11740

WRIT 121 A Beginning Fiction Workshop

Mary Caponegro

. T . Th .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

HEG 200

PART

This course involves both intensive reading and writing of the short story, and is intended only for first-year students who have made prior forays into the writing of narrative. Admission is by portfolio, with cover letter, due to Prof. Caponegro (Shafer House) on Wednesday, November 28th, by 5:00 pm. Class size: 12

 

11741

WRIT 121 B Beginning Fiction Workshop

Paul LaFarge

. T . Th .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

HEG 300

PART

See above. Admission is by portfolio, with cover letter, due to Prof. LaFarge (Shafer House) on Wednesday, November 28th, by 5:00 pm

Class size: 12

 

11741

WRIT 122 Introduction to Non-Fiction Writing

Wyatt Mason

M . W . .

1:30 pm – 2:50 pm

HEG 200

PART

This course will present the breadth of non-fiction as literature. We will begin by workshopping - i.e. reading and commenting on critically and insightfully - published pieces, pieces by Montaigne, De Quincy, Hazlitt, Baudelaire, Poe, Theodore Dreiser, Twain, D.H. Lawrence, Edmund Wilson, George Orwell, Joan Didion, Mary McCarthy, Hannah Arendt, Susan Sontag, John McPhee, Guy Davenport, Leonard Michaels, John Updike, Ben Metcalf, David Foster Wallace, Marilynne Robinson, Cynthia Ozick, Michael Paterniti, Jeanette Winterson, James Wood and John Jeremiah Sullivan. We will be workshopping these established writers to learn both what a piece of non-fiction writing is as well as to learn how to workshop something: it isn't a given! In addition to short writing exercises throughout the term, the course will build to a final assignment that will see students attempt substantive pieces of non-fiction writing of their own, guided by formal lessons learned through reading the best in the form. Admission is by portfolio, with cover letter, due to Prof. Mason (Shafer House) on Wednesday, November 28th, by 5:00 pm Class size: 12

 

11749

WRIT 123 First Poetry Workshop

Michael Ives

. T . Th .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 200

PART

Open to students who have never had a workshop in poetry, and who desire to experiment with making their own writing a means of learning, both about literature and poetry, and about the discipline of making works of art. Attention is mainly on the student's own production, and in the individual’s awareness of what sorts of activities, rhythms, and tellings are possible in poetry, and how poets go about learning from their own work. The central work of the course is the student's own writing, along with the articulation, both private and shared, of response to it. Readings will be undertaken in contemporary and traditional poets, according to the needs of the group, toward the development of familiarity with poetic form, poetic movement, and poetic energy. Attendance at various evening poetry readings and lectures is required. Admission is by portfolio, with cover letter, due to Prof. Ives (Shafer House) on Wednesday, November 28th, by 5:00 pm Class size: 12

 

11848

WRIT 2181 Reading and Writing the Personal Essay

Susan Rogers

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

OLIN 101

PART

This course will involve equal parts reading and writing and is for students who want to develop their creative writing, and their analytic thinking. Readings will be taken from Philip Lopate’s The Art of the Personal Essay, which traces the long tradition of the personal essay from Seneca, through Montaigne (the father of the personal essay) to contemporary stylists such as Richard Rodriguez and Joan Didion. The personal essay is an informal essay that begins in the details of every day life and expands to a larger idea. Emphasis will be placed on reading closely to discover the craft of the work: how scenes and characters are developed, how dialog can be used, how the form can fracture from linear narrative to the collage. Student’s work--three long essays--will be critiqued in a workshop format. This course is for students with experience in writing workshops, fiction writers and poets who want to explore another genre, and writers who enjoy expressing ideas through the lens of personal experience. Those who bring knowledge from other disciplines are encouraged to apply. Not available for on-line registration. Admission is by portfolio, with cover letter, due to Prof. Rogers by 5:00 p.m. on November 20th. Class size: 15

 

12229

WRIT 224   Literary Reportage

Ian Buruma

M . W .  .

10:10am – 11:30am

HEG 201

ELIT

This course will introduce the students to the art of journalism. At best, journalism can rise to literary excellence. We will be studying reportage as well as criticism, looking at examples of both genres since Macaulay’s contributions to the Edinburgh Review. The question is what lifts journalism to a higher literary level. We will consider some famous examples: John Hersey on Hiroshima, Michael Herr’s dispatches on the Vietnam War, Alma Guillermoprieto on Latin American politics, Hunter S. Thompson on the party conventions, V.S. Naipaul on Trinidad. Other questions dealt with in this course include the vexed one of literary license. Reportage by Ryszard Kapuscinski and Curzio Malaparte is fine literature, to be sure. Both claimed to be writing journalism. But they clearly made things up. Can a writer have it both ways: the license of fiction, and the claim to be presenting the truth? Finally, we will read some of the best critics, including Cyril Connolly, Edmund Wilson, and Pauline Kael. Class size: 15

 

11745

WRIT 324 Advanced Fiction Workshop

Paul LaFarge

. T . . .

3:10 pm -5:30 pm

OLIN 302

PART

A workshop in the creation of short stories, traditional or experimental, for experienced writers. Students will be expected to write several polished stories, critique each other's work, and analyze the fiction of published authors. Admission is by portfolio, with cover letter, due to Prof. LaFarge (Shafer House) on Wednesday, November 28th, by 5:00 pm. Class size: 12

 

11795

WRIT 330 Blown Deadlines: A Course

in Journalistic Writing

Wyatt Mason

M . . . .

7:00 pm -9:20 pm

Arendt Center

PART

Journalism: the word's root suggests writing that is disposable, good for a day but gone tomorrow. And yet, some of the richest writing in every era was supposed to serve only a passing moment but has endured nonetheless. This workshop will explore the endurance of the greatest examples of deadline writing, with readings from the old guard -- Johnson, De Quincey, Baudelaire, Twain, Orwell and others -- as well as from the recent past and present -- Guy Davenport, Leonard Michaels, Joan Didion, Norman Mailer, James Wood, Katharine Boo, John Sullivan and more. These readings will be married to writing by class members that will analyze the various forms we'll encounter -- personal essay; critical essay; narrative with argument; reported pieces (including profiles and process pieces); satires; hit pieces; and hybrids of all these -- as we attempt our own essays in these modes. Permission of instructor via email required prior to registration. Class size: 12

 

11744

WRIT 3500B Advanced Fiction: The Novella

Mona Simpson

TBA

 

.

PART

The second semester of a yearlong class, intended for advanced and serious writers of fiction, on the "long story" or novella form. Students will read novellas by Henry James, Flaubert, Chekhov, Flannery O'Connor, Allan Gurganus, Amy Hempel, and Philip Roth (and perhaps others) using these primary texts to establish a community of reference. We will discuss technical aspects of fiction writing, such as the use of time, narrative voice, openings, endings, dialogue, circularity, and editing, from the point of view of writers, focusing closely on the student's own work. The students will be expected to write and revise a novella, turning in weekly installments of their own work, and of their responses to the assigned reading. The course will meet six times over the semester, dates to be announced. Class size: 12

 

11791

WRIT 422 Writing Workshop: Non-Majors

Robert Kelly

. . W . F

11:50 am -1:10 pm

OLIN 101

PART

A course designed for juniors and seniors, who are not writing majors, but who might wish to see what they can learn about the world through the act of writing. Every craft, science, skill, discipline can be articulated, and anybody who can do real work in science or scholarship or art can learn to write, as they say, “creatively.” This course will give not more than a dozen students the chance to experiment with all kinds of writing, but in particular the creative essay. The creative essay is elastic allowing for meditations and rants, portraits and personal essays. We will read a range of works, then produce our own writings for critique. No portfolio is needed. Class size: 12

 

11909

WRIT 405 EM  Senior Colloquium: Written Arts

Edie Meidav

M . . . .

4:45pm -6:30 pm

OLIN LC 118

N/A

0 credits Written Arts Majors writing a project are required to enroll in the year-long Senior Colloquium.   Senior Colloquium is an integral part of the 8 credits earned for Senior Project.  An opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among students, the colloquium explicitly addresses challenges arising from research and writing on this scale, and presentation of works in progress.  A pragmatic focus on the nuts and bolts of the project will be complemented with life-after-Bard skills workshops, along with a review of internship and grant-writing opportunities in the discipline. Senior Colloquium is designed to create a productive network of association for student scholars and writers: small working groups foster intellectual community, providing individual writers with a wide range of support throughout this culminating year of undergraduate study in the major.  Class size: 20