BARD COLLEGE SPRING 2013

COURSE LIST ADDENDUM

(1-8-13)

 

COURSES ADDED

 

12229

WRIT 224   Literary Reportage

Ian Buruma

M . W .  .

10:10am – 11:30am

HEG 201

ELIT

This course will introduce the students to the art of journalism. At best, journalism can rise to literary excellence. We will be studying reportage as well as criticism, looking at examples of both genres since Macaulay’s contributions to the Edinburgh Review. The question is what lifts journalism to a higher literary level. We will consider some famous examples: John Hersey on Hiroshima, Michael Herr’s dispatches on the Vietnam War, Alma Guillermoprieto on Latin American politics, Hunter S. Thompson on the party conventions, V.S. Naipaul on Trinidad. Other questions dealt with in this course include the vexed one of literary license. Reportage by Ryszard Kapuscinski and Curzio Malaparte is fine literature, to be sure. Both claimed to be writing journalism. But they clearly made things up. Can a writer have it both ways: the license of fiction, and the claim to be presenting the truth? Finally, we will read some of the best critics, including Cyril Connolly, Edmund Wilson, and Pauline Kael. Class size: 15

 

11896

MUS 241   History and Literature of

Electronic and Computer Music

David Behrman

M . . .

1:30 pm-3:50 pm

BLM N119

AART

Beginning with a brief survey of the earliest electronic instruments such as the Theremin and Ondes Martenot, this course examines the post-war development of the French School  of Musique Concrete, German Elektronische Musik and American Tape Music, among others.  Computer Music from early sound synthesis experiments at Bell Labs and elsewhere; Live Electronic Music from Cage and Tudor’s pioneering work to recent and current PC-based interactive “live” computer music; and multi-media works from ‘60’s “classics” to the present. Music studied will be drawn from the works of Varese, Schaeffer, Henry, Stockhausen, Cage, Leuning, Ussachevsky, Babbitt, Arel, Davidovsky, Boretz, Berio, Nono, Boulez, Pousseur, Xanakis, Martirano, Young, Reich, Oliveros, Subotnik, Musica Elettronica Viva (Rzewski, Curran, Teitelbaum) Takemitsu, Kosugi, Takahashi, Amacher, Sonic Arts Union (Mumma, Ashley, Lucier, Behrman) Matthews,  Risset, Tenney, Laurie Spiegel, Laurie Anderson, Brian Eno, George Lewis, Laetitia Sonami and other recent and current  developments, including the Ambient, Illbient and DJ scenes. Assignments will include extensive listenings, reading, research and analysis, as well as possible recreations of “classical” pieces from the repertoire and original compositional  and performance projects inspired by these studies. The class is a continuation/complement to Music 240 and is strongly recommended as a preparation for all electronic music studio courses. Class size: 15

 

12173

EUS 102 B Intro to Environmental Science

Gidon Eshel

M . W

10:10am-11:30am

Albee 106

SSCI

Description to follow.   Class size: 20

 

11886

BLC 107  Intensive ESL

Denise Minin

M . W Th .

. T . . .

10:00am – 12:30pm

10:00am – 12:30pm

HDR 106

HDR 101A

 

This course is designed to give incoming international students an overview of the Liberal Arts experience through exploring some of the fields of study Bard has to offer. Through this investigation, students will develop the academic and study skills needed to survive this challenging academic environment. An emphasis on reading and writing will provide opportunities for students to develop vocabulary, improve grammar and strengthen their grasp of the written language.  Class size: 14

 

11889

LIT 2159 Into the Whirlwind:  Literary Greatness and Power

Jonathan Brent

. . . . F

2:00 – 4:20 pm

OLIN 201

ELIT/DIFF

Cross-listed: Russian and Eurasian Studies   This course will examine the fate of the literary imagination in Russia from the time of the Revolution to the stagnation of the Brezhnev period.  We will look at the majestic, triumphant imaginative liberation in writers such as Isaac Babel, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Osip Mandelstam and Mikhail Bulgakov; the struggle with ideology and the Terror of the 1930s in Yuri Olesha, Anna Akhmatova, Lidia Chukovskaya, Mikhail Zoshchenko, Varlam Shalamov, Boris Pilnyak and Yuri Tynyanov; the hesitant Thaw as reflected in Boris Pasternak’s Dr. Zhivago; and the course will conclude by reading Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and  Moscow to the End of the Line, by Venedikt Erofeev. Readings of literary works will be supplemented with political and historical documents to provide a sense of the larger political-social-historical context in which they were written. After the violent, imaginative ebullience of the Revolutionary period, how did literature stay alive during the darkest period of mass repression, censorship and terror when millions of Soviet citizens were either imprisoned or shot?  What formal/aesthetic choices did these writers make in negotiating the demands of official ideology and Party discipline, on the one hand, and authentic literary expression, on the other?  What image of history and of man did these “Engineers of human souls” produce?  These are some of the questions we will ask and seek to answer.  All readings will be in English.  Class size: 20

 

11908

LIT 405 CH  Senior Colloquium: Literature

Cole Heinowitz

M . . . .

4:45pm -6:30 pm

OLIN LC 115

N/A

Literature Majors writing a project are required to enroll in the year-long Senior Colloquium.   Senior Colloquium is an integral part of the 8 credits earned for Senior Project.  An opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among students, the colloquium explicitly addresses challenges arising from research and writing on this scale, and presentation of works in progress.  A pragmatic focus on the nuts and bolts of the project will be complemented with life-after-Bard skills workshops, along with a review of internship and grant-writing opportunities in the discipline. Senior Colloquium is designed to create a productive network of association for student scholars and critics: small working groups foster intellectual community, providing individual writers with a wide range of support throughout this culminating year of undergraduate study in the major.  Class size: 25

 

12159

MATH 106   Mathematics and Politics

John Cullinan

. T . Th .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

RKC 101

MATC

This course considers applications of mathematics to political science.  Five major topics will be covered:  a model of escalatory behavior, game-theoretic models of international conflict, yes-no voting systems, political power, and social choice.  For each model presented, the implications of the model as well as the limitations of the model will be discussed.  Students will be actively involved in the modeling process.  There is no particular mathematical prerequisite for this course though we will do some algebraic computations from time to time and discuss deductive proofs of some of the main results. Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic.  Class size: 22

 

12148

MUS WKSHI   Intro to Electronic Music

Miguel Frasconi

. . W . .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

4 credits This hands-on workshop will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus primarily on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog recording techniques and devices. Topics to be covered include the physics of sound, psychoacoustics, and foundational practices in electro-acoustic sound production and their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on digital signal processing, instrument "discovery" and exploration, field recording, and modes of electronic diffusion, including multichannel installation, live performance and multimedia. Students will be given instruction in the use of digital audio workstations (DAWs), and will become familiar with sampling, multi-track recording, editing, and mixing. Throughout the semester, students will produce field recordings and other original recordings in diary format and will receive instruction and guidance in utilizing this work for electronic composition, performance and installation. Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring the aesthetic, political, historical and personal implications of music technology and its uses. Enrollment in this course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios. In addition to the digital workstations, students can also explore analog synthesis techniques using the vintage Serge modular synthesizer.  Class size: 15

 

11909

WRIT 405 EM  Senior Colloquium: Written Arts

Edie Meidav

M . . . .

4:45pm -6:30 pm

OLIN LC 118

N/A

Written Arts Majors writing a project are required to enroll in the year-long Senior Colloquium.   Senior Colloquium is an integral part of the 8 credits earned for Senior Project.  An opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among students, the colloquium explicitly addresses challenges arising from research and writing on this scale, and presentation of works in progress.  A pragmatic focus on the nuts and bolts of the project will be complemented with life-after-Bard skills workshops, along with a review of internship and grant-writing opportunities in the discipline. Senior Colloquium is designed to create a productive network of association for student scholars and writers: small working groups foster intellectual community, providing individual writers with a wide range of support throughout this culminating year of undergraduate study in the major.  Class size: 20

 

11888

PS 239   The United Nations and Model U.N.

Jonathan Becker

. . . . F

1:30pm – 2:50 pm

OLIN 107

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies , Human Rights   1 credit* This is a year-long course,  divided into two parts. The first part will explore the history of the United Nations and will introduce students to its structure and principal aims. It will also focus on the role of specialized agencies and the ways in which alliances impact on the UN’s day-to-day operations. The second part of the course will focus on an assigned country (for each Model UN, each college is assigned a country to represent. It will entail a study of the country’s history, politics and economics and will conclude with the writing of ‘position papers’ that reflect that country’s approach to issues confronting the UN. In addition, there will be a public speaking component. Students taking the course will have the opportunity to participate in a Model United Nations. Students wishing to enroll should e-mail jbecker@bard.edu with 1-2 paragraphs indicating why they would like to participate. Class size: 15

 

 

COURSES CANCELLED

 

11700

EUS 240 Advanced Readings in Environmental Science

Gidon Eshel

M . W . .

10:10am - 11:30 am

SSCI

 

11884

HUM 253 Stalin and Power

Jonathan Brent

. . . . F

2:00 – 4:20 pm

OLIN 201

HUM

 

11301

HIST 3132   History of US Urban Schooling

Ellen Lagemann

. T . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

OLIN 303

HIST

 

11705

HR 228 Reconsidering Empire

Ian Buruma

M . W . .

10:10am - 11:30 am

HEG 201

HIST

 

11315

LIT 3208 Junior Seminar: Faulkner: Race,Text, and Southern History

Donna Grover

. T . . .

. . . Th .

10:10am - 12:30pm

10:10am - 11:10am

OLIN 307

OLIN 307

ELIT

 

11694

LIT 332 Theories of Translation

Peter Filkins

. T . Th .

10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 102

FLLC

 

11497

PHIL 271   Topics in the Philosophy

of Language

Robert Martin

. . W . F

10:10am - 11:30am

HEG 300

HUM

 

 

INSTRUCTOR CHANGE

 

11583

DAN 106   Advanced Beginning Ballet

Peggy Florin

. T . Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

FISHER THORNE

PART

 

 

SCHEDULE CHANGES

 

11801

BLC 110  Grammar for Writers

Denise Minin

. T . Th .

8:30 am-9:50 am

HDR 101A

 

This class examines issues of grammar, usage, and style, with an emphasis on the difficulties encountered by non-native speakers of English. Special attention will be given to the problems created by language transfer issues and to the specific expectations of writing in different disciplines. Through frequent writing and rewriting, we will study of rules and habits that lead to clear and concise academic writing. At least 25 pages of revised writing will be expected. Class size: 14

 

11637

FILM 242 Script to Screen

Kelly Reichardt

. T . . .

10:10 am -1:10 pm

AVERY 217

PART

 

11640

FILM 344 Sound & Picture Editing

Kelly Reichardt

M . . . .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

AVERY 217 / 333

PART

 

11373

HEB 102   Elementary Hebrew II

David Nelson

M T . Th .F

8:50 am -9:50 am

OLIN 107

FLLC

 

11885

MUS WKSH HB  Performance Workshop - American Tableaux

Helena Baillie

. . . . F

1:30pm- 3:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

 

PART

 

11730

THTR 101   Acting for Non-Majors

Naomi Thornton

. . . Th .

3:45 pm – 5:45 pm

FISH

PART

 

11731

THTR 308   Advanced Scene Study

Naomi Thornton

. . . Th .

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

FISH

PART

 

11725

THTR 145   Intro to Theater & Performance: Revolutions in Time and Space

Miriam Felton-Dansky

. T . Th .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

FISH

AART

 

11752

LIT 3146   T. S. Eliot & Wallace Stevens

Matthew Mutter

. . W . .

10:10am – 12:30pm

HEG 300

ELIT

 

11453

LIT 3217   The Tragic Heroine in the Western Imagination:  From Euripides to Tennessee Williams

Daniel Mendelsohn

. . . . F

10:10 am -12:30 pm

OLIN 301

ELIT

 

11691

LIT 328 Ideology and Politics in Modern Literature

Justus Rosenberg

M . . . .

4:40pm - 7:00pm

OLIN 101

ELIT

 

11304

LIT 390   Contemporary Critical Theory

Nancy Leonard

M . . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

OLIN 310

HUM

 

11354

JAPN 102   Introductory Japanese II

Mika Endo

M T W Th .

8:50 am -9:50 am

OLINLC 210

FLLC

 

11355

JAPN 202   Intermediate Japanese II

Nathan Shockey

. T W Th .

8:50 am -9:50 am

HEG 308

FLLC

 

11841

CMSC 352   Biologically Inspired Machine Learning

Sven Anderson

. T . Th  .

10:10am-11:30am

RKC 107

MATC

 

11508

PS 243   Public Intellectuals in the

Age of the Internet

Walter Mead

. . W . F

11:50 am -1:10 pm

RKC 200

SSCI

 

11795

WRIT 330 Blown Deadlines: A Course

in Journalistic Writing

Wyatt Mason

M . . . .

7:00 pm -9:20 pm

Arendt Center

PART

 

Lab added:

11446

BIO 313   Animal Behavior

Philip Johns

                         LAB:

. T . Th .

. . . . F

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

8:00 am – 11:30 am

RKC 102

RKC 112

SCI

 

 

Additional cross-listings:

 

11707

HR 244  Reproductive Health and Human Rights

Helen Epstein

. T . Th .

1:30pm - 2:50 pm

RKC 115

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Gender & Sexuality Studies, Social Policy

 

11657

REL 343   Popular Arts in Modern India

Richard Davis

M . W . .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLINLC 210

HUM

Cross-listed:  Art History

 

 

Distribution corrections:

 

Course does not satisfy distributional area:

11372

PSY SOC   Social Psychology: Advanced  Methodology

Kristin Lane

. T . . .

1:30 pm -3:30 pm

PRE

N/A

 

11527

MUS 122   Introduction to Music Theory

Blair McMillen

. T . . .

. . . Th .

4:40 pm -6:40 pm

11:50 am -1:10 pm

BLM N217

PART

 

11368

LIT 2194   Berlin: A Pathway to

Understanding Contemporary Europe

Thomas Wild

                Screenings:

. T . Th .

M . . . .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

7:00 pm -10:00 pm

OLIN 203

PRE 110

ELIT

 

11360

JAPN 125   Asian Humanities Seminar

Nathan Shockey

. T . Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLIN 205

HUM

 

11432

SCI 162   Cosmology

Peter Skiff

. T . Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

HEG 102

N/A

This course can be taken for divisional credit in science, but does not meet the requirement for computational or laboratory experience.

 

11477

HIST 282   The Civil War & Reconstruction

Myra Armstead

. T . Th .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLIN 202

HIST/DIFF

 

11504

PS / PHIL 167   Foundations of the Law

Roger Berkowitz

M . W . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

ASP 302

HUM