11434

BIO 114 Biology: Noninfectious Disease

John Ferguson

Lab:

. . W . F

M . . . .

1:30 pm -3:30 pm

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 112

SCI

While both morbidity and mortality from infectious disease declined steadily during the 20th century in developed nations, they remained constant for noninfectious diseases. Students examine the reasons for this failure to deal more effectively with these conditions as they study various specific diseases. Examples include inherited diseases such as sickle-cell anemia, Huntington's disease, and cystic fibrosis; endocrine disorders such as acromegaly; nutrional disorders such as vitamin and mineral deficiencies; therapeutic drug addiction and toxicities; various poisonings such as plant intoxications and rattlesnake envenomation; cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarctions and cerebrovascular accidents; neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease; allergies; and autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, and diabetes mellitus. Many of the readings are relatively nontechnical case histories, but the biology underlying each condition is thoroughly developed. This course is of interest to those focusing on a career in the health professions, but is also designed to provide liberal arts students with some degree of medical literacy in these health issues. The laboratory portion introduces students to human physiology as it relates to disease. Prerequisites: experience in high school biology and chemistry. Class size: 18

 

11436

BIO 122 The Science of Creativity

Amy Savage

M . W . .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 115

SCI

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities What makes someone creative? How do we quantify creativity? Can creative skill be inherited or is it learned? Do factors such as health influence a personís creative aptitude? Is there an evolutionary advantage to being creative? What is the boundary between art & science? Can one area of inquiry provide information about the other? In this class, students will consider art, artistic expression and creativity through the lens of several core life science concepts, including genetics, inheritance, genotype vs. phenotype, gene expression, and natural selection. Finally, students will consider the relationship of the human brain and creative expression. Intended for non-majors. No specific science background is required. Class size: 18

 

11437

BIO 128 Science and Religion:

The Case of Evolution

John Ferguson /

Bruce Chilton

M . . . .

. T . . .

4:40 pm -6:00 pm

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 111

RKC 111/112

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies, Religion, Science, Technology & Society This team-taught course will examine the long-standing tension between Christian fundamentalism and scientific theories about the origin of the universe, the origin of life, and biological evolution. Wherever possible, readings will be taken from primary sources and early examples will include the Book of Genesis, Philo of Alexandria, Archbishop Ussher, Malthus, Lamarck, and Darwin. Contemporary reactions to the publication of the Origin of Species will be discussed, as well as the birth of American fundamentalism in 1911 and its influence on the controversy in America, including the Scopes trial. The ďmodern synthesisĒ of genetics and evolutionary theory will be described, along with scientific theories about the origin of life. More modern critiques of Darwinian evolution will be discussed, including the writings of Sir Fred Hoyle and the creationists. Laboratory experiences may include examinations of fossils, microbial evolution under selective pressure, homeotic mutations in Drosophila, and analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. No prior experience in biology or religion is assumed. Class size: 20

 

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11438

BIO 142 Organismal Biology

William Maple

. . W . F

10:10am - 12:10 pm

RKC 103

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies, Global & Intíl Studies An introduction to organismal biology and ecology, primarily for those who intend to continue in biology; also open to interested students not majoring in science. Topics include population genetics, evolution, vertebrate embryology and anatomy, and animal phylogeny, taxonomy, and ecology. Biology 142 may be taken before Biology 141, if necessary. Students majoring in biology are strongly encouraged to enroll in Chemistry 142 concurrently. Prerequisite: passing score on part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic.

Class size: 36

BIO 142 Lab Options: (Register separately)

 

11439

BIO 142 LBA Organismal Biology

William Maple

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 114

SCI

Class size: 18

 

11440

BIO 142 LBB Organismal Biology

William Maple

. . . . F

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 114

SCI

Class size: 18

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11441

BIO 145 Environmental Microbiology

Brooke Jude

Lab:

. T . Th .

. . . . F

8:30 am -9:50 am

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 111/112

RKC 112

SCI

This introductory level course, primarily intended for beginning biology majors, will introduce students to current research in the area of environmental microbiology, while at the same time covering such basic biological concepts as DNA, RNA, and protein production, cellular replication, metabolism, respiration, and Mendelian genetics. Topics specific to microbial life will include ecological life cycles and microbial habitats, the microbiomes of plants and humans, biodegradation and bioremediation, antibiotic resistance, biofilms and quorum sensing. There will be an introduction to the primary literature, case studies, and opportunities for in-class presentations on selected topics. A laboratory component will allow students to culture environmental microbes as well as learn techniques for identification and characterization of phenotypes. Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry.

Class size: 18

 

11442

BIO 201 Eukaryotic Genetics

Brooke Jude

M . W . .

8:30 am - 11:30 am

RKC 111/112

SCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain & Behavior; Global & Intíl Studies This course is an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance and the generation of diversity in eukaryotic organisms. This course takes a modern approach to the study of genetics in which classical ideas about genotype, phenotype and inheritance are integrated into the modern molecular and genomic understanding of the processes involved in the generation of diversity. In addition to discussions of the molecular mechanisms involved in DNA replication, recombination, the generation and repair of mutations, and the relationship between genotype and phenotype, special consideration is given to our understanding of the processes involved in generating population-level variation in complex traits and how this understanding can help us identify the myriad genetic and non-genetic factors influencing these traits. The laboratory consists of a semester long project involving the genetic manipulation of a model organismís genome to address one or more topics in the course. . This is a writing intensive course. Regular short writing assignments will be required, along with two 10-page essays (see below). We will meet for weekly hour-long writing labs. General goals are to help with the development, composition, organization, and revision of analytical and exploratory prose; the use of evidence to support an argument; strategies of interpretation and analysis of texts. Students will be responsible for their mechanics of grammar and documentation. Prerequisite: One biology course at the 140 level or higher. Class size: 18

 

11443

BIO 202 Ecology and Evolution

Bruce Robertson

. . W . .

. . . . F

8:30 am - 11:30 am

9:30 am - 11:30 am

RKC 114/115

RKC 114/115

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies This core course for biology majors is an introduction to the general principles of ecology and evolution that, with genetics, form the core of biological understanding. In addition to studying foundational ideas in both ecology and evolution, we will explore modern topics at the boundary between these two areas. We will consider, for example, how genetic variation among individual organisms can influence ecological interactions, and how these interactions can influence fitness. We will focus on a mechanistic understanding of processes, using model-building to inform that understanding. Prerequisite: One biology course at the 140 level or higher. Class size: 18

 

11444

BIO 208 Biology Seminar

Michael Tibbetts

. . . Th .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

RKC 103

 

1 credit This course will provide students with broad exposure to biology through the biology visiting speaker seminar series. Students will hear about the wide-ranging research interests of invited biologists and have opportunities to interact informally with them. The course is graded Pass/Fail and students are responsible for short follow-up assignments for at least 80% of the talks. Recommended for all biology majors and other interested students.

Class size: 60

 

11369

PSY 231 Evolutionary Psychology

Andrew Gallup

M . W . .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLIN 202

SSCI

Cross-listed: Biology; Mind, Brain & Behavior All species are a product of evolution and Homo sapiens is no exception. Nevertheless, the Darwinian revolution that transformed biology a long time ago is only now taking place for the study of humans. Virtually every human-related subject (e.g., the social sciences, the health sciences, and the humanities) can be approached from an evolutionary perspective. Even better, evolutionary theory is dissolving the traditional disciplinary boundaries, for example by making knowledge of people in relation to their ancestral environments (anthropology, archaeology) essential for understanding the nature of the human mind (psychology) or modern health (medicine). Evolution is truly a passport for the study of all things animate and their productions, therefore all things human, in addition to other organisms. Evolutionary psychology is the scientific study of human nature, based on understanding the psychological adaptations that our ancestors evolved in prehistory to cope with the challenges of survival and reproduction. This course will investigate multiple facets of human behavior and cognition from an evolutionary perspective. While developing an appreciation of the ways in which evolutionary thinking can inform the study of human psychology and behavior, students in this course will also gain experience in understanding and evaluating primary research reports. Class size: 22

 

11445

BIO 310 Prokaryotic & Viral Genetics

John Ferguson

Lab:

. T . Th

. . . Th ..

8:00 am - 10:00 am

1:30 pm -5:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 112

 

This course considers biological inheritance in prokaryotes (bacteria) and their viruses (bacteriophages). Lectures alternate with student presentations of fundamental papers in chronological order. Topics include mutagenesis and repair, plasmids, conjugation, transformation, intemperate and temperate phages, transduction, transposition and nonhomologous recombination, homologous recombination, and the regulation of gene expression. Laboratory work provides practical experience in the topics covered. Offered in alternate spring semesters. Prerequisite: BIO 201, BIO 303, and CHEM 201-202.

Class size: 18

 

11446

BIO 313 Animal Behavior

Philip Johns

†††††††††††††† Lab:

. T . Th .

. . . . F

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

8:00 am - 11:30 am

RKC 102

SCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain & Behavior The aim of this course is to examine animal behavior from a biological, and especially an evolutionary, point of view. Students will explore the causes and consequences of behaviors such as: foraging and predation; migration; anti-predator behaviors; and social behaviors such as communication; mating behavior; cooperation; and altruism. Students will be exposed to a mix of lecture and discussion of the recent primary literature. Students will lead some of the discussions. One major aim of the course is for students to become familiar with the methodology of animal behavior, and students must participate in at least one major field trip. Students will design and carry out their own animal behavior research over the course of the semester. This course is intended for advanced biology majors. Biology 201 and 202 are required; Biostatistics and Advanced Evolution are both useful to this course but not required. Please ask the instructor if you have any questions about your eligibility. Class size: 16

 

12034

BIO 316 Field Work in Animal Behavior

Philip Johns

January Intersession

 

 

SCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, & Behavior 2 credits In this course, students will learn the basic methods to study animal behavior in the field. Students will generate hypotheses on a number of animal systems, design experiments to test these hypotheses, analyze data, and present their results. Students will become familiar with a variety of tools, techniques, and analysis programs. Study organisms will range from arthropods to birds and mammals. In addition to multiple, short research projects, students will participate in ad hoc observations of animals other than their study organisms, to read and discuss primary literature, and to write reports pertaining to their studies. The bulk of this course will take place during a field excursion to the US Virgin Islands in January, although some analysis and follow-up studies will continue into the spring semester. Students who take this course are, strongly encouraged to take BIO 313 in the spring semester. Requires Biology 202 or consent of instructor. Class size: 16

 

11447

BIO 415A Advanced Seminar in Ecology: Urban Ecology

Bruce Robertson

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:30 pm

RKC 200

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies 2 credits Urban development is among the most pervasive and ubiquitous forms of land cover change. Thus, urbanization poses significant challenges to many organisms, including humans. Urban Ecology is a seminar course, where weíll focus on the processes determining patterns of abundance and distribution of organisms in urban ecosystems, the interactions among organisms in the urban environment, behavioral and evolutionary responses that facilitate adaptation to urban environments, and the interactions between humans (and societies) and nature in urban environments. Urban organisms and ecosystems also provide services (e.g. temperature mitigation, pest control) to humans and we will focus on aspects of urban planning as it relates to maximizing those services. Prerequisites: BIO 202 or consent of instructor. Class size: 12

 

11448

BIO 415 B Advanced Seminar: Ecology

of Infectious Disease

Felicia Keesing

M . . . .

1:30 pm -3:30 pm

RKC 200

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & Intíl Studies 2 credits In this course, we will begin by introducing ourselves to some of the major ideas and terms in the ecology of infectious diseases. Then we will read a range of selections from the current literature. We will cover a diversity of topics, from conservation of endangered species to the control of smallpox introductions in human populations. Class size: 12

 

11395

CHEM 441 DNA / RNA: Structure

& Function of Nucleic Acids

Swapan Jain

. T . . .

4:40 pm -6:10 pm

RKC 122

 

Cross-listed: Biology

2 credits The fundamental goals of this course are to enable the students to apply the knowledge & understanding gained in chemistry and biology classes to advanced topics of study. This seminar-style course will begin with a review of nucleic acid chemistry. The influence of DNA/RNA structure on replication, transcription and translation will be discussed. The importance of protein-nucleic acid interactions and the role of RNA in regulation (catalytic RNA, riboswitches and RNA interference pathways) will be the major topics of inquiry. Students will routinely utilize modeling/imaging software to acquire a deeper appreciation of nucleic acid structure. The course will be taught using primarily literature/materials posted on Moodle and books on library reserves desk. Prerequisites: Biochemistry (CHEM 390/BIOL 301) and permission of the instructor. Class size: 12