12377

THTR 101   Introduction to Acting

Lynn Hawley

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

FISHER PAC

PART

3 credits  This course, intended for prospective theater majors, focuses on accessing the beginning actor’s imagination and creative energy.  Using theater games, movement work, and improvisational techniques, the intent is to expand the boundaries of accepted logic and to encourage risk-taking in the actor.  Course work includes intensive classroom sessions, individual projects designed to promote self-discovery, and group projects focused on the process of collaborative work.  Class size: 18

 

12386

THTR 101   Introduction to Acting

Naomi Thornton

. . . Th .

3:45 -5:45 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

2 credits    Scene preparation and beginning scene technique.  Emphasis on relaxation, breathing, and concentration.  Teaching the actor to make choices and implement them using sense memory and to integrate this work with the text.  Group and individual exercises and improvisations. Continuous work on the acting instrument stressing freedom, spontaneity, and individual attention. Materials: poems, monologues, stories, and scenes.  Reading of American plays, 1930 to present.  Class size: 14 (+ wait list)

 

12380

THTR 103   Acting Company

Jonathan Rosenberg

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

3 credits Corresponding with Directing Seminar, actors work with student directors on scene work for in-class presentation. Open to first year students.

Class size: 15

 

12382

THTR 131   Voice for Majors

Elizabeth Smith

. T . . F

10:10 - 11:30 am

FISHER PAC

PART

2 credits This course is designed to develop an awareness of the importance of physical relaxation, breath capacity and control, resonance and placement. There will also be an emphasis on clarity of articulation and the use of vocal range and inflection. This course is intended for moderated and prospective theater majors. Class size: 12

 

12396

THTR 141 A  Alexander Technique I

Judith Muir

. . . . F

2:30 -3:50 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

1 credit. The Alexander Technique is a powerful method of touch, which is able to ease tensions and bring comfort with an almost miraculous immediacy. It enhances our natural co-ordination and develops within us an increased awareness of self and body usage. This allows us to see choices and possibilities previously hidden and act accordingly.Through simple everyday movements of standing, sitting, walking, we can examine and identify the levels of effort that accompany these actions so that we can change inefficient movement patterns, restoring our natural co-ordination. These principles are easily applied to any activity and have a beneficial effect on the quality of our life. Class size: 15

 

12397

THTR 141 B  Alexander Technique I

Judith Muir

. . . . F

4:00 -5:20 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

See above.  Class size: 15

 

12578

THTR 207A   Playwriting

Chiori Miyagawa

. T . . .

1:30 – 4:30 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

4 credits   An introductory course that focuses on discovering the writer’s voice. Through writing exercises based on dreams, visual images, poetry, social issues, found text, and music, each writer is encouraged to find his or her unique language, style, and vision.  A group project will explore the nature of collaborative works.  Students learn elements of playwriting through writing a one-act play, reading assignments, and class discussions.  (No writing sample required.)    Class size: 15

 

12392

THTR 207 B  Playwriting I

Jorge Cortinas

. . W . .

6:20 – 9:20 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

4 credits   See above.   Class size: 15

 

12387

THTR 208   Playwriting II

Jorge Cortinas

. . . Th .

10:10 – 1:10 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

4 credits   This course will function as a writer’s workshop. Students focus on developing a full-length play, with sections of the work-in-progress presented in class for discussions.  Students grow as playwrights by developing characters and themes that are sustained through a full-length play.  The students will also read a wide range of dramatic literature and be exposed to diverse styles of playwriting. Prerequisite: Playwriting I or Theatrical Adaptations.  Registration is by invitation of the instructor.  Contact Prof. Cortinas (jcortina@bard.edu) prior to registration. This course can be repeated for credit.  Class size: 12

 

12381

THTR 209   Scene Study

Jonathan Rosenberg

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

3 credits   A course intended for students who have taken one semester of Intro to Acting and would like to continue their study. The course deals with movement from a games oriented curriculum into work with theatrical texts and discovery of the processes of scene study.  Class size: 18

 

12384

THTR 210   History of Theater II

Jean Wagner

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 309

AART

4 credits   This course is a survey of theater, drama and performance from a  global perspective, from the eighteenth to twenty-first centuries.  We  will begin with 18th century Sentimentalism and the relationship  between theater and the emergence of print culture; then continue with  an examination of Romanticism and other forms of theater as they  relate to nationalism and imperialism in Germany, France and Russia.   We will then explore the relationship between theater and popular entertainment in nineteenth and twentieth century Europe, the United States and Japan, followed by the historical avant-garde and theatrical innovation in Latin America, Eastern Europe and Asia in the twentieth century. We will end with an intercultural study of the relationship between theater and revolution.  The course will emphasize the role of performance as a cultural and political force in society, examine how developments in human communication shaped those in theater, and introduce methodologies employed by today’s theater historians.  Class size: 18

 

12391

THTR 212   Writing Political Theater

Chiori Miyagawa

. . W . .

1:30 – 4:30 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

Cross-listed:  Human Rights, Written Arts  This course will explore political expressions in the genre of plays. Throughout history, theater has played important role in political life of various cultures.  It is a unique medium, which communicates political message through creative tools to live audiences, something that other forms of writing or speeches do not achieve.  The students will read political plays by world renowned authors and contemporary writers and write several short plays and one longer play (30 min) on issues of their political interest.  This is a writing workshop.  No previous experience necessary, but you must be interested in theater. Email Prof. Miyagawa at Miyagawa@bard.edu a brief paragraph of interest in order to register in the course. This course can be repeated for credit.  Class size: 12

 

12393

THTR 215   Physical Comedy

James Calder

. . . . F

9:30 - 12:30 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

2 credits  Beginning with exercises in broad physicality, balance, rhythm, discovery, physical mask and surprise, this class explores what about the individual student  is unique and funny. When we begin to forget what is an appropriate response, and imagine what we would be like if we were never socialized, we begin to discover “the clown” that lives in each of us. By embracing the archetypes of childhood and reclaiming the “internal response” without the diminishing filter of socialization, we start to lose the inhibitions that block us from being purely expressive. This class encourages openness, invention, playfulness, generosity, sensitivity, and courage.  Prerequisite:  Introduction to Acting.  Class size: 15

 

12389

THTR 238   Dramaturgy

Jean Wagner

. . W . F

11:50 -1:10 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of this essential discipline and the many ways that it is practiced.  We will begin by examining models of dramatic structure, the fundamental building blocks of dramatic literature and how analyzing a play’s structure is useful to directors, playwrights and actors.  We will consider models of dramatic structure from Aristotle to Shakespeare, neoclassicism and the well-made play, to post-dramatic theater.  Secondly, through in-depth analysis and theoretical and historical readings, we will examine how the role of dramaturgy has evolved in historical practice.  Finally, we will explore the process of developing a coherent point of view through weekly scene-work and collaborative projects in which  playwrights, actors, directors and dramaturgs develop and present new works.  There will be two analytical papers, and weekly essays will  accompany performance projects. Pre-requisite: One Semester of Theater History, or permission from the Professor. Class size: 15

 

12390

THTR 245   Speaking Shakespeare

Elizabeth Smith

. T . . .

3:00 -5:00 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

2 credits  This course is intended for theater majors who wish to explore Shakespeare’s words as actors and are interested in developing their voices to express his complex thoughts and images. We shall concentrate on investigating soliloquies and sonnets with a view to bringing his language to life.
By approval of the Professor.  Class size: 12

 

12379

THTR 303   Directing Seminar

Jonathan Rosenberg

. T . . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

4 credits This is a studio course that covers the practice of directing from text analysis, ‘table work’, imagining the world of the play, design, casting, space, rehearsal and blocking in different configurations. The work will proceed from scenes to a full-length work. By permission of the instructor.

Class size: 15

 

12395

THTR 307   Advanced Acting

James Calder

. . . . F

1:00 -4:00 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

3 credits This is a studio acting class where students will explore scenes from challenging plays of varied styles. Extensive rehearsal time outside of class is required. Pre-requisites: for acting majors: Intro to Acting and Scene Study. For all others: Intro to Acting.  Class size: 15

 

12388

THTR 308   Advanced Scene Study

Naomi Thornton

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:30 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

3 credits    Scene Technique with work on specific rehearsal tasks and practice of their application. Continued work on the acting instrument, understanding the actor as artist and deepening the physical, emotional, intellectual connection and availability of each actor. Advanced individual exercises, scenes, and monologues from all dramatic literature. Intended for Upper College students, others by permission. Repeatable for credit.  Prerequisite: Introduction to Acting.  Class size: 12

 

12193

THTR 310 A  Survey of Drama: The Birth of Tragedy and The Death of Tragedy

Thomas Bartscherer

. . W . .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

FISHER PAC

AART

Cross-listed: Classical Studies, Literature  Two pivotal works in the history of the interpretation of tragic drama—The Birth of Tragedy by Friedrich Nietzsche and The Death of Tragedy by George Steiner—will set the agenda for our inquiry into the origins of western theater in the dramas of classical antiquity and the fate of tragedy as an art form in the modern world. In addition to assiduous study of Nietzsche and Steiner, we shall be reading a broad selection of the tragedies these authors discuss, including plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Shakespeare, Racine, Büchner, and Beckett. We shall also watch film adaptations of selected tragedies and, schedule permitting, attend a staged performance. The course will integrate close reading, literary and philosophical analysis, and practical scene work. All readings will be in English.  Class size: 15

 

12385

THTR 310 B  Survey Drama: Dangerous Theater

JoAnne Akalaitis

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER PAC

AART

"Dangerous, 1.HAZARDOUS, PERILOUS 2.able to inflict injury." What is the difference between dangerous and frightening, disturbing, provocative or violent? It may be that no matter how violent or thought-provoking theater is, in the end it is merely high or low entertainment. In this course we will examine what dangerous theater could mean. Could it have any relationship to Artaud’sTheatre of Cruelty? Certain works will be examined, including Euripides’ The Bacchae (Is Greek tragedy dangerous? What is tragedy?); Seneca (the great predecessor to Jacobean Drama) and his play Thyestes; Racine's Britannicus; and John Ford's Tis Pity She's a Whore. Other works being considered: plays by Caryl Churchill, Sarah Kane's Blasted, Edmond Bond's Saved, Harold Pinter's The Birthday Party or The Homecoming, Samuel Beckett's Endgame, Jean Genet's The Screens and The Maids, and the works of August Strindberg, Franz XaverKroetz and Reza Abdoh. Is theater ever dangerous? I have no clear opinion what Dangerous Theater is, but would hope to examine it with you. Students will be required to create their own "dangerous" pieces, perform in scenes from the works read, write papers, and present reports.

12378

THTR 318   Visual Imagination of the

Modern Stage

Daniel Fish / Kaye Voyce

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

4 credits   A course taught by leading designers and directors in the field. It examines the explosive prominence of visionary visual ideas on the stage in the past 30 years, the emergence of a new form of collaboration between directors and designers and the inclusion of the new media on the stage. This course is required for upper-college theater students.  

Class size: 15