11648

FILM 106 Intro to Documentary Media

Ed Halter

Screening:

. . . . F

. . . Th .

10:10 am -1:10 pm

7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

An introductory historical survey of the documentary, from the silent era to the digital age. Topics addressed will include the origins of the concept of the documentary, direct cinema and cinema verite, propaganda, ethnographic media, the essay film, experimental documentary forms, media activism, fiction and documentary, and the role of changing technologies. Filmmakers studied will include Flaherty, Vertov, Riefenstahl, Rouch, Pennebaker, Maysles, Wiseman, Marker, Farocki, Spheeris, Hara, Riggs,Honigman, Morris, and Moore. Grades will be based on exams, essays and other research and writing projects. Open to all students, registration priority for First-Year students and film majors. Class size: 25

 

11632

FILM 109 Introduction to the Aesthetics

of Film

John Pruitt

Screening:

M . . . .

Su

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

A one-semester survey course comprising weekly screenings and lectures designed for first-year students, especially those who are considering film as a focus of their undergraduate studies. Central cinematic issues are addressed both in terms of the films viewed and the assigned theoretical readings: narrative design, montage, realism, film and dreams, collage, abstraction, and so forth. Films by Chaplin, Keaton, Renoir, Rossellini, Hitchcock, Deren, Brakhage, Bresson, Godard and others are studied. Readings of theoretical works by authors including Vertov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Munsterberg, Bazin, Brakhage, Deren and Arnheim. Midterm and final exam; term paper. Open to first-year students only. Class size: 30

 

11635

FILM 116 The History of Cinema since 1945

Richard Suchenski

Screening:

. T . Th .

. . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Designed for first year students, this course (the second part of a two-part survey) will address the history of cinema since the end of the Second World War, In addition to offering an interdisciplinary look at the development and significance of the cinema during this period, we will consider the nature and function of film form through lectures, discussions, the reading of key texts, and close study of works by exemplary directors such as Rossellini, Hitchcock, Brakhage, Bresson, Tati, Resnais, Godard, Bergman, Kurosawa, Tarkovsky, Kubrick, Fassbinder and Jia. Special focus will be paid to film's relationship to related arts and to the larger history of culture. Attendance and participation is assumed and there will be a midterm exam, two short papers, and a final examination. Class size: 25

 

11636

FILM 203 Electronic Media:

Digital Animation

Jacqueline Goss

. T . . .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

AVERY 117 / 333

PART

In this course we will make video and web-based projects using digital animation and compositing programs (Macromedia Flash and Adobe After Effects). The course is designed to help students develop a facility with these tools and to find personal animating styles that surpass the tools at hand. We will work to reveal techniques and aesthetics associated with digital animation that challenge conventions of storytelling, editing, figure/ground relationship, and portrayal of the human form. To this end, we will refer to diverse examples of animating and collage from film, music, writing, photography, and painting. Prerequisite: familiarity with a nonlinear video-editing program. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement. Class size: 12

 

11643

FILM 203 Electronic Media:

Performance & Video

Ben Coonley

. . W . .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PART

Cross-listed: Theater This course explores intersections of video and performance art. Course participants develop ways of using video's most fundamental property: its ability to reproduce a stream of real-time synchronized images and sounds. How does video technology mediate between on-screen performer and audience? How can artists interested in creating critical and self-reflexive media respond to video's immediacy and "liveness"? How can performance artists use video playback devices, displays, projectors, and interactive elements to shape and enhance live art? Course participants will work on individual projects using cameras, monitors, switchers, surveillance systems, projectors, and software-based video mixers. The first half of the course concentrates on the creation of performance "tapes" (or tape-less video documents) and the history of experimental video focused on framing staged live activities. The second half of the course concentrates on the use of video as a central component within live art events, plus a continued discussion about the larger cultural and psychological impact of live video production. Readings on and viewings of work by Nam Jun Paik, Andy Warhol, Joan Jonas, Martha Rosler, Laurie Anderson, Richard Serra, Chris Burden, John Baldessari, Bruce Nauman, Gilbert & George, George Kuchar, William Wegman, Michael Smith, Walid Raad, Wynne Greenwood, Shana Moulton, Eileen Maxson, Ryan Trecartin, Xander Marro, Miranda July, Sadie Benning, Jeremy Bailey, Paper Rad, Harry Dodge and Stanya Kahn. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement. Class size: 12

 

11604

ART 206 KL Sculpture II: Network Art

Kristin Lucas

. . . . F

10:10 am -1:10 pm

AVERY 333

PART

See Film section for description.

 

11641

FILM 207 Introduction to Video

Jacqueline Goss

. . W . .

10:10 am -1:10 pm

AVERY 117

PART

This course is designed to introduce you to various elements of video production with an emphasis on video art and experimentation. The class culminates with the completion of a single channel video piece by each student. To facilitate this final project, there will be a number of camera and editing assignments that are designed to familiarize you with digital video technology while investigating various aesthetic and theoretical concepts. Class sessions will consist of technology demonstrations, screenings, critiques and discussions. Technology training will include: cameras, Final Cut Pro, studio lighting and lighting for green screen, key effects, microphones and more. No prerequisites, permission from instructor. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement. Class size: 12

 

11647

FILM 208 Introduction to 16mm Film

Peter Hutton

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PART

An introduction to filmmaking with a strong emphasis on mastering the 16mm Bolex camera. Students will be required to shoot six different assignments designed to address basic experimental, documentary, and narrative techniques. A wide range of technical and aesthetic issues will be explored in conjunction with editing, lighting, and sound recording techniques. No prerequisites, permission from instructor. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement. Class size: 12

 

11649

FIL223 Graphic Film Workshop

Peter Hutton

. . . . F

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

AVERY 338

PART

This course explores the materials and processes available for the production of graphic film or graphic film sequences. It consists of instruction in animation, rephotography, rotoscoping, and drawing on film and of viewing and discussing a number of films that are primarily concerned with the visual. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement. Interested students should contact Prof. Hutton (hutton@bard.edu) prior to registration.

Class size: 12

 

11638

FILM 232 American Avant Garde Film,

1942-1975

John Pruitt

Screening:

. T . . .

M . . . .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

A lecture, survey course devoted to one of the most significant artistic movements in film following World War II, a movement closely tied to art forms like poetry and painting, which thus calls into critical question the medium's normal association with narrative fiction. The course will focus on a relatively small number of major filmmakers: the early pioneers of the 1940's (Deren, Peterson, Menken, and Broughton); the mythopoeic artificers of the 1950's and early 1960's (Anger, Brakhage, and Baillie); and the formalists of the late 1960's, (Frampton, Snow and Gehr). We will also pay attention to the strong graphic/collage cinema of artists like Cornell, Conner, Smith, and Breer as well as to the anarchic, comic improvisations of figures like Jacobs, Kuchar, and MacLaine. We will end in the mid 1970's by touching on the movement's then future prospects, e.g. the revitalisation of storytelling through autobiography (Mekas) and feminist/critical narrative (Rainer). Supplementary readings, including many theoretical works by the filmmakers themselves as well as material touching on parallel avant-garde movements in painting, photography, poetry, and music from the same era, works by highly influential artists like Charles Olson, John Cage, et al. Three essays. Open enrollment. Class size: 20

 

11375

SPAN/FILM 234 Buñuel, Saura, Almodóvar: Spanish Auteurs

David Rodriguez-Solas

Screenings:

. T . Th .

. . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

6:00 pm -9:00 pm

OLINLC 208

PRE 110

FLLC

Cross-listed: Film This course will consider the filmography of directors who have borne the label "auteur" as a distinction both within Spanish and transnational cinema. Students will explore how "auteristic" cinema has been used as a strategic practice for branding Spanish films, and will study stylistic features associated to each auteur. We will investigate fetishism and dream sequences in Buñuel's filmography (Un chien andalou, Los olvidados, Viridiana). Saura's metaphorical films will be analyzed as representations of the opposition to Francoism (The Hunt, Cría cuervos). We will study Almodóvar's mastering of the language of melodrama in films such as Law of Desire, All About My Mother, and Volver. Finally, we will study lesser-known Spanish auteurs such as Luis García Berlanga (The Executioner), Víctor Erice (El Sur), and Isabel Coixet (The Secret Life of Words). Requirements for this course include short papers, a final research paper, and regular attendance to screenings. Conducted in English. Class size: 18

 

11637

FILM 242 Script to Screen

Kelly Reichardt

. T . . .

10:10 am -1:10 pm

AVERY 217

PART

This is a production workshop. Concentration will be on the narrative form with a goal of developing a comprehensive methodology for transforming the text to the screen. Students will be given a script from which to work. Emphasis will be placed on blocking the actors and the use of the camera-as-narrator. Through an extended series of scenes to be shot on video students will explore the dramatic and narrative elements of film, consider motivation for both character and camera, and learn to physicalize on film what is internal or emotional in the given text. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement. Class size: 12

 

11796

FILM 250 War in Film

Ian Buruma

M . . . .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

PRE 110

AART

This class is about the representation of war in world cinema. War propaganda, as well as anti-war films, will be shown to reveal not only different political perspectives, but also different national perspectives, as well as the effects of the historical circumstances under which the films were made. We will look three major categories: patriotic films, including propaganda, protest films and film realism. Some of the greatest war films are neither satirical, nor propagandistic, but attempt to show the horror of war, without overt political messages. Films from all continents will be selected. The class will be a mixture of movie aesthetics, politics, and history. Class size: 12

 

11634

FILM 256 Writing the Film

So Yong Kim

. T . . .

10:10 am -1:10 pm

AVERY 117 / 338

PART

An introductory writing course that looks at creative approaches to writing short films and dialogue scenes. There will be writing and research exercises, screenings, discussions, readings and script critiques. The course will focus on researching and developing ideas and structure for stories, building characters, poetic strategies and writing comedic, realistic and awkward romantic dialogue. Class size: 12

 

11578

FILM 258 Asian Cinematic Modernisms

Richard Suchenski

Screening:

. . W . .

. T . . .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

7:00 pm - 11:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Cross-listed: Art History, Asian Studies This seminar will explore the various permutations of modernism in and between the cinemas of East, Central, South, and Southeast Asia by looking closely at major films and the cultural configurations from which they emerged. Special attention will be paid to the way in which strong directors from different traditions use formal innovations to mediate on the dramatic changes taking place in their societies as well as on the way in which the meaning of these strategies shift over time. We will consider the ways in which the different modernisms being discussed differ both from Western paradigms and from each other. The course is structured around special 35mm retrospectives of two figures who will serve as exemplary case studies: Indian filmmaker Ritwik Ghatak and Japanese filmmaker Kenji Mizoguchi. Class size: 14

 

11642

FILM 312 Advanced Screenwriting

So Yong Kim

. . W . .

10:10 am -1:10 pm

AVERY 338

PART

The last few years have seen a wave of narrative films structured around multiple points of view. Starting with Rashomon and ending with Syndromes and a Century, we'll study several films that use multiple protagonist structures to express complex ideas. Having analyzed these films, the second part of the course will function as a workshop. During this phase, the course will break into groups to collaboratively create multiple protagonist scripts. Preference given to students who have completed Screenwriting, but permission also be granted by instructor. You will emerge from this class having co-written a feature film script. Class size: 12

 

11645

FILM 319 Reenactment

Peggy Ahwesh

. . . Th .

10:10 am -1:10 pm

AVERY 217

AART

This course will use weekly screenings to survey the styles and meaning of reenactments, including remakes, homages, reinterpretations, sequels, conspiracy rants and reruns to pose questions about history, trauma, memory and forgetting, narrative and authenticity as they is presented in both experimental and mainstream media. Themes such as fictionalizing historical events (Kiarostami, 9-11 docudramas), repetition in experimental media (Arnold, Jacobs), performance and playacting (Ra'ad, Dougherty), memory and repression (Hitchcock) will be screened. Issues regarding gender, identity, politics, history, technology, and copyright will be addressed as raised by the work. Students are required to write weekly responses to the films and readings and produce their own video work, as the syllabus for the class will specify. Class size: 12

 

11640

FILM 344 Sound & Picture Editing

Kelly Reichardt

M . . . .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

AVERY 217 / 333

PART

This course will explore the principles and practices of sound design in motion pictures. Through analysis of existing narrative sound works and through student's own sound creations, the class will explore the mutual influence of sound and picture. Over the semester, students will have the opportunity to deeply explore the editing process and discover how sound comes into play when making a cut. In the first part of the semester, students will record and build layered tracks (ambient, foley, ADR) for sequences from existing films. In the second part of the semester, students will shoot their own footage to integrate with existing soundtracks. Students who wish to take the course should be familiar with the fundamentals of computer-based media and should be willing to share their work with others. Class size: 12

 

11646

FILM 353 Virtual Environments

Ben Coonley

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

AVERY 117 / 333

PART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities In this course students create cinematic works using digital technologies that simulate the real world and replace/enhance live production environments. Topics include: 3D modeling and animation, machinima, motion-capture, 2D to stereoscopic 3D post-conversion, and other methods for compositing real and virtual sources. Weekly readings reflect on the psychological and cultural impacts of the increasingly prevalent use of computer-generated imagery in contemporary media. We will view artworks that use and strategically misuse CGI. Students are not assumed to have any previous experience with 3D animation. Prerequisite: Previous coursework in video production or permission of the instructor. Class size: 12

 

11797

FILM 354 Curating Cinema

Ed Halter

. . . Th .

2:00 – 4:30 pm

CCS

AART

This seminar explores the history, theory and practical concerns of film curating, both in and out of the context of the art world. As a way of investigating the range of possibilities for modes of exhibition, the course will look at pre-cinematic technologies of the projected image; various models employed in the silent era; early alternatives to the Hollywood system, including cine-clubs, "small cinemas," road shows, and exploitation; later examples such as cinematheques, film festivals, and microcinemas; expanded cinema and projection performance; different attempts to introduce film and video into spaces traditionally devoted to visual art; and the role of collections and archives. Individual case studies will include the Museum of Modern Art's Film Library, Amos Vogel's Cinema 16, Anthology Film Archives, the Collective for Living Cinema, the Whitney's New American Filmmakers series and the exhibition Into the Light, and contemporary developments. Coursework will include a research and analysis paper on one example of 20th century film exhibition, a detailed technical evaluation of a screening or exhibition, and a final curatorial project. Class size: 6 CCS students, and 6 undergraduates. *All undergraduates must submit an application in advance in order to register for the course; please contact the professor for details.

 

11726

THTR 360 Going Viral: Performance,

Media, Memes

Miriam Felton-Dansky

. . . . F

10:10am - 12:30 pm

OLIN 202

AART

 

11639

FILM 405 Senior Seminar

Jacqueline Goss

. T . . .

5:00 pm -6:55 pm

AVERY 110

 

As an established component of the Film Program's requirements for all majors, the Senior Seminar is an opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among the seniors working on Senior Project. The course will have a number of film and video makers in to discuss their process and techniques, artistic life-after-Bard skills workshop, a review of distribution and grant writing opportunities and critique of works in progress. The course is an integral aspect of Senior Project for all seniors in Film. Class size: 20