11329

CHI 106†† Intensive Chinese

Li-Hua Ying

M T W Th .

1:30 pm -3:30 pm

OLINLC 120

FLLC

8 creditsThis course is intended for students who have completed Beginning Chinese 101, or for those who have had the equivalent of one semesterís Beginning Chinese at another institution. We will continue to focus on both the oral and written aspects of the language. Regular work in the language lab and private drill sessions with the tutor are required. An 8-week summer immersion program in Qingdao, China will follow this course. Upon successful completion of the summer program, the students will receive six credits. (Financial aid is available for qualified students to cover part of the cost of the summer program. See Prof. Ying for details.) Class size: 15

 

11331

CHI / ASIA 205†† Representations of Tibet

Li-Hua Ying

. T . Th .

3:40 pm -5:00 pm

OLINLC 120

ELIT/DIFF

The popular image of Tibet in the West has been shaped in large measure by Christian missionaries' accounts, European explorers' travelogues, Hollywood movies, and the campaigns of the Tibetan exile community, including the many public appearances of the Dalai Lama. Emerging from these presentations is an exotic and sacred Tibet shrouded in mystery and charm, a Tibet as a site of geographic and cultural exceptionality, and a devastated land suppressed by Communist China. In China, tourism sites on the internet show beautiful pictures of snowcapped mountains and pilgrims turning prayer wheels at gilded monasteries as evidence of a pristine land and a people enjoying religious freedom and simple living. This course is designed to examine the ways in which texts and images are created and interpreted about a land with geographical, historical, cultural, and legal ambiguities. We will attempt to understand modern Tibet from multiple perspectives, primarily through reading works by three groups of writers: the early explorersí accounts such as /Trans-Himalaya: Discoveries and Adventures in Tibet/ by Sven Anders Hedin, and /My Journey to Lhasa/ /by Alexandra David-Neel; writings by Tibetans both in exile and inside Tibet including /Freedom in Exile: the Autobiography of the Dalai Lama/, and stories and poems by Tashi Dawa, Ah Lai, Yidam Tsering, and Tashi Pelden; and works by contemporary Chinese writers such as Ma Yuan, Ma Jian, and Ma Lihua. We will also look at studies of Tibetan history and religion by scholars such as Melvyn Goldstein and Donald Lopez, as well as modern art and film about Tibet. Conducted in English. This course is part of the World Literature offering.Class size: 18

 

11330

CHI 302†† Advanced Chinese II

Yen-Chen Hao

M . W . .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLINLC 208

FLLC

This course is a continuation of Chinese 301 offered in the fall. It is designed for students who have taken at least two and half years of basic Chinese at Bard or elsewhere, and who want to expand their reading and speaking capacity and to enrich their cultural experiences. Texts are mostly selected from Chinese newspapers.Class size: 15

 

11759

CHI 404†† China in Film & Literature II

Yen-Chen Hao

M . W . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLINLC 118

FLLC

Following the film course in the fall and with the same goal of enhancing speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, this course closely examines films from China, Taiwan and Hong Kong, exploring through lectures and discussions such topics as the origin of Chinese cinema, nationalism and revolution, the genre of social realism, the cinematic representation of contemporary and recreated historical themes vis-ŗ-vis portrayals offered in literary and historical sources, the search for roots in the post-Mao era, nativist film and literature, the Fifth Generation and experimental fiction and film, Hong Kong popular culture in the commercial age, feminism and sexuality, and representations of exile, diaspora and the new immigrants. Conducted in Chinese.Class size: 15

 

11354

JAPN 102†† Introductory Japanese II

Mika Endo

M T W Th .

8:50 am -9:50 am

OLINLC 210

FLLC

Cross-listed:Asian Studies†† The second part of a two-semester sequence introducing the fundamentals of the Japanese language. Students will systematically develop their abilities in the four primary skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading.Course work will consist of extensive study of basic grammar, language lab work, conversation practice, and simple composition exercises.Class size: 20

 

11360

JAPN 125 Asian Humanities Seminar

Nathan Shockey

. T . Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLIN 205

HUM

This seminar provides an introduction to a number of foundational and canonical literary, philosophical, and religious texts from China, India, and Japan. The course spans over 2000 years, from the 4th century B.C.E. to the 18th century; across this broad reach of time and space, we will explore how these works formulate conceptions of self, society, and the good life. The focus of the class is on direct engagement and close readings of these major texts. Through readings in the Asian traditions, the seminar seeks to develop students' understanding of the diversity of world thought and literature. This course is designed to fulfill the core requirement for the Asian Studies major, as well as to provide the opportunity for students in all courses of study to read and grapple with these texts that have stood the test of time for centuries. Class size: 20

 

11355

JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II

Nathan Shockey

. T W Th .

8:50 am -9:50 am

HEG 308

FLLC

Cross-listed: Asian Studies†† This course accelerates the acquisition of Chinese characters and introduces more complex grammatical patterns and expressions with the goal of refining studentsí mastery of modern Japanese. Prerequisite: Japanese 102 or equivalent.Class size: 15

 

11750

LIT 244†† Literature and Revolution in East Asia and Beyond

Nathan Shockey

M . W . .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLIN 204

FLLC

See Literature section for description.

 

11356

JAPN 302†† Advanced Japanese II

Mika Endo

M . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

OLINLC 208

FLLC

Cross-listed:Asian StudiesThis course is a continuation of Japanese 301. Students will concentrate on the four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, with a heavier emphasis on oral ability. The course continues the introduction of complex grammatical patterns while further accelerating the acquisition of Chinese characters and advanced vocabulary. Students will build oratory skills through debate on relevant social topics and through individual research presentations. Composition of advanced written material will also be emphasized. The course will be conducted in Japanese. Prerequisite: Japanese 301 or equivalent. Class size: 15

 

11573

ARTH 293†† East Meets West

Patricia Karetzky

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

PRE 110

AART

 

11578

FILM 258†† Asian Cinematic Modernisms

Richard Suchenski

†††††††††††††††††† Screening:

. . W . .

. T . . .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

7:00 pm - 11:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

 

11750

LIT 244†† Literature and Revolution in East Asia and Beyond

Nathan Shockey

M . W . .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLIN 204

FLLC

 

11503

PS 233†† International Politics of South Asia

Sanjib Baruah

. T . Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

RKC 101

SSCI

 

11361

HIST / PS 283†† Environmental Politics

in East Asia

Robert Culp / Ken Haig

. T . Th .

10:10am - 11:30am

OLIN 202

SSCI

 

11650

REL 103†† Buddhist Thought and Practice

Kristin Scheible

M . W . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLIN 204

HUM/DIFF

 

11653

REL 124†† Reading Religious Texts

Kristin Scheible

M . W . .

8:30 am -9:50 am

OLIN 202

HUM/DIFF

 

11656

REL 140†† Sanskrit

Richard Davis

. T W Th .

9:00 am - 10:00 am

OLIN 309

FLLC

 

11654

REL 338†† Religions in the Hudson Valley

Kristin Scheible

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

OLIN 304

HUM

 

11657

REL 343†† Popular Arts in Modern India

Richard Davis

M . W . .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLINLC 210

HUM