By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have successfully completed three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course at the 300 level or above.  In addition, all music majors are required to successfully complete one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity with the approval of the Music Program Chairman; there is also a requirement for participation in a performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

 

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  A substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project. 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

 

College & Community Ensembles

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble, one or two credits may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered. See end of Music section for instructions on registering for lessons.

 

11515

MUS 104   Bard College Orchestra

Gregory Armbruster / Geoffrey McDonald

M . . . .

7:30 pm - 10:00 pm

FISH

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. BCO auditions for NEW members (those who did not participate in the fall term) will take place in the Sosnoff Theater on Monday, January 28, from 6:30 to 7:30 PM. Candidates should email Greg Armbruster (garmbrus@bard.edu) as soon as possible for a time slot. Plan to present two short excerpts of your choice, one fast, the other slow.  The first BCO rehearsal will be on 2/11/2013, from 7:30 to 10:00 PM, in the Sosnoff Theater.

Class size: 30

 

11516

MUS 105   Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30 pm - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

1 credit.  First rehearsal will be on Tuesday, February 5th, 2013. Class size: 35

 

11517

MUS 106   Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

TBA

 

.

PART

2 credits.   Class size: 20

 

11518

MUS 108B   Ensemble: Contemporary

Blair McMillen

. . . . .

 

.

PART

Class size: 20

 

11519

MUS 108D   Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:40 pm -6:40 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits Please make an appointment for auditions. The first rehearsal will be January 29, 2013

Class size: 30

 

11520

MUS 108F   Ensemble:Jazz

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

7:00 pm -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

11521

MUS 108G   Ensemble: Chamber/Cello

Garfield Moore

. . . . F

5:00pm-7:00pm

BLM HALL

PART

Class size: 10

 

11522

MUS 108H   Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

I Ketut Suadin

M . . . .

7:00 pm -9:00 pm

OLIN 305

PART

Class size: 22

 

11524

MUS 108J   Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

. T . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

11526

MUS 108N   Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:40 pm -6:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composer’s works, ranging from sextet to big band.  This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music.  There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester.  Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed.  Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer.  Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting.  Class size: 10

 

11525

MUS 108P   Ensemble: Baroque

Alexander Bonus

TBA

 

.

PART

Performance ensemble focusing on music from 1600-1750. Requires an audition for acceptance.  Class size: 14

 

 

COURSES

 

11527

MUS 122   Introduction to Music Theory

Blair McMillen

. T . . .

. . . Th .

4:40 pm -6:40 pm

11:50 am -1:10 pm

BLM N217

PART

This course will serve as an introduction to reading, studying, and analyzing tonal music. Introduction to Music Theory is geared toward non-music majors as well as potential music majors who have had little or no exposure to reading music. We will begin with the basics of musical notation, progressing to the identification of scales, triads, and seventh chords.  Class size: 20  (This course does not count towards the theory requirement for the music program.)

 

11528

MUS 172   Jazz Harmony II

John Esposito

M . W . .

10:10am - 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  Part II - This course will include acquisition of the basic skills that make up the Foundation of all jazz styles.  We will also study the Jazz Language from the BEBOP ERA up to the 60’s. This course fulfills a music theory/performance requirement for music majors. 

Class size: 20

 

11530

MUS 202   Music Theory II

Alexander Bonus /

Erika Switzer

M T W Th F*

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

BLM N217

PART

Continuation of Music Theory I, introduction to harmony, various seventh chords, secondary dominants, basics of modulation, four-part writing and voice-leading.  End result: ability to write a hymn, song or brief movement of tonal music.  Theoretical work will be complemented by ear-training classes focused on the singing and recognition of harmonies, score-reading and rhythmic studies. Prerequisite: Music Theory I or equivalent (knowledge of scales and keys).  This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.  *Note: course will meet 4 days weekly, to be determined. Two days cover theory, 2 days cover ear-training.)   Class size: 20

 

11531

MUS 211   Jazz in Literature I

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:10am - 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies  This course presents some of the short stories and poems by Rudolph Fisher, Langston Hughes, Ann Petry, and Julio Cortazar. The text used in this section is ‘Hot and Cool’ by Marcela Briton and the ‘Harlem Renaissance Reader’, edited by David Lewis.  Class size: 18    This course counts towards the music history requirement for the music program.

 

11532

CNSV/MUS 220   Music, Language, & Mind

John Halle

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

OLIN 106

AART

(4 credits)  A survey of recent work in musical cognition focusing on the connections between language and music.  Aniruddh Patel's recent  "Language, Music and the Brain” will serve as the main text augmented with additional readings by  Lerdahl, Baker, Jackendoff,  Meyer, Hayes and others. Among the broad questions we will attempt to address are the following.  Does the shared terminology we employ to refer to the basic elements of music and language-e.g. accent, rhythm, phrase, stress, etc.-  point  to underlying similarities in the two mental systems or does it obscure fundamental differences? What aspects of music are elucidated by the cognitive approach which forms the foundation of contemporary linguistics and what important characteristics of musical experience are, in principle, unanswerable by viewing music as a Chomskyan "natural object"?  Does the evidence offered by contemporary neuropsychological research indicate that linguistic and musical syntax make use of similar or distinct neural circuitry?  What kinds of empirical results would a definitive answer to this question require?  What evidence is there for a musi-language in our evolutionary history, which would later bifurcate into language and music as distinct expressive and cognitive systems? What are the connections between poetic meter as a formal pattern (as defined in traditional prosody), rhythmicized speech (as in rap, chant and nursery rhymes), settings of metrical poetry by composers and song form?  Some fluency with musical notation will be helpful but is not required.  Open to college and conservatory students.  Class size: 20

 

11529

MUS 237   Machine-Made Music, Past

and Present

Alexander Bonus

. T . Th .

10:10am - 11:30 am

BLM N217

AART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities; Science, Technology & Society  The forgotten term “mechanical music” once distinguished compositions born of human interpretation from those works created through a mechanized process. Using this designation, it can be argued how musical clocks, self-playing organs, phonographs, as well as today’s laptops and iPads form a single musical genre, whereby the living performer is largely useless. “Machine-Made Music” explores this alternate narrative of music culture, in which various technologies play the most important parts. By analyzing devices and their repertoire, we will discover how composers and inventors across history have drastically revised the connections between machinery and musicality.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for the music program.  Class size: 20

 

11896

MUS 241   History and Literature of

Electronic and Computer Music

David Behrman

M . . .

1:30 pm-3:50 pm

BLM N119

AART

Beginning with a brief survey of the earliest electronic instruments such as the Theremin and Ondes Martenot, this course examines the post-war development of the French School  of Musique Concrete, German Elektronische Musik and American Tape Music, among others.  Computer Music from early sound synthesis experiments at Bell Labs and elsewhere; Live Electronic Music from Cage and Tudor’s pioneering work to recent and current PC-based interactive “live” computer music; and multi-media works from ‘60’s “classics” to the present. Music studied will be drawn from the works of Varese, Schaeffer, Henry, Stockhausen, Cage, Leuning, Ussachevsky, Babbitt, Arel, Davidovsky, Boretz, Berio, Nono, Boulez, Pousseur, Xanakis, Martirano, Young, Reich, Oliveros, Subotnik, Musica Elettronica Viva (Rzewski, Curran, Teitelbaum) Takemitsu, Kosugi, Takahashi, Amacher, Sonic Arts Union (Mumma, Ashley, Lucier, Behrman) Matthews,  Risset, Tenney, Laurie Spiegel, Laurie Anderson, Brian Eno, George Lewis, Laetitia Sonami and other recent and current  developments, including the Ambient, Illbient and DJ scenes. Assignments will include extensive listenings, reading, research and analysis, as well as possible recreations of “classical” pieces from the repertoire and original compositional  and performance projects inspired by these studies. The class is a continuation/complement to Music 240 and is strongly recommended as a preparation for all electronic music studio courses. Class size: 15

 

11547

MUS 246   Improvisation:Theory/Practice

Marina Rosenfeld

. T . . .

. . W . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

BLM N119

BLM HALL

PART

This course, which replaces the Electro-Acoustic Ensemble for Spring Semester and fulfills a Performance requirement,  will be an in-depth scholarly and practical exploration of the many practices associated with improvised music-making in recent and contemporary music. Areas of study include experimental notation, free and structured improvisation, interactivity, game structures and live electronic music performance. Students will analyze and perform classic works from the field, as well as devise new structures, models and techniques for improvised music-making on their own instruments. Open to both acoustic and electronic musicians. Permission of the instructor required.  Class size: 15

 

11533

MUS 254B   Pronunciation and Diction

 for  Singers II

Erika Switzer

. T . Th .

10:10am - 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature.  The fall semester will be devoted to the English and Italian languages, the spring to German and French.  Through songs, arias, and oratorio literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language.  While it is geared towards singers and collaborative pianists, the course is also useful for conductors, other instrumentalists and students seeking to refine pronunciation and accent.  Grading will be based on a series four exams, including the preparation and performance of one song per language.  Ability to read music is not required.  No previous knowledge of the languages is required.  Class size: 15

11534

MUS 257   Production & Reproduction

Thomas Mark

. . . Th .

1:30 pm – 3:50 pm

BLM N117

PART

This course will focus on the theory and practice of sound recording. Students will learn the use of recording equipment including digital tape recorders, mixing consoles, signal processing devices, and microphones. A/B listening tests will be used to compare types of microphones, microphone placement and many different recording techniques. ProTools software will be available for digital editing and mastering to CD. Assigned projects will include both multitrack and direct to stereo recordings of studio and concert performances. Class size: 12

 

11535

MUS 265   Literature and Language

of Music II

Peter Laki

M . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

BLM N217

AART

A survey of selected musical works composed in the 19th and 20th centuries.  Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits.  In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams.  As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected.  This course is primarily designed for music majors including sophomores. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  It is not required that students have taken the first semester (Music 264), which covered music from the Middle Ages to 1800.  Class size: 20

 

11536

MUS 266C   Jazz Repertory: BEBOP Masters

John Esposito

M . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies  This performance based course is a survey of the principal composers and performers of the BEBOP Era.  Musicians included are Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro, Bud Powell, Max Roach and others.  The course will include readings, recorded music and films.  The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony I or permission of instructor. This can be taken as a companion course with Jazz Harmony II. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors. This course counts towards the music history/performance requirement for the music program.  Class size: 20 

 

11537

MUS 325   Between Music, Art

and Anthropology

Tomie Hahn

. T . . .

10:10am - 12:30pm

BDH

PART

Cross-listed: Anthropology. This seminar explores music, the arts, and culture from creative and ethnographic standpoints. Creative artists and ethnographers often share common practice-based investigations, resulting in a diversity of works that raise such issues as: ethics, advocacy, reflexivity, and collaboration. This is a project-based seminar—students will examine theoretical issues raised through their own musical/artistic creative work in conjunction with the study of the anthropology of the senses. Students will learn basic approaches to performance, fieldwork, and participant-observation to ask: how might I creatively display the “data” that I find?  No prior experience needed.  Class size: 10

 

11541

MUS 331   Jazz: The Freedom Principle I

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies   A jazz study of the cross-pollination between Post-Bop in the late fifties and Free Jazz. The course, which employs a cultural approach, is also designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music to examine its effects on the music from 1958 to the mid-sixties. Emphasis will be on artists and composers such as Cecil Taylor, Ornette Coleman, Art Blakey, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Max Roach, Eric Dolphy, Charles Mingus, and Horace Silver. Illustrated with recordings, films, and videos.  Class size: 15   This course counts towards the music history requirement for the music program. 

 

11540

MUS 341   Evolution of the Sonata

Kyle Gann

. . W . F

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

Sonata form is the most important collective achievement in European music, running from the early 18th century on and still influencing the way much music is written today. It was considered such a natural phenomenon that it was discussed as having been "discovered," not merely invented by mere humans, yet in many ways it was an artificial formula that killed as much music as it enlivened. This analysis course will study sonata form in its glorious heyday, before it was officially labeled by A.B. Marx in 1828. We'll start with primitive binary forms of Kuhnau and Sammartini, proceeding through works of C.P.E. Bach, Haydn, Clementi, Mozart, Dussek, Beethoven, Hummel, and Schubert. Along the way we'll learn techniques of musical logic that could still benefit composers today, as well as fleshing out a musical era that is too incompletely seen in terms of the Haydn-Mozart-Beethoven trio. This course is intended for musicians who have had Theory 1 and 2 or the equivalent, but any interested and qualified student is welcome.  This course counts towards the music theory requirement for the music program.  Class size: 15

 

11544

MUS 345   Introductory Psychoacoustics

Robert Bielecki

. T . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N117

AART

"Reality is a myth, perception is what matters".  This course will examine auditory perception and hearing and serve as an introduction to how hearing works. The first half of the semester begins with a description of the physiology and function of the ear and how we process auditory information.   Some topics include: perception of pitch, loudness, location, auditory illusions, critical bands, masking, threshold of hearing, hearing loss, and audiometry.   The second half of the semester will focus on sound localization and the technologies used in spatialization and 3-D audio. We will explore auditory localization cues, HRTF, binaural recording, spatial audio synthesis, sound for virtual realities and immersive environments. This course should be of particular interest to anyone involved in music and audio technology.  This course fulfills music theory requirements.  Class size: 15

 

11545

MUS 346   Interactive Performance

and Composition

Robert Bielecki

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

MAX/MSP is an object oriented graphical programming environment for algorithmic music composition, interactivity, live processing, multimedia and more.  This course covers beginning, intermediate, and advanced methods of using MAX/MSP.  This will be a hands-on course with examples from artist’s work, several programming assignments and a final project.  Knowledge of computer programming and MIDI is not necessary, but would be helpful. This fulfills music theory requirements.  Class size: 15

 

11546

MUS 352   Electronic, Acoustic, Computer Music Composition I

Marina Rosenfeld

. . W . .

10:10am - 12:30 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing, original work in the form of recordings, scores, and/or digital realizations. These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members. Installation and inter-media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Lucier, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor. This fulfills music theory requirement.  Class size: 15

 

11539

MUS 355   Death Set to Music

James Bagwell

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

This seminar will consist of in-depth analysis of Johannes-Passion (St. John Passion) and Matthäus-Passion (St. Matthew Passion) both by Johann Sebastion Bach (1685-1750).  Both of these works will be studied in a number of ways including musical analysis, text, performance style, theological and religious practice, and historical context.  The first half of the semester will focus on Johannes-Passion; during the second half, we will concentrate on Matthäus-Passion.  Your grade will be determined by the following: four reading summaries, two exams, and a term paper due at the end of the semester.  This class is designed to coincide with a performance of Johanne-Passion on March 1 and 2, 2013.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for the music program.   Class size: 15

 

11538

MUS 366A   Advanced Contemporary Jazz Techniques I

John Esposito

. . . Th .

11:50 am -2:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies  This course introduces methods for the jazz improviser to deconstruct and reorganize the basic harmonic and rhythmic elements for a composition.  Issues addressed will include reharmonization, remetering, metric modulation, variations in phrasing, tempo, and dynamics; that is, the arrangement and reorganization of compositional elements.  This is performance-oriented class and repertoire will include jazz standards and compositions of the instructor.  This class is open to moderated upper college students who have successfully completed Jazz Harmony I and II, and previous jazz repertory classes.  This course fulfills an upper level music theory requirement for music majors. Class size: 15  This course counts towards the music theory/performance requirement for the music program.

 

11548

MUS 367B   Arranging for Jazz Ensemble II

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 pm -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class will focus on the various techniques used in jazz ensemble writing, from sextet to big band ensembles. Classic tertiary voicings, cluster, quartal and line part writing will be covered. Final projects ranging from Sextet to Big Band will be recorded or performed live at the end of the semester. This is an advanced seminar class for moderated music majors. Prerequisite are Jazz Composition I and II or the permission of the instructor. Class size: 15

 

MUSIC WORKSHOPS: (2 credits unless otherwise noted)

 

11550

MUS WKSHA   Workshop: Composition

George Tsontakis

M . . . .

3:00 pm -5:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class and then  eventually to professionals(the  Da Capo Players) who give a concert of some of that music at the end  of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should email Prof. Tsontakis prior to registration to determine eligibility.

Class size: 18

 

11551

MUS WKSHB   Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart

. T . Th F

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

4:00 pm -6:30 pm

BLM HALL

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration.  Students choose one of the three sessions.  Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart  by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration.  Class size: 20

 

11552

MUS WKSHD   Sight Reading Workshop

Michael DeMicco

. T . . .

12:00 pm -1:00 pm

.

PART

2 credits  This workshop is designed to improve basic music reading skills.  Drawing from a varied selection of material such as lead sheets, jazz fake

book charts and simple to intermediate classical etudes, students learn to read melody and rhythm more confidently. This course works well for C

(concert) instruments and may be adapted for other instruments as well.  Class size: 12

 

11553

MUS WKSHF   Samba School

Carlos Valdez

. . W . .

. . . . F

4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

12:00 pm -2:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  Samba School provides the opportunity to learn exotic Brazilian rhythms (samba, maracatu, batucada, samba reggae).  All skill levels welcome.

Class size: 20

 

11885

MUS WKSH HB   Performance Workshop - American Tableaux

Helena Baillie

. . . . F

1:30pm- 3:00 pm

OLIN AUDT/

BLUM HALL

PART

Cross-listed: Dance

2 credits  American Tableaux sets multiple art forms in dynamic relation by inviting students from various arts to collaborate with music students towards a public performance. In planning, creating, producing, and performing an interdisciplinary event, we will seek original solutions to questions of visual, spatial, and aural coherence and contemplate how each discipline grows more or less distinct as it searches for definition against the others. Students will choose one or more musical works to form the basis of a collaborative piece. As a starting point, we will use George Tsontakis's KnickKnacks and Nico Muhly's Motion. From these evocative and effervescent works, we will add and create work to develop the final performance in accordance with the vision that we create collectively. Class time will be divided between performance and discussion groups. Each week, students will be asked to create program notes that describe the creative processes involved. This course is open to both Conservatory and Music Program students. Contact Helena Baillie by email: hbaillie@bard.edu to arrange an audition before registration.  Class size: 15

 

12148

MUS WKSHI   Intro to Electronic Music

Miguel Frasconi

. . W . .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

4 credits  This hands-on workshop will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus primarily on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog recording techniques and devices. Topics to be covered include the physics of sound, psychoacoustics, and foundational practices in electro-acoustic sound production and their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on digital signal processing, instrument "discovery" and exploration, field recording, and modes of electronic diffusion, including multichannel installation, live performance and multimedia. Students will be given instruction in the use of digital audio workstations (DAWs), and will become familiar with sampling, multi-track recording, editing, and mixing. Throughout the semester, students will produce field recordings and other original recordings in diary format and will receive instruction and guidance in utilizing this work for electronic composition, performance and installation. Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring the aesthetic, political, historical and personal implications of music technology and its uses. Enrollment in this course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios. In addition to the digital workstations, students can also explore analog synthesis techniques using the vintage Serge modular synthesizer.  Class size: 15

 

11554

MUS WKSHL   Workshop: Opera Workshop

Teresa Buchholz /

Rufus Muller /

Ilka LoMonaco

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits   Opera Workshop:  In the Fall Semester, we prepare a themed program of operatic excerpts (choruses, ensembles, solos), which is then performed in the Fisher Center, fully staged and with orchestra,  in the early part of the Spring Semester. Typically this involves intensive rehearsals during the week before Spring Semester, and evening rehearsals in the first week of semester. Students enrolling in the Fall Semester for two credits thus commit themselves to the final rehearsals and performances in the Spring Semester, which earn them an additional two credits.  Enrollment is by audition. Please contact Professors Müller (rumu2000@earthlink.net) and LoMonaco (ilka98@aol.com) for details. Class size: 20

 

11555

MUS WKSHM   A Passion for JSB

Rufus Muller

M . . . .

3:00 pm -5:20 pm

BDH

PART

In this performance class, we shall mainly work on arias and accompagnato recitatives from the St. John and St. Matthew Passions of Johann Sebastian Bach, as well as arias from the B-minor Mass and cantatas. Students will be required to have studied the music and language thoroughly beforehand.  Particular attention will be paid to diction, style, and effective communication with the audience. In addition there will be opportunities to explore the soundworld of baroque instrumental accompaniments with Alexander Bonus.  Class size: 16

 

11556

MUS WKSP4   Jazz Improvisation II

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:40 pm -7:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  This class is structured as a continuation of Jazz Improvisation I. The goal will be to gain mastery over all of the basic scales used in traditional jazz improvisation, and to attain the ability to improvise over basic two-five patterns and simple modal progressions. Prerequisite:  Jazz Improvisation Workshop I, or consent of the instructor.  Class size: 16

 

11557

MUS WKSP7   Jazz Vocal Workshop

Pamela Pentony

M . . . .

4:00 pm -6:59 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  Beginning level course:  The Jazz Vocal Workshop is a performance workshop designed to familiarize the beginning singer with the components of a successful jazz performance.  How to begin a song (intros) and how to end a song (outros and turnarounds), how to pick a key, a song and a tempo.  How to utilize simple (and not so simple) arrangements.  Particular attention is paid to phrasing.  The language of scat singing, with emphasis on practice in every class.  The forms of the blues, rhythm changes and 32 bar song form, and practical applications taken from The Great American Songbook.  There is one (or more) concert(s) scheduled during the semester and students are encouraged to seek out and perform in many local venues.  There is a final exam in this class.  Class size: 20

 

11549

MUS WKSPP   Orchestral and Festival Audition Preparation for String Players

Erica Kiesewetter

TBA

 

.

PART

This workshop will cover various aspects of preparing orchestral repertoire for orchestral and festival auditions. Knowledge of the style of the composer within the context of the score will be stressed, and players are expected to play in class weekly. The class will culminate with a mock audition to which outside adjudicators will be invited. Open to college and conservatory players by audition or recommendation.  Class size: 8

 

11794

MUS WKSH ES   Singing and Song in the Global Era

Erika Switzer

TBA

 

.

AART

This workshop explores the idea that the intersection of diverse musical traditions can be the means to a broader sense of repertory and expression. A survey of the work of selected singers and singing styles is designed to broaden the student’s range of expressive possibilities. The study of folk songs and folk song settings lays a foundation for working with less familiar languages and cultivating directness in communication.  This course is available to moderated voice majors by recommendation of the instructor and approval of the Conservatory's Vocal Arts Program. Class size: 12

 

1798

MUS WKSH ES2   English Diction

Erika Switzer

TBA

 

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AART

This course reviews the pronunciation and phonetic spelling of Neutral American English, Mid-Atlantic and British English and applies all pronunciations to solo vocal repertoire with regard to clarity, ease, expression, and interpretive choices.  This course is available to moderated voice majors by recommendation of the instructor and approval of the Conservatory's Vocal Arts Program. Class size: 12

 

 

SPECIAL PROJECTS:  Special Projects are designed for music majors only, to pursue individual or group projects with a particular professor.

 

11558

MUS PROJ EL  Special Projects

Erica Lindsay

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PART

 

11559

MUS PROJ JB  Special Projects

James Bagwell

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PART

 

11560

MUS PROJ JE  Special Projects

John Esposito

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PART

 

11561

MUS PROJ KG  Special Projects

Kyle Gann

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PART

 

11562

MUS PROJ LGR  Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

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PART

 

11563

MUS PROJ TB  Special Projects

Thurman Barker

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PART

 

PRIVATE LESSONS

 

Please Note: There is a $150.00 Private Lesson Fee each semester for any student taking private lessons.  If a student decides to drop private lessons they must fill out a Drop/Add form, have it signed by the appropriate department faculty and deliver it to the Office of the Registrar on or before Wednesday, February 13, 2013, 5 PM or they will be charged and responsible for the $150.00 Department Fee. Students who opt to take lessons not-for-credit will be responsible for the full cost of the lessons themselves.  Not available for on-line registration. Please note: you can audit an ensemble, but you cannot audit lessons.

Private Lessons are offered as follows:

 


      David Arner - piano (jazz, classical and improvisation)

      Teresa Buchholz – classical voice

      Michael Bukhman – classical piano

      Ira Coleman - jazz bass

      Kenny Davis - jazz bass

      Mike DiMicco - jazz guitar

      Greg Dinger - classical guitar 

      Daniel Fishkin -  Serge modular synthesizer

      James Fitzwilliam - coach and accompanist

      Laura Flax - clarinet

      Miguel Frasconi - electronic music

      Otto (Richard) Gardner - bass

      Greg Glassman - jazz trumpet

      Marka Gustavsson – violin, viola

      Stephen Hammer - oboe and recorder

      Ryan Kamm - classical bass

      Erica Kiesewetter – violin

      Ilka LoMonaco- classical voice

      Laura Majestic – harp

      Blair McMillen - piano

      Garfield Moore – cello

      Rufus Müller – classical voice

      Peter O'Brien - jazz drums

      Sakiko Ohashi - piano

      Pamela Pentony - voice (jazz)

      Elisabeth Romano - bassoon

      Pat Spencer - flute

      John Thomas, classical trumpet

      Carlos Valdez - Latin jazz percussion

      Alexander Waterman - cello

      Bruce Williams - classical saxophone