12081

HIST 1001   Revolution

Robert Culp /

 Gregory Moynahan

. T . . .

. . . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

10:10 - 11:30 am

PRE 110

OLIN 201/202

HIST

Cross-listed:  Asian Studies,  Human Rights   What is revolution? Why does it happen? Where and when have revolutions occurred, and to what effect? This course addresses these questions by exploring a range of revolutions in Europe and Asia during the past five centuries. A primary focus of the course will center on analyzing and comparing some of the most iconic and influential revolutions in world history: the French Revolution of 1789, the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, and the Chinese Communist Revolution of 1921-1949. In addition, we will analyze the causes and impact of a range of other revolutionary moments, including the German Peasant Revolt of 1525, the Taiping Rebellion, the Meiji Restoration, the 1905 Revolution in Russia, the 1911 Revolution in China, China's Cultural Revolution, the protests by students and intellectuals that rocked continental Europe in 1968, and the "velvet revolutions" and near revolutions that transformed state socialism in 1989. As we compare revolutions over time, we will try to discern links or lines of influence between revolutionary movements. We will also explore how particular revolutionary movements contributed to a shared repertoire of revolutionary thought and action. No previous study of history is necessary for this course; first-year students are welcome.  Class size: 44

 

12098

HIST 102   Europe since 1815

Gennady Shkliarevsky

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

ALBEE 106

HIST

Cross listed: Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Victorian Studies  The course has two goals:  to provide a general introduction to European History in the period from 1815 to 1990 and at the same time to examine a number of especially important developments in greater depth.  The first half of the course will range in time from the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to the outbreak of World War I in 1914.  The following issues will be emphasized:  the rise of conservative, liberal and socialist thought; the establishment of parliamentary democracy in Great Britain; the revolutions of 1848; Bismarck and the Unification of Germany; European imperialism; and the origins of World War I.  The second half of the course will stress the following problems:  World War I; the Russian Revolution and the emergence of Soviet Russia; the Versailles Treaty; the Great Depression; the rise of fascism, especially Nazism; the Holocaust; the emergence of a new Europe with the "European Community"; the Cold War; the fall of communism in Eastern Europe; and the reunification of Germany.

Class size: 22

 

12107

HIST 138   The Mediterranean World

Tabetha Ewing

. T . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

OLIN 101

HIST

Cross-listed:   Environmental & Urban Studies "The Mediterranean is not even a single sea, it is a complex of seas; and these seas are broken up by islands, interrupted by peninsulas, ringed by intricate coastlines. Its life is linked to the land, its poetry more than half-rural, its sailors may turn peasant with the seasons; it is the sea of vineyards and olive trees just as much as the sea of long-oared galleys and the roundships of merchants. . . ." This course is a historical journey to the Mediterranean world of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries using as our vehicle the great scholarship of Fernand Braudel, quoted above. We will consider geography, demography, climate, and economies in the first part of the course; the formation of social structures in the second; and Jewish, Christian, and Muslim religion and culture in the final third. Any student seeking an introduction to this period or these places --Spain, Italy, Southern France, and North Africa-- are invited to explore this exquisite basin of physical and human diversity.  Class size: 22

 

12099

HIST 140   Introduction to Russian

Civilization

Gennady Shkliarevsky

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 202

HIST

Cross-listed: Medieval Studies, Russian and Eurasian Studies   This course examines the origins and evolution of Russian civilization from the founding of the first Eastern Slavic state through the eighteenth century, when Russia began to modernize by borrowing from Western culture. Among the topics to be considered are the ethnogeny of early Russians, the development of state and legal institutions, the relationship between kinship and politics, the role of religion in public and private spheres, economic organization, social institutions, family, gender relations, sexuality, popular culture, and the impact of the outside world (both Orient and Occident) upon Russian society. The sources include a variety of Russian cultural expressions (folk tales, literature, art, film, music), original documents, and scholarly texts.  Class size: 22

 

12089

HIST 153   Diaspora and Homeland:

A Global Core Course

Myra Armstead /

Cecile Kuznitz

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 203

HIST/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies; Human Rights; Jewish Studies; Related interest: Asian Studies  The concept of Diaspora has gained widespread popularity as a way of thinking about group identity and its relationship to place. In an era of increasing globalization individuals are more likely to emigrate to distant shores, although this is in fact a longstanding historical phenomenon. Homelands in turn have taken on multiple, complex meanings in the imaginations and lived experience of migrant populations, particularly in recent times as technological and transportation innovations facilitate the maintenance of links with native lands.  In this course we will read recent theoretical works on Diaspora and then examine case studies of diasporic populations from ancient times to the present.  We will inquire about the extent to which Diaspora is celebrated or lamented, how this attitude affects real and imagined ties to homelands.  While our focus will be chiefly on diasporic peoples themselves, we will examine the perspective of native/homeland populations on such issues as well.  Case studies will include the first and longest-lived diasporic minority group, the Jewish people; black African-descended people since the trans-Atlantic slave trade; and select groups othered as “Asian.”  Class size: 44

 

12104

HIST 183   The United States in the Middle East: A History

Jennifer Derr

. T . Th .

4:40 -6:00 pm

OLIN 202

HIST

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies, American Studies, Global & Int’l Studies Human Rights, Middle Eastern Studies  This course interrogates the history of American involvement in the Middle East. Beginning in the early nineteenth century, we will explore the history of American merchants in the Mediterranean and Red Sea, the significance of American missionaries in the region during the European colonial period, and immigration patterns to the United States. In the post-colonial era, we will discuss a wide range of historical developments including American interests during the Cold War, the 1958 Lebanon crisis, the emergence of an American-Israeli alliance, the 1973 oil embargo, the 1979 Iranian revolution and the American hostage crisis, the histories of Arab communities in the United States, and the American invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan. While focused on specific historical developments, this course will also engage a broader body of literature concerning Cold War politics, neo-colonialism, and the American relationship to the rise of Islamism. Class size: 22

 

12533

HIST 2017   Berlin - Vienna:The Science of  Metropolis, 1890-1933

Gregory Moynahan

. T . Th .

1:30 – 2:50 pm

OLIN 309

HIST

Cross-listed:  German Studies, Environmental & Urban Studies, Science, Technology & Society  Following a tour of central Europe in 1914, the American reformer Frederic Howe marvelled at how: “Administrative and industrial efficiency are a scientific study in which hundreds of thousands of the best minds of the state are engaged… scientific thought [is applied] to every process and every social and industrial problem.” In this course we will use the two principal metropoles of the central European empires, Berlin and Vienna, to examine this process and the reactions against it. Each city presents both a microcosm of its larger traditional society and an entirely new confrontation with modernity, with science often appearing as the intermediary between the two. As a means of delimiting our theme, we will use the interrelated lives of two commentators on this process, the Berlin sociologist Georg Simmel [1858-1918] and the Viennese novelist Robert Musil [1880-1942]. Key topics will include the political roles of positivism and critical positivism, the development of new “sciences of the state” and social sciences, the development of racist and demographic pseudoscience, and the political role of the natural sciences.

Class size: 18

 

12092

HIST 2134   Comparative Atlantic Slave Societies

Christian Crouch

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 204

HIST

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies, American Studies, French Studies, Human Rights, LAIS  Forced labor, whether indentured or enslaved, underpinned the early modern Atlantic world.  Beginning in the early sixteenth century, millions of enslaved Africans and indigenous Americans came to or moved around the Americas.  The wide variety of societies bordering the Atlantic that created these zones of interaction became places of contested and changing cultural practice.  Peoples of African, Native American, and mixed descent not only struggled to survive in the early modern Atlantic but also to fundamentally shape these new locations as many fought to gain or preserve their freedom.  Historians in the last thirty years have demonstrated how the territories bordering this ocean were an English Atlantic, a Dutch Atlantic, a French Atlantic, and an Iberian Atlantic. Yet the actors and agents who shaped or were shaped by Atlantic systems are often hidden in the record by virtue of being indigenous, enslaved, or indentured.  Students of history, need to consider why it is important to restore a “Kongolese,” “Cherokee,” or “métis” Atlantic to the established set of European empires that are all-too-often seen to dominate the Atlantic world perspective.   This course focuses on the African and indigenous Atlantics, and looks at a world of comparative slave societies in this early modern zone.  It considers three important issues: the comparative development of slavery, the methods of resistance, and the processes of emancipation and national formations at the end of the eighteenth century. Studying the differing experiences of Africans around the Atlantic and how they helped to shape the diversity of the colonial experience will enable students to trace the initial development of “African American” culture, as well as “Afro-Brazilian,” “Afro-Mexican,” or “Afro-Caribbean” cultures.  We will investigate what the implications are of how we write or remember the history of this region and trace the intersections that created race, gender, and class through slave societies. The course will end in the early years of the “age of emancipations,” with the most famous of all slave rebellions: the Haitian Revolution.  This cataclysmic event gave rise to the world’s first black republic and if the rhetoric of empire ushered in the birth of the “Atlantic World,” we live today with the mature, and lasting, effects and memories of these vital interactions.  Class size: 22

 

12088

HIST 2141   Zionism and Jewish Nationalism

Cecile Kuznitz

. T . Th .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

RKC 115

HIST/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Human Rights; Jewish Studies; Russian & Eurasian Studies  This course will focus on Zionism and other forms of Jewish nationalism in historical context. We will explore the European background of these movements including the rise of nationalism among the “small peoples” of Eastern Europe; assimilation and its discontents in Western Europe and antisemitism in the Russian Empire; European colonialism; and the popularity of socialism and other radical movements. We will then examine various ideologies such as political, cultural, labor, religious and revisionist Zionism; Territorialism; and socialist and liberal Diaspora Nationalism. We will consider the answers proposed by each movement to questions such as, what is the most effective means of securing the rights of Jews as a stateless minority? How should Jews relate to the other groups among whom they live? Do Jews need a territory of their own, and if so, why? We will concentrate on European movements and thinkers but also consider how these ideas played out in the United States and Israel.  Class size: 22

 

12100

HIST 2191   Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World

Carolyn Dewald

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 203

HIST / DIFF

Cross-listed:  Classical Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies   The course explores the gendered relations of men and women in the ancient Greco-Roman world.  We concentrate on literary and historical sources, in order to understand both the social history of ancient sexuality and the literary documents that show its most complex manifestations. Topics include: early Greek sources; women's lives in classical Athens; Greek homoerotic relationships; sexuality as part of Greek drama, religion and mythology; women in Roman myth, literature, and history; differences in Greek and Roman sexual/social bonds.  Class size: 22

 

12105

HIST 2203   The Politics of the Post-Colonial Middle East

Jennifer Derr

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 201

HIST

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies, Environmental & Urban Studies, Global & Int’l Studies Human Rights, Middle East Studies  This course explores the political trajectory of the post-colonial Middle East. Drawing on literature produced by historians, political scientists, and anthropologists, we will explore a range of themes and historical developments including: the impact of the Cold War and the rise of Third Worldism, the role of women’s movements, the coalescence of political Islam, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Lebanese Civil War, the impact of oil production, the Iranian Revolution, and the rise of the Arabian Gulf. The course will end with a substantive examination of the wave of revolutions the have swept the Middle East in the past year. This course engages a broader realm of theory concerning the development of politics of the region and the motivations and interests of its primary political actors. Class size: 22

 

12096

HIST 2253   An Ecological History of the Globe

Alice Stroup

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 308

HIST

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies, Science, Technology & Society  Human technology and population growth have damaged the Earth through deforestation, erosion, salinization of soil, and species loss.  Where our moral sensibilities look to repair or reduce ecological damage, our study of historical and evolutionary processes helps identify the processes, from political to ecological, more likely to succeed in that endeavor.  In this course, therefore, we will examine case studies from prehistory to the present, around the world, to reconsider human institutions, cultures, and choices in ecological context.   Class size: 22

 

12090

HIST/ LIT  2319   Global Victorians

Deirdre d'Albertis /

Richard Aldous

. . W . F

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 205

HIST

Cross-listed: Literature, Victorian Studies  They went everywhere. They did everything. Long before ‘globalization’ the Victorians had their own global vision and imagined the world universally. In their voyages of discovery they set out to achieve mastery of others and themselves, as well as attempting to map and understand the natural world around them. Our course will focus on this project of empire both from within and without, drawn together by texts on exploration and discovery. Authors studied may include Charlotte Bronté, Joseph Conrad, Sir Richard F. Burton, Rudyard Kipling, Anna Leonowens and Winston Churchill among others.

Class size: 30

 

12093

HIST 2356   Native Peoples of North America

Christian Crouch

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 202

HIST/DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights    From Sacajawea's appearance on the dollar coin to Squanto's role in elementary school classrooms teaching the first Thanksgiving, Americans obsess, discuss, question, imagine, construct, impose, and ponder the role and place of the indigenous population in this country.  Of less awareness is the history of interactions between indigenous Americans and the Africans and African Americans after the Columbian exchange.  This course provides an overview of the history created by and between native peoples, Africans, and Europeans from the fifteenth through the twentieth century.   Special attention will be paid to the exchanges and contests between Native Americans and African Americans in the colonial and early national period, as well as today.   The focus will be on both primary sources and historical interpretations of interactions in order to provide a context for evaluating questions of current Native American politics and the question of financial and land reparations.  Class size: 22

 

12265

HIST 254   The American Civil War: A History

Casey King

   . . . Th .

  . . . . F

7:00 – 9:00 pm

10:10 -11:30 am

OLIN 102

OLIN 205

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies   No event looms larger in American historical consciousness than the Civil War. Southerners still revere Dixie and fly the Stars and Bars. Tourists flock to battlefield memorials. Yet, questions remain long unsettled about why the war was fought and what it meant to those who fought it. Was it war over slavery or to preserve the union? Did the North win or the South lose?  Why did Union and Confederate forces meet at Gettysburg and how did that monumental clash affect the outcome of the war? What role did slaves play in the war in which Lincoln liberated them? What made Lincoln such effective wartime president?  Grant and Lee such admired generals? And what would have happened if Lincoln had not been assassinated at Ford’s theater? This course will take up those questions and more.  Class size: 22

 

12376

HIST 2832   FDR and the Birth of the Modern Presidency

David Woolner

   . T . Th .

1:30 – 2:50 pm

OLIN 203

HIST

Cross-listed:  American Studies  This course examines Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s response to the global crisis of 1933 to 1945 with a view toward gaining a greater understanding of how his policies transformed America, the world and the office of the U.S. presidency during these critical years. In doing so this course seeks to gain answers to a number of critical questions: What were the key long-lasting elements of the New Deal that helped reshape the role of government in our society? What was the relationship—if any—between FDR’s domestic reforms of the 1930s and the global economic crisis that was going on at the same time? How did the United States use its involvement in the Second World War as a catalyst for a restructuring of the world’s political, strategic, and economic makeup? What are the long-term consequences of his policies, how did they affect the presidency, and do they continue to fashion the world we live in today?  Class size: 22

 

12087

HIST 3135   Biography and U.S. History

Myra Armstead

M . . . .

3:10 -5:30 pm

OLIN 303

HIST

Cross-listed:  American Studies  This course will allow students to assess the flexibility of biography as a genre of historical writing.  Students will survey the ways in which life stories can convey multiple and often opposing understandings of the past:  They can reinforce “Great Man” understandings of history, recover the role of ordinary people, confirm the idea of individual agency, highlight the inexorable power of context in framing individual decision-making, precisely locate and define extraordinary actions and actors, render history in human terms, and suggest rightly or wrongly a coherence to the past. By reading and constructing selected biographies in U.S. history, students will consider all these ways of reading biographies.  A long research paper in which students either evaluate a set of biographies of a single historical figure or produce a historically contextualized biography of a historical figure will be required.  This course is a research seminar and serves as a major conference for students concentrating in Historical Studies.  Class size: 15

 

12094

HIST 3145   Jamestown

Christian Crouch

. . . Th .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

OLIN 309

HIST

Cross-listed:  American Studies, Environmental & Urban Studies    This class is designed to expose students first to various methodologies and approaches used in writing early American history and then to apply these strategies in their own research papers.  The first half of the course investigates the current historiographical trends centered on the topic of the English settlement of Jamestown, which just celebrated its 400th Anniversary in 2007.  Themes for discussion will include the political implications of colonial history and for national history (such as the “myth of Pocahontas”).  We will also cover the accessibility of sources and strategies used by scholars to retrieve and reconstruct different historical voices, particularly those of enslaved or indigenous Americans.  Finally, course texts provide an introduction to the problems and possibilities of transnational, global, or multi-disciplinary approaches to local history.  The second half of the course centers on an intensive investigation of primary source materials, in published primary sources and through the media portal of Virtual Jamestown.  These sources will form the core of the research papers students will generate at the end of the semester.  In order to provide the fullest experience of the craft of history, papers will be presented in multiple drafts, circulated, and discussed in a workshop format for the final four weeks of class.  Class size: 15

 

12593

JS 320  Antisemitism: A Comprehensive Examination

Kenneth Stern

. . . Th .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

OLIN 107

HIST

See Jewish Studies section for description.

 

12095

HIST / SOC 322   A Sociologic Classic: Middletown and America

Joel Perlmann

. . W . .

6:20 -8:40 pm

OLIN 201

SSCI/DIFF

See Sociology section for description.

 

12080

HIST 340   The Politics of History

Robert Culp

M . . . .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

OLIN 303

HISTDIFF

Cross-listed:  Human Rights; Global & Int’l Studies   What are the origins of history as a modern discipline? How have particular modes of history developed in relation to nationalism, imperialism, and the emergence of the modern state? How have modern historical techniques served to produce ideology? Moreover, how has history provided a tool for unmasking and challenging different forms of domination and the ideologies that help to perpetuate them? This course will address these questions through theoretical readings that offer diverse perspectives on the place of narrative in history, the historian's relation to the past, the construction of historiographical discourses, and the practice of historical commemoration. Other readings will critically assess the powerful roles that historical narrative, commemoration, and institutions like the museum have played in the processes of imperialism and nation building, as well as in class and gender politics. Some of the writers to be discussed will be Hayden White, Dominick LaCapra, Michel Foucault, G.W.F. Hegel, Walter Benjamin, Joan Wallach Scott, and theorists active in the Subaltern Studies movement. In addition to our common readings, students will write a research paper that builds on the critical perspectives we have discussed during the semester. Students who have moderated in history are particularly welcome.   Class size: 15