard, Tarkovsky, and Denis, the reading of important critical or theoretical texts, and discussions of central issues in the other arts.  Midterm exam, two short papers, and final exam.   Class size: 25

 

11695

MUS 367B   Jazz Composition II

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N210 / 211

PART

This class covers diatonic jazz harmony, starting with traditional forms of functional harmony, the interplay between the major and minor systems, followed by the progression of its breakdown into a more fluid, chromatic and open-form system.  Melodic styles, harmonic rhythm, modal interchange and modulation sequences will be examined, with the emphasis being on composing pieces, using as inspiration the material covered in class.. Class size: 15

 

11581

LIT 2607   Introduction to Literary Theory

Nancy Leonard

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 310

ELIT

Cross-listed: Gender & Sexuality Studies   Literary theory questions things we take to be common sense: that the meaning of an utterance or text is what the writer ‘had in mind,’ that writing ‘expresses’ some truth that lies elsewhere, that what we take to be ‘natural’ is free of bias.  In showing us alternative ways of thinking about literature and the real, theory shows us conditions of possible meaning and aesthetic pleasure.  This course introduces students to several different modern and contemporary writers about literature and the kinds of criticism they often represent. Among writers to be studied are Walter Benjamin, Julia Kristeva, Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida, Chinua Achebe, Henry L. Gates Jr., and Gayatri Spivak.  There will be several visits by other Bard literature scholars exploring with us their interest in particular theoretical problems. Students interested in the course should have had at least one Bard course in literature. 

 

11720

WRIT 422   Writing Workshop:Non-Majors

Robert Kelly

. . W . F

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 101

PART

A course designed for juniors and seniors, who are not writing majors, but who might wish to see what they can learn about the world through the act of writing. Every craft, science, skill, discipline can be articulated, and anybody who can do real work in science or scholarship or art can learn to write, as they say, “creatively.” This course will give not more than a dozen students the chance to experiment with all kinds of writing. No portfolio is needed.  Contact instructor via email before enrollment. Class size: 12

 

11907

PS 242   Public Opinion and the

Challenges of Democracy

Michiel Bot

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 308

SSCI

Public opinion is often considered the key legitimation of modern democratic politics. However, how public opinion is constituted and by whom has always been a matter of great controversy. For instance, various twentieth century thinkers have argued that while public opinion may ideally be the outcome of critical discussion among all citizens united in a well-informed public, in practice it is little more than ideology administered by the mass media to support the powers that be. Other critics have claimed that emotions rather than reasons are at the heart of democratic politics.  In this class, we will explore how theorists and critics of public opinion imagine the relations in democratic politics between truth and fiction; between the public and the private sphere; between speech and (“popular”) voice; between ideology and critique; and between reason and affect. We will give special attention to questions of representation and medium, and conclude by exploring the possibilities for public opinion in an age of globalization, blogs, and WikiLeaks. The syllabus will include work by Spinoza, Rousseau, Kant, Tocqueville, Marx, Mill, Lippmann, Schmitt, Gramsci, Adorno, Marcuse, Fanon, Arendt, Habermas, Derrida, and Rancière. Class size: 18

 

 

Correction to credits:

 

11810

CHEM 441   DNA / RNA: Structure & Functions of Nucleic Acid

Swapan Jain

. T . . .

4:35 -6:55 pm

RKC 122

 

Cross-listed:  Biology ,  4 credits

 

 

Professor changed:

 

11781

DAN WKSHP   Dance Workshop

Jean Churchill

. T . . .

6:15 -8:00 pm

FISHER PAC THORNE

PART

 

 

Correction to prerequisite:

 

11502

BIO 202B   Ecology & Evolution

Felicia Keesing

. . W . F

8:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 114 / 115

SCI

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Genetics and Evolution (Bio 201). 

 

 

Additional Cross-listings:

 

11871

ART 206 ED  Sculpture II:

Presence and Absence

Ellen Driscoll

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 138

PART

Cross-listed: Human Rights 

 

11798

BIO 121   Obesity

Michael Tibbetts

                   Lab:

. . W . F

. T . . .

8:30 -9:50 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 101

RKC 112

SCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies 

 

11801

BIO 150   Evolution of Model Organisms

Philip Johns

                            Lab:

M . W . .

M . . . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 101

RKC 114

SCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies 

 

11501

BIO 201A   Genetics & Evolution

Brooke Jude

M . W . .

8:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 111 / 112

SCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies 

 

11634

ANTH 206   Human Variation: The Anthropology of Race, Scientific Racism,  and other Biological Reductionisms

Mario Bick

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 301

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, Human Rights

 

11656

EUS 202   African Oil: New Scramble or

New Hope?

Robert Tynes

. T . Th .

3:10 – 4:30 pm

OLIN LC 115

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies, Human Rights 

 

11723

HIST / LAIS 120   Modern Latin America

Since Independence

Miles Rodriguez

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 310

HIST

Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights 

 

11892

HIST 3225   Global Latin American Conjunctures

Miles Rodriguez

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

HEG 200

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies,  Human Rights, LAIS 

 

11789

PHIL 216   Political Theory

Jay Elliott

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

RKC 115

HUM

Cross-listed:  Human Rights, Political Studies 

 

11910

PS 234   Occupy Political Theory

David Kettler

. T . . .

3:10 -5:30 pm

OLIN 302

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Human Rights 

 

11682

MUS / ANTH  253   Special Topics in Ethnomusicology: Popular Music and Politics in Africa

Andrew Eisenberg

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, Anthropology, Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights  

 

11807

LIT 3206   Evidence

Thomas Keenan

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

CCS

HUM

Cross-listed: Human Rights 

 

11854

PSY 337   The Psychology of Prejudice

and Stereotyping

Kristin Lane

. . W . .

10:10 – 12:30 pm

HEG 201

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Human Rights  

 

11941

WRIT 325   Translating "Illuminations," Illuminating Translation

Wyatt Mason

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLINLC 120

PART

Cross-listed:  French Studies

 

11796

HR 235   Dignity & the Human Rights Tradition

Roger Berkowitz

M . . Th .

4:40 – 6:00 pm

OLIN 202

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed: Philosophy, Political Studies

 

11818

CMSC 308   Mind, Brain & Behavior Seminar

Rebecca Thomas

. . W . .

6:30 -8:00 pm

RKC 101

MATC

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain & Behavior