By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case.  In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project. 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

 

College & Community Ensembles

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble, one or two credits may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered. See end of Music section for instructions on registering for lessons.

 

12457

MUS 104   Bard College Orchestra

Teresa Cheung

M . . . .

7:30 - 10:00 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. Auditions will be held on. * (Please be prepared to play two pieces—one slower and lyrical, and one faster.)

Class size: 30

 

12456

MUS 105   Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30 - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

1 credit.  First rehearsal will be on Tuesday, February 14, 2012. Class size: 35

 

12636

MUS 106   Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia Renart

TBA

TBA

TBA

PART

2 credits.   Class size: 20

 

12637

MUS 108B   Ensemble: Contemporary

Blair McMillen

TBA

TBA

TBA

PART

Class size: 20

 

12446

MUS 108D   Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:40 -6:40 pm

BLM HALL

PART

Class size: 30

 

12438

MUS 108F   Ensemble:Jazz

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

12594

MUS 108G   Ensemble: Chamber/Cello

Garfield Moore

. . . . F

5:00 -7:00 pm

BLM

PART

Class size: 10

 

12641

MUS 108H  Ensemble: Gamelan

Mercedes Dujunco

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

OLIN 305

PART

Class size: 22

 

12449

MUS 108I   Ensemble: Electro-Acoustic

Marina Rosenfeld

. T . . .

4:40 -6:40 pm

BDH

PART

Class size: 16

 

12436

MUS 108J   Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

12439

MUS 108N   Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:40 -6:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composer’s works, ranging from sextet to big band.  This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music.  There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester.  Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed.  Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer.  Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting.  Class size: 10

 

MUSIC COURSES

12432

MUS 122   Introduction to Music Theory

Blair McMillen

. T . . .

. . . Th .

4:40 -6:40 pm

11:50 -1:10 pm

BLM N217

BLM N211

AART

This course will serve as an introduction to reading, studying, and analyzing tonal music. Introduction to Music Theory is geared toward non-music majors as well as potential music majors who have had little or no exposure to reading music. We will begin with the basics of musical notation, progressing to the identification of scales, triads, and seventh chords.  Class size: 20

 

12424

MUS 123   Popular Music of the

Non-Western World

Mercedes Dujunco

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies  What does it mean for a music to be “popular” and how does it become that way? In different parts of the world, the production, consumption, and distribution of popular music are shaped by a society’s distinct encounter with and cultural-specific ways of negotiating modernity.  They have to do with mediations of identity, space, and place that result in local scenes, global trends, musical hybridity, and cross-pollination.  This course will look at various popular music genres in different geographical regions, particularly Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, and explore issues related to the emergence of each one and their localized meanings.  Through discussions based on a combination of selected readings, films/videos, and music recordings, students will not only get acquainted with popular musics well beyond their own or what they normally listen to; they will also gain insights regarding the processes in which these came about, as well as alternative perspectives on what constitutes “popular music” in various non-Western contexts and their significance.  This course does not fulfill a music history elective for music majors. Class size: 20

 

12425

MUS 169   Origin of the String Quartets: Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert

Marka Gustavsson

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

In this class we will listen to the innovative work of Haydn as he developed, and defined the Classical features of the string quartet genre. We will explore his influence on Mozart, who synthesized the European strands of common tonal practice into many perfect, operatically expressive examples. Haydn’s most famous student, Beethoven, then expanded the formal and expressive boundaries and, together with Schubert, built the foundation of German Romanticism, which found a specific and highly personal outlet in the string quartet. The class will focus on listening; we will read composers’ letters, articles from current publications, as well as Christopher Gibbs’ biography of Schubert. Writing requirements will include two five-page papers, a final project, and a short concert review. Knowledge of notation is not required. Class size: 18

 

12433

MUS 172   Jazz Harmony II

John Esposito

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

Part II - This course will include acquisition of the basic skills that make up the Foundation of all jazz styles.  We will also study the Jazz Language from the BEBOP ERA up to the 60’s. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.  Class size: 20

 

12430

MUS 183   High/Low: Tensions & Agreements

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

As far back as the early Renaissance, distinctions were made as to what constituted popular and serious music.  In the 15th century some of those distinctions were defined by the music’s relationship to the church.  Later, in the 18th and 19th centuries, idiomatic folk music began to be deliberately used in opera and symphonic repertoire to evoke elements of nationalism and “local color.”  In the 20 and 21st centuries, characteristics of jazz, folk, and rock music intermingled, and now some earlier distinctions between popular and serious music are being blurred.  In this course, key works in Western classical music from the 16th through the 21st centuries will be studied along with the popular music of the day (when available).  Careful attention will be paid to critical reaction to these works, along with an examination of the cultural climate and trends that might have contributed to high/low distinctions.  Works to be studied will include: Josquin, Missa L’homme arme, Handel, Messiah, Haydn, Symphony No. 104, excerpts from Berlioz’s Les Troyens, Ravel, L’enfant et le sortilege, and excerpts from Philip Glass’s Einstein on the Beach, and John Adam’s Nixon in China.  Music of Louis Armstrong, George Gershwin, Miles Davis, The Velvet Underground, The Beatles, and Sonic Youth, among others, will be examined.  Evaluation will be based on two exams, four short papers, and a term paper.  This course counts toward music history credit.  Class size: 20

 

12428

MUS 202   Music Theory II

John Halle / Erika Switzer

M . W . F

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm*

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N217

BDH

PART

Continuation of Music Theory I, introduction to harmony, various seventh chords, secondary dominants, basics of modulation, four-part writing and voice-leading.  End result: ability to write a hymn, song or brief movement of tonal music.  Theoretical work will be complemented by weekly ear-training labs focused on developing the ability to sing and recognize secondary dominants, modulations, and so on. Prerequisite: Music Theory I or equivalent (knowledge of scales and keys).  This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.  +Note: course will meet 4 days weekly, to be determined. Two days cover theory, 2 days of lab.)  Class size: 20

 

12422

MUS 211   Jazz in Literature I

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies  This course presents some of the short stories and poems by Rudolph Fisher, Langston Hughes, Ann Petry, and Julio Cortazar. The text used in this section is ‘Hot and Cool’ by Marcela Briton and the ‘Harlem Renaissance Reader’, edited by David Lewis.  Class size: 18

 

12577

MUS 215  Masterworks of Music

Peter Laki

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course parallels Literature & Language of Music, but will focus on just a handful of pieces, exploring those pieces in great depth from a number of different viewpoints.  Students will read a substantial amount of specialized literature on each chosen work.  There will be two oral exams, one at mid-term and one at the end of the semester, where students will have to demonstrate familiarity with the works we have discussed and respond to the issues raised in the readings.  In addition, students will write a term paper on a work of their choice from the time period covered, applying the approaches and methodologies learned in class to some new material. The following works will be studied in the class: Dufay: “L’homme arme” Mass-Josquin:  L’homme arme” Mass (super voces musicales)- Palestrina: “L’homme arme” Mass; Monteverdi:  The Cornonation of Poppea; Bach:  Six Brandenburg Concertos; Beethoven:  String Quartet in B flat, op 130 and Grosse Fuge, op. 133. Readings will include: Wright, Craig.  The Maze and the Warrior;  Rosand , Ellen.  Monteverdi’s Last Operas:  A Venetian Trilogy; Marissen, Michael:  The Social and Religious Designs of J. S. Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos;  Winter, Robert and Robert Martin, eds. The Beethoven Quartet Companion.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors. 

Class size: 15

 

12553

MUS / CNSV 220   Music, Language, & Mind

John Halle

. . . Th .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

OLIN 106

AART

(4 credits)  A survey of recent work in musical cognition focussing on the connections between language and music.  Aniruddh Patel's recent  "Language, Music and the Brain” will serve as the main text augmented with additional readings by  Lerdahl, Baker, Jackendoff,  Meyer, Hayes and others. Among the broad questions we will attempt to address are the following.  Does the shared terminology we employ to refer to the basic elements of music and language-e.g. accent, rhythm, phrase, stress, etc.-  point  to underlying similarities in the two mental systems or does it obscure fundamental differences? What aspects of music are elucidated by the cognitive approach which forms the foundation of contemporary linguistics and what important characteristics of musical experience are, in principle, unanswerable by viewing music as a Chomskyan "natural object"?  Does the evidence offered by contemporary neuropsychological research indicate that linguistic and musical syntax make use of similar or distinct neural circuitry?  What kinds of empirical results would a definitive answer to this question require?  What evidence is there for a musi-language in our evolutionary history which would later bifurcate into language and music as distinct expressive and cognitive systems? What are the connections between poetic meter as a formal pattern (as defined in traditional prosody), rhythmicized speech (as in rap, chant and nursery rhymes), settings of metrical poetry by composers and song form?  Some fluency with musical notation will be helpful but is not required.  Open to college and conservatory students.

 

12573

MUS 254B  Pronunciation and Diction

for Singers II

Erika Switzer

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature.  The fall semester will be devoted to the Italian and French languages, the spring to German, English, and Latin.  Through songs, arias, and choral literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language.  While it is geared towards singers and collaborative pianists, the course is also useful for other instrumentalists and students seeking to refine pronunciation and accent.  Grading will be based on a series of quizzes and two exams, including the preparation and performance of one song per language.  Ability to read music is not required.  No previous knowledge of the languages is required.  Class size: 15

 

12592

MUS 257  Production & Reproduction

Tom Mark

M .  .  . .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

BLM N210

PART

This course will focus on the theory and practice of sound recording. Students will learn the use of recording equipment including digital tape recorders, mixing consoles, signal processing devices, and microphones. A/B listening tests will be used to compare types of microphones, microphone placement and many different recording techniques. ProTools software will be available for digital editing and mastering to CD. Assigned projects will include both multitrack and direct to stereo recordings of studio and concert performances. Class size: 15

 

12495

MUS 265   Literature and  Language

of Music II

Christopher Gibbs

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

BLM N217

AART

A survey of selected musical works composed in the 19th and 20th centuries.  Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits.  In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams.  As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected.  This course is primarily designed for music majors including sophomores. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  It is not required that students have taken the first semester (Music 264), which covered music from the Middle Ages to 1800.  Class size: 20

 

12434

MUS 266B   American Popular Song,

1930-1950

John Esposito

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies   This performance-based course is a survey of the major American popular song composers of the Tin Pan Alley era, whose work forms the core of the jazz repertoire. Composers studied will include Gershwin, Berlin, Porter, Ellington, Warren, Rodgers, and others. The course will include readings, recorded music, and films. The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony II or permission of the instructor.  Class size: 20

 

12440

MUS 266D   Jazz Repertory: John Coltrane

John Esposito

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

AART

An immersion in the music of a Jazz master; includes readings, recorded music and films.  Coltrane’s music will be performed in a workshop setting by students and instructor.  Visiting artists will play and discuss the music. Prerequisites: Jazz Harmony II, or permission of Instructor. This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 18

 

12423

MUS 331   Jazz: The Freedom Principle I

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies   A jazz study of the cross-pollination between Post-Bop in the late fifties and Free Jazz. The course, which employs a cultural approach, is also designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music to examine its effects on the music from 1958 to the mid-sixties. Emphasis will be on artists and composers such as Cecil Taylor, Ornette Coleman, Art Blakey, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Max Roach, Eric Dolphy, Charles Mingus, and Horace Silver. Illustrated with recordings, films, and videos.  Class size: 15

 

12426

MUS 336   Studies in French Music in the

19th Century

Peter Laki

. T . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed:  Victorian Studies  This seminar will address selected aspects of French music in the 19th century from Berlioz to Fauré.  The focus will be on listening and reading.  We will cover examples from all genres:  opera, choral music, symphonic and chamber music, piano music and art song.  Students will have to choose their special areas of research during the first few weeks of the course, give oral presentations and write a paper (an extended version of the presentation).  Special attention will be paid to the historical background including the 1830 and 1848 revolutions, the Second Empire, the Franco-Prussian war and the Third Republic.  Class size: 15

 

12523

MUS 340   Introduction to Experimental

Music

Richard Teitelbaum

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course deals with the experimental tradition starting from Henry Cowell’s radical innovations early in the 20th century, through those of his students, pre-eminently John Cage and others of the “California School” of the 30’s and 40’s, and “The New York School” around Cage that included Feldman, Brown, Wolf and Tudor in the 50’s. The primary focus however will be on the development of new forms, media and social organizations begun in the sixties and seventies, as exemplified by: text-based “event” pieces of the international Fluxus movement; the early minimalist works of La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich and Philip Glass; live electronic music of AMM in London, Musica Elettronica Viva in Rome and Sonic Arts Union in New York; the work of Cornelius Cardew and the Scratch Orchestra in London; and the influence of “open form” “free jazz” and “creative music” in establishing improvisationally-based compositional techniques and systems in the works of Anthony Braxton, George Lewis and others. In addition to studying the works this tradition has produced and discussing their aesthetic and philosophic underpinnings, students will be encouraged to realize and perform works by these composers, and to create new ones of their own.  Class size: 15

 

12451

MUS 345   Introductory Psychoacoustics

Robert Bielecki

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM 117

AART

"Reality is a myth, perception is what matters".  This course will examine auditory perception and hearing  and serve as an introduction to how hearing works. The first half of the semester begins with a description of the physiology and function of the ear and how we process auditory information.   Some topics include: perception of pitch, loudness, location, auditory illusions, critical bands, masking, threshold of hearing, hearing loss, and audiometry.   The second half of the semester will focus on sound localization and the technologies used in spatialization and 3-D audio. We will explore auditory localization cues, HRTF, binaural recording, spatial audio synthesis, sound for virtual realities and immersive environments. This course should be of particular interest to anyone involved in music and audio technology.  This course fulfills music theory requirements.  Class size: 15

 

12454

MUS 346   Interactive Performance/Compos

Robert Bielecki

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

MAX/MSP is an object oriented graphical programming environment for algorithmic music composition, interactivity, live processing, multimedia and more.  This course covers beginning, intermediate, and advanced methods of using MAX/MSP.  This will be a hands-on course with examples from artist’s work, several programming assignments and a final project.  Knowledge of computer programming and MIDI is not necessary, but would be helpful. This fulfills music theory requirements.  Class size: 15

 

12455

MUS 352   Electronic, Acoustic,  and

Computer Music Composition I

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing work as computer programs, digital or analog recordings and scores for live electronic realization.  These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members.  Installations and mixed media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Xenakis, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor. This fulfills music theory requirement.  Class size: 15

 

12431

MUS 353   Orchestration

George Tsontakis

M . . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BLM N217

PART

Students will learn how to score for instrumental combinations beginning with small ensembles up to full orchestra. There will be live demonstrations of orchestral instruments, listening and score study of orchestral literature, chord voicing and notation of bowings, breathing, articulations, and special orchestral effects as well as practice of basic conducting patterns and skills. Prerequisites:  Fundamentals of Music and composition workshop. There will be a reading of the orchestrations by the Bard College Orchestra.  Class size: 15

 

12427

MUS 357   Ethnomusicology: Music

and Tourism in South East Asia

Mercedes Dujunco

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Anthropology, Asian Studies  When music interfaces with tourism, a booming multinational industry, the result is a doubly potent medium of encounter. There is hardly a place on earth left untouched by the recreational geography of tourism. But the transformation of the general image of Southeast Asia, a region viewed as a tumultuous war zone as recently as two decades ago, to tourist paradise in the current period is nothing short of phenomenal and owes in large part to the annexation and highlighting of music and music-related forms within the tourism enterprise of many Southeast Asian countries.  This course will look at music-related tourism and tourist productions, including tourist discourse, settings, events, experiences, and artifacts from an ethnographic perspective focusing on the region of Southeast Asia. We will pay close attention to the political economy of tourism as seen through an analysis of specific sites within the region and analyze how music lends its powerful emotive role and ability to act as a metaphor to tourism in creating new local economies and changing the shape and infrastructure of places on the one hand, while raising questions of cultural authenticity and the nature of power relations between local people, tourist promoters, and tourists on the other. By zooming in on different experiences of music-related travel such as pilgrimage, hedonism, and heritage celebration in the form of festivals and cultural shows, it is hoped that students would not only learn about Southeast Asia, but also come to a deeper understanding of and critical engagement with theories of globalization, imperialism, experience, and identity that they could extrapolate and apply to an examination of tourism in relation to their individual areas of interest.

 Class size: 15

 

12453

MUS 358   Sound / Art Workshop in

Electro-Acoustic Composition and Interdisciplinarity

Marina Rosenfeld

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM 117

PART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society  Across the contemporary artistic spectrum, electro-acoustic sound and music are increasingly found in confrontation with the visual. This course will focus on the creative work of student composers with special emphasis on interdisciplinary forms. Readings will supplement compositional exercises, but the course is primarily intended as an open format for the critique and exploration of ongoing student work, as well as examination of works from the field, including in the areas of video, animation, digital media, broad- (or pod-) casting, and new forms of graphical/digital notation. Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor.  Class size: 15

 

12441

MUS 367B   Jazz Composition II

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This course continues the strategies from Jazz Composition I, including basic modal harmony, melodic and rhythmic development. Prerequisite: Jazz Composition I.  Class size: 15

 

MUSIC WORKSHOPS  (2 credits unless otherwise noted)

 

12445

MUS WKSHA   Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M . . . .

3:00 – 5:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class and then  eventually to professionals(the  Da Capo Players) who give a concert of some of that music at the end  of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should email Prof. Tower prior to registration to determine eligibility. Class size: 18

 

12444

MUS WKSHB   Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart

. T . Th F

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

4:00 -6:30 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration.  Students choose one of the three sessions.  Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart  by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration.  Class size: 20

 

12537

MUS WKSHD   Workshop: Sight Reading

Mike DeMicco

. .T . . .

12:00 -1:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  This workshop is designed to improve basic music reading skills.  Drawing from a varied selection of material such as lead sheets, jazz fake

book charts and simple to intermediate classical etudes, students learn to read melody and rhythm more confidently. This course works well for C

(concert) instruments and may be adapted for other instruments as well. Class size: 12

 

12538

MUS WKSHF Workshop:  Samba School

Carlos Valdez

. . . . .

 

.

PART

2 credits  Samba School provides the opportunity to learn exotic Brazilian rhythms (samba, maracatu, batucada, samba reggae).  All skill levels welcome.

Class size: 12

 

12497

MUS WKSHG   Workshop: Vocal & Voice

Arthur Burrows

. . W . .

10:10 - 12:10 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits In this singing class we explore the art songs of America, England, France and Germany, including some opera arias and ensembles depending on the make-up of the class. At the same time we learn the necessary technique to perform them successfully. Each class will be divided into two parts. The first will deal with vocal technique, and the second with technical issues that arise from individual performance. Requirements: the ability to match pitches, and an adequate vocal range. Pianists will be assigned individual singers to work with and coached in the various musical styles.

Class size: 12

 

12498

MUS WKSHL   Workshop: Opera Workshop

Rufus Muller /

Ilka LoMonaco

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits   Work is to be decided.  For more information see Prof. LoMonaco. Contact  Prof. LoMonaco by email: Ilka98@aol.com to arrange an audition before registration.  Class size: 20

 

12496

MUS WKSHM   Evidence of Things Not Seen

Rufus Muller

M . . . .

3:00 -6:00 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits  "Evidence of Things Not Seen": excerpts from Ned Rorem's eponymous song cycle for four singers, and American art songs of the 20th and 21st centuries.  Both pianists and singers are highly encouraged to participate in this performance course, in which the emphasis is on communication with the listener.  There will be a public recital at the end of the semester.  Class size: 20

 

12450

MUS WKSHV   Chinese Music Ensemble

Mercedes Dujunco

. T . Th .

4:40 -6:00 pm

BLM 117

PART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies   2 credits.  A beginner's workshop for students interested in learning to play Chinese folk music through performance on instruments of the "silk and bamboo" (Chinese string and wind instruments) category. Students acquire basic skills on one of several instruments that may include the di (bamboo transverse flute), the erhu (2-stringed fiddle), zheng (21-string plucked board zither), yangqin (hammered dulcimer), pipa (short-necked pear-shaped plucked lute), and sanxian (long-necked 3-stringed plucked lute), with the goal of eventually playing together in ensemble. 

Class size: 15

 

12452

MUS WKSHW   Workshop in Contemporary Electronics: The Turntable to Gameboy

Marina Rosenfeld

. . W . .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

BLM N119

PART

Cross-listed:  Science, Technology, and Society   2 credits  The turntable, the sampler, the drum machine, the walkman and other consumer-derived tools are at the crux of a contemporary branch of experimental electronic music that encompasses the work of artists as diverse as Philip Jeck, Christian Marclay, Janet Cardiff, Ikue Mori, Yasunao Tone, Aphex Twin, Laurie Anderson and Otomo Yoshihide. The class will explore this music as an instrument-based practice, with a special emphasis on the turntable as an instrument whose material properties, as well as cultural significance, define its uses as an improvisatory and compositional tool. Conceptualism and visual art, free improvisation, electronic composition, DJ culture, multi-media, as well as the history and legacy of inventor-artists who pioneered the creative use or “misuse” of audio technology (John Cage, King Tubby, Milan Knizak, Grandmaster Flash) will all be considered as antecedents of contemporary practice. Students will be required to create and perform several short pieces and one larger-scale composition project exploiting the properties of one or more electronic instruments. Class size: 16

 

12442

MUS WKSP4   Workshop:

Jazz Improvisation II

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  This class is structured as a continuation of Jazz Improvisation I. The goal will be to gain mastery over all of the basic scales used in traditional jazz improvisation, and to attain the ability to improvise over basic two-five patterns and simple modal progressions. Prerequisite:  Jazz Improvisation Workshop I, or consent of the instructor.  Class size: 16

 

12435

MUS WKSP7   Jazz Vocal Workshop

Pamela Pentony

M . . . .

4:00 -5:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  Beginning level course:  The Jazz Vocal Workshop is a performance workshop designed to familiarize the beginning singer with the components of a successful jazz performance.  How to begin a song (intros) and how to end a song (outros and turnarounds), how to pick a key, a song and a tempo.  How to utilize simple (and not so simple) arrangements.  Particular attention is paid to phrasing.  The language of scat singing, with emphasis on practice in every class.  The forms of the blues, rhythm changes and 32 bar song form, and practical applications taken from The Great American Songbook.  There is one (or more) concert(s) scheduled during the semester and students are encouraged to seek out and perform in many local venues.  There is a final exam in this class.  Class size: 16

 

SPECIAL PROJECTS  Special Projects are designed for music majors only, to pursue individual or group projects with a particular professor.

 

12460

MUS PROJ EL  Special Projects

Erica Lindsay

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PART

 

12461

MUS PROJ JB  Special Projects

James Bagwell

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PART

 

12465

MUS PROJ JE  Special Projects

John Esposito

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PART

 

12462

MUS PROJ JT  Special Projects

Joan Tower

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PART

 

12463

MUS PROJ KG  Special Projects

Kyle Gann

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PART

 

12443

MUS PROJ LGR  Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

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PART

 

12464

MUS PROJ TB  Special Projects

Thurman Barker

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PART

 

PRIVATE LESSONS

Please Note: There is a $150.00 Private Lesson Fee each semester for any student taking private lessons.  If a student decides to drop private lessons they must fill out a Drop/Add form, have it signed by the appropriate department faculty and deliver it to the Office of the Registrar on or before Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 5 PM or they will be charged and responsible for the $150.00 Department Fee. Students who opt to take lessons not-for-credit will be responsible for the full cost of the lessons themselves.  Not available for on-line registration.

 

Private Lessons are offered as follows:

 

 


JAZZ Instructor:

Instrument:

CLASSICAL Instructor:

Instrument:

David Arner

Piano

Greg Dinger

Guitar

Ira Coleman

Bass

Steven Hammer

Oboe

Kenny Davis

Bass

Laura Majestic

Harp

Mike DeMicco

Guitar

Garfield Moore

Cello

Greg Glassman

Trumpet

Sakiko Ohashi

Piano

Peter O’Brien

Drums

Elisabeth Romano

Bassoon

Pamela Pentony

Voice

Erica Switzer

Sight Reading

Vincent Prudente

Trombone

John  Charles Thomas

Trumpet

Carlos Valdez

Percussion

Alex Waterman

Cello

Bruce Williams

Saxophone