Please Note: There is a $150.00 College Fee each semester for any student taking one or more studio art classes and/or seminars. If a student decides to drop a studio arts class/seminar they must fill out a Drop/Add form, have it signed by the appropriate department faculty and deliver it to the Office of the Registrar on or before Wednesday, February 15, 2012 by 5 PM or they will be responsible for the $150.00 College Fee.

 

12085

ART 100 HT  Cybergraphics I

Hap Tivey

. T . . .

6:30 -9:30 pm

HDR 106

PART

An introduction to graphic creation using the computer as a compositional tool; basic computer skills are required and minimal ability in Photoshop or a comparable application is recommended.  The imaging potential of a variety of graphic applications will be discussed and demonstrated during the first half of the class.  The second half will focus on individual projects with an emphasis on printing.  Print Lab will be open Fridays, 1:00-4:00 pm.

Class size: 12

 

12416

ART 101 KB  Painting I: Colorama

Ken Buhler

. . . Th .

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER

PART

The investigation of the exquisite potential of color is the focus of this class.  Color influences all aspects of our experience-perceptual, emotional, psychological, physiological, even spiritual.  Students will gain experience learning to see, understand, and utilize all the possibilities of color.  The goal is to develop a working knowledge of color as it may be applied to any visual medium.  The nature of assignments will range from vigorous color studies to train the eye, to forms of expression more personal and expressive in nature.                Class size: 14

 

12410

ART 101 LS  Painting I

Lisa Sigal

. . W . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER 140

PART

This class will be concerned foremost with "seeing" in every sense.  We will be painting  outdoors in the tradition of the Hudson School Painters, looking at many different types of landscapes from the bucolic to the industrial. In addition we will use our mobile easels to explore interior spaces of local institutions and odd places on campus. We will learn how to translate  appearances of light, atmosphere and color.   We will learn how to manipulate the physical space of the painting's surface and the underlying sensations, emotions and thoughts that go beyond simple visual translation.    Class size: 14

 

12417

ART 101 LS2  Painting I

Lisa Sanditz

. . . Th .

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER

PART

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the materiality and techniques of painting.  Projects include working from life, location, figure, collage and imagination. Classroom time consists of demonstrations, studio work, slide lectures and group critiques.  Students will learn about the formal elements of painting such as color, form, gesture and composition, while also exploring their own individual style. Discussion of traditional, modern and contemporary painting will be encouraged. Materials will cost $200-$300 for the course. Class size: 14

 

12414

ART 106 AG  Sculpture I: The Chair

Arthur Gibbons

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 138

PART

The chair is ever present.  It describes the human form and spirit. In this sculpture studio we will focus on the chair not only as a functional object but also as a sculptural thing. Basic skills in drawing, digital photography, clay modeling, plaster casting, wood carving/construction and metalworking will be taught and employed in the making of objects/things that could be chairs. Class size: 14

 

12404

ART 106 JS  Sculpture I

Julianne Swartz

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 138

PART

The definition of sculpture is always expanding to absorb new materials, media and strategies. It can include objects, actions, time-based media, sound and light. This course will introduce the language of contemporary sculpture through building objects and installations, looking at slides and videos, drawing, writing, verbal critique and discussion. We will explore how meaning is communicated through sculpture, using a variety of materials such as wood, fabric, clay, metal, and found objects. Technical demonstrations will include woodworking, welding and mold making.  Studies will also engage light, sound, space and time. Art history and contemporary theory will inform our discussion. The course is designed to develop fundamental art making skills as well as the ability to interpret visual art. Class size: 14

 

12419

ART 106 KF  Sculpture I: Drawing in Space

Kenji Fujita

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 138

PART

"Sculpture 1: Drawing in Space" is an introductory studio course in which students will investigate the relation between drawing and sculpture by developing a studio practice that treats drawing as a set of ideas and activities that can be used to make three-dimensional art. Particular emphasis will be placed on direct and improvisational ways of working. Using a range of approaches and techniques, students will explore the different ways that simple materials can be used to make sculpture, from constructing and sewing to casting and welding. Students will also be working with materials from a variety of other sources: the art supply store, the building materials center and the 99-cent shop. Class time will consist of in-class studio work which will include demonstrations in mold making, light carpentry and welding. Group critiques will be supplemented by presentations of relevant contemporary art and readings.  Class size: 14

 

12411

ART 107 KB  Basic Drawing I

Ken Buhler

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 140

PART

Drawing is considered the most basic form of visual expression and the acquisition of drawing skills essential to all art disciplines.  The goals of this course include developing the ability to compose the basic elements of line, shape, and value into representations of form and space.  There will be a focus on developing fluency and confidence in the realization of visual ideas.   The work in this class will be primarily based on observation - model, interior, still life, and geometric forms – and there will be projects that draw upon the rich history of this art form. This course is structured to give the student an appreciation and understanding of the elements of drawing while challenging them to develop a respect for careful looking and thinking.  Students will be evaluated on their effort, productivity, and development. Work outside of class will be assigned on a weekly basis. Class size: 14

 

12409

ART 107 LB  Basic Drawing I

Laura Battle

. . W . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER 149

PART

This class is about hard looking as a way to link the hand and mind to things in the real world.  We will exclusively work from life, (primarily from still life, the figure and landscape as subjects), to train the eye to look freshly at shape, form, light and space. Once some level of accomplishment is achieved, we will talk about what it is to transform what is seen.  We will work mostly in charcoal and ink, though other materials may be explored as we progress.  Class size: 14

 

12418

ART 107 LB2  Basic Drawing I

Laura Battle

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 149

PART

See  above.  Class size: 14

 

12403

ART 107 LS  Basic Drawing I

Lisa Sigal

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 149

PART

This class will explore drawing in many different ways with a range of materials throughout the semester.  Our experiences in class will primarily have to do with visual perception.  By examining these experiences and talking about them, we will attempt to transform them into homework assignments that arise out of our thoughts and ideas. We will learn to see and think using drawing by tipping back and forth between the senses and ideas. Class size: 14

 

12420

ART 109 LO  Printmaking I: Introduction to Intaglio

Lothar Osterburg

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 139

PART

This class gives an in depth introduction to all basic as well as some advanced processes of intaglio, from drypoint to etching and aquatint to wiping and printing. We will also look at classic and contemporary use of intaglio by artists. Students will apply the learned skills on projects of their own choosing.  Basic knowledge of visual language and drawing skills are required. Students must have had at least one prior art class at Bard, or show a portfolio prior to registration. Priority will be given to art majors. Expected material cost for this class is at least $100.  Class size: 14

 

12398

ART 109 NL  Printmaking I

Nicola Lopez

M . . . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER 138

PART

This class is designed to introduce students to the widely varied possibilities that are presented by the medium of printmaking.  Through hands-on studio assignments, student will learn the techniques involved in Intaglio (etching), Relief (woodcut) and Monoprint.  Although the primary focus of the class will be on learning technical skills, we will also discuss issues of formal composition, choice of imagery and thematic content through conversations and critiques in class and through presentations made by both students and the professor.  Class size: 12

 

12408

ART 200 HT  Cybergraphics II:

The Graphic Novel

Hap Tivey

. . W . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER 138

PART

This class will address the theory, tools and techniques employed in the digital creation of graphic/text artwork. The class will focus primarily on printed images, alone, and in sequence with the graphic novel as a principal arena of expression.  The class will explore theories of how realism, iconography, and cartoon illustration intersect text as an art form. Using computer software and digital printers we will examine various approaches to creating image/text combinations in the traditions of graphic novels, manga, and contemporary painting.  The most important software will be Photoshop and students must have a basic understanding of that package.   Software instruction will include more complex strategies in Photoshop as well as introductions to Illustrator, Manga Studio, and Zax Animator.  Class size: 12

 

12400

ART 201 JS  Painting II

Joseph Santore

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 140

PART

A continuation of  Painting I, this course is designed for students who are serious about painting,  especially painting from life.  Students will be working with still lifes but the focus of the class will be on the figure, on color relations and how the sensation of color interacting across the plane can create light and   space. The issues discussed in Painting I, mainly the language of color, value, temperature, contrast, saturation, intensity, etc. and strong structural relationships, will serve as building blocks for complex figurative compositions.  We will be also working from reproductions as we study some of the great figurative masters.  Students will be expected to be on time and have the proper equipment. This includes a good assortment of brushes, a proper palette and the required colors. Students will be working on gessoed paper over the first weeks but should know how to stretch and prime a canvas properly.  Some of the poses will extend over two weeks, which will allow students to begin to push their work into new places.  This class is for students who want to work hard and extend themselves.  Students should have experience in drawing and must have had Painting I, there will be no exceptions.

Class size: 12

 

12406

ART 201 LS  Painting II: Painting Loci

Lisa Sanditz

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 140

PART

This course will explore the idea of place, from the personal, to the local, the contemporary, and the art-historical. We will employ disparate methods, including plein air, site-specific, diaoramas, mapping, and a collaborative panoramic painting, all while improving formal painting skills. Prior painting experience required. Materials cost will be $200-$300.   Class size: 14

 

12401

ART 206 DD  Sculpture II: Extreme Process

Daniella Dooling

. T . . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER 138

PART

This course will focus on how an artist’s process and the qualities inherent in specific materials combine to create works of art.  Through a series of projects, we will investigate, among other things, the history of Dada, the Duchampian readymade, installation art, and the Process art movement of the late 60s in relationship to contemporary art practice. In addition, we will explore notions of collecting and archiving, communal and recycled materials, collaborative installation, and performance as process.  As part of the course, each student will prepare and present a “teach-in” for the rest of the class. Prerequisite: Sculpture I.   Class size: 12

 

12399

ART 207 DD  Drawing II: Drawing as Process

Daniella Dooling

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 149

PART

While building on the techniques and methods learned in Drawing I, Drawing as Process will also investigate concepts and methods of process.  Inherent in this investigation are a variety of traditional and non-traditional uses of materials and techniques. Through a series of weekly projects, we will study, among other things, the Process Art movement of the late 60s in relationship to contemporary art practice.  As the semester progresses, we will explore process through duration, repetition, performance, and the body as a means of production. In addition to regular drawing materials, students should expect to purchase a variety of good quality paper as needed throughout the semester.  Prerequisite: Drawing I.  Class size: 12

 

12413

ART 207 KF  Drawing II: Collage

Kenji Fujita

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 149

PART

“Drawing 2:  Collage” is an intermediate level studio arts course that will introduce students to collage using a hands-on approach that emphasizes direct and improvisational processes.  First we will work in a number of mediums, using different techniques and strategies for each one. Then we will take one idea and explore it more fully by working in a larger scale or a more sculptural space.  Time-based strategies such as stop motion animation will also be explored. Throughout this course students will be looking at Cubism, Surrealism, Dada and Appropriation Art as well as street art and other forms of public work.  These historical markers will serve as references for work done in class.  Class time will be spent working on projects and critiquing finished work supplemented by in-class demonstrations, presentations and readings. Open to qualified students by permission of the instructor. Class size: 14

 

12402

ART 209 NL  Printmaking II: Woodcut

Nicola Lopez

. T . . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER

PART

This course will introduce students to a variety of different relief printmaking techniques, focusing primarily on woodcut.  Through a series of hands-on projects, you will build your technical skills in the medium and explore ways of expanding on the ‘basic’ print by using multiple blocks, large block and modular prints, as well as discussing the use of alternative printing materials.  You will be expected to bring your own artistic goals and vision to each project and to use each assignment as an opportunity to challenge yourself conceptually and visually as well as technically.  Prerequisite: Printmaking I or permission of instructor.  Class size: 12

 

12405

ART 301 LB  Painting III: Horror Vaccui

Laura Battle

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

UBS

PART

As we inaugurate the newly renovated space in Red Hook next to the UBS Facility, we have the opportunity to consider an empty room as subject, muse, and context for work made therein. This course is intended for both sculptors and painters, asking of each to be open to the possibility of working in response to each other, and as collaborators in defining a particular place, empty at the start and gradually becoming full.  Students will be expected to work with great independence, defining projects in consultation with the instructor. This course is intended for moderated studio art majors and students who have completed a second level studio art course.  By permission of instructor. Class size: 12

 

12415

ART 305 JP  Sculpture III

Judy Pfaff

. . . Th .

10:10 -6:00

FISHER

PART

This is an all day class that will include some trips to New York City to visit museums, galleries and artist’s studios.  To see, evaluate, critique and create a dialog between your studio and the contemporary art world.  Class size: 12

 

12412

ART 307 MM  Advanced Drawing:

Drawn and Quartered

Medrie MacPhee

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISHER 142

PART

This course is designed to explore the multifaceted nature of drawing, examining through practice the formal, conceptual, expressive and narrative potential of the medium.  The course will take the students through a broad range of what might constitute a drawing through a series of projects.  Through the projects, a diversity of options will be explored in terms of media uses, image versus abstraction, a single drawing versus a series, large versus small, color versus black and white etc. Imagination and experimentation will be encouraged as well as a deepening understanding of how these different drawing options affect the meaning of what is being looked at. Class discussions and critiques will focus on the transformation of the creative impulse into concept and concept into visual realization. The goal is to gain an ability for independent and self-directed work by the end of the semester. Students should have taken Drawing and/or Painting 2, but will be admitted on a case-by-case basis. Class size: 12

 

12421

ART 310 LO  Printmaking III: Photogravure

Lothar Osterburg

. . . . F

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER 139

PART

This class will give an introduction to the 19th century process of the copperplate photogravure. Photogravure is a truly continuous tone photographic intaglio process with a rich tonal range. Etched into a copper plate, printed as an etching, photogravure bridges the gap between photography and printmaking.  As with any other technically complex process it can be expected that not all results are acceptable. Students will learn subtle retouching and bold reworking techniques to achieve a satisfactory end result, and will be introduced to the historic significance and contemporary application of this process. On several occasions this class will collaborate with Laurie Dahlberg’s “ARTH/PHOT 212 The Handmaiden’s Tale: Photography and Fine Art” during which other related alternative photographic processes will be introduced. This will be a demanding class in material, expenses and time dedication. This is a 5 to 6 hour class no matter what the course book says. Potluck lunch is planned every week. Expect to spend between $300,- and $400.- in material. Prerequisites: PERMISSION BY INSTRUCTOR ONLY! E-mail Prof. Osterburg ahead of the registration period at osterbur@bard.edu  Class size: 14

 

12407

ART 405   Senior Seminar

Ken Buhler

. T . . .

5:00 -7:00 pm

FISHER 165

 

Senior Seminar is a component of the senior project and is an integral part of the 8 credits earned for Senior Project.  The Seminar will focus on Studio Arts faculty and visiting artists presenting their life and work.  Exhibitions in the fall semester will draw students out of their studios well before the presentation of their senior show.  Visits from alumni and the Director of Career Development, will provide a glimpse into the future.  The Senior Project Exhibition is the culmination of the Senior year and is evaluated before a faculty review board and a Senior Seminar critique.  Readings and a writing workshop will be assigned and scheduled.  *Any student registered in Studio Art Senior Project or any student of another discipline who has been granted studio space in either the Fisher Studio Art Center or the U.B.S. Exhibition Center in Red Hook will be required to register and participate in all aspects of Senior Seminar.  Class size: 20