BARD COLLEGE

SPRING 2012 COURSE LIST ADDENDUM

 

 

Courses added:

 

12883

BIO 123   Sex and Gender

Felicia Keesing

. . W . F

9:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 114/115

SCI

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies;  Science, Technology, & Society      Why are there so many differences in the social behaviors of men and women? Why are there two sexes? Why do women get depressed more often than men but commit suicide less often? Why are women, on average, shorter than men? Why do they live longer? Students in this course, intended for nonscientists, examine the biological bases of sex and gender. They consider evidence for hypotheses that attempt to explain differences in behavior between males and females, including data from behavioral studies on both humans and other animals. The genetic and hormonal determinants of sex and gender are investigated, and the arguments for how and why sex evolved in the first place are considered, especially in light of the strong evolutionary advantages of self-cloning. No specific science or mathematics background beyond algebra is required.

 

12634

FSEM II KY First Year Seminar

Kritika Yegnashankaran

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 309/303

 

 

12636

MUS 106   Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia Renart

TBA

TBA

TBA

PART

Class size: 20

 

12637

MUS 108B   Ensemble: Contemporary

Blair McMillen

TBA

TBA

TBA

PART

Class size: 20

 

12641

MUS 108H  Ensemble: Gamelan

Mercedes Dujunco

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

OLIN 305

PART

Class size: 22

 

12756

LIT 103 B  Introduction to Literary Studies

Nancy Leonard

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 308

ELIT

The aim of this course is to develop the student’s ability to perform close readings of literature. By exploring the moment-to-moment unfolding of sounds, rhythms, and meanings in a wide range of works—poems, short stories, plays, and novels—from a wide range of time periods and national traditions, students will lay the groundwork for future literature courses. They will gain, in addition, a familiarity with some of the basic topics of literary study, such as the relationship between language and consciousness, the relationship between written language and other modes of representation, and the question of what makes a piece of writing “literary” in the first place.  Class size: 15

 

12638

LIT 2159   Into the Whirlwind: Literary Greatness and Gambles

Jonathan Brent

. . W . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

OLIN 203

ELIT/DIFF

Cross-listed: Russian and Eurasian Studies   This course will examine the fate of the literary imagination in Russia from the time of the Revolution to the stagnation of the Brezhnev period.  We will look at the majestic, triumphant imaginative liberation in writers such as Isaac Babel, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Osip Mandelstam and Mikhail Bulgakov; the struggle with ideology and the Terror of the 1930s in Yuri Olesha, Anna Akhmatova, Lidia Chukovskaya, Mikhail Zoshchenko, Varlam Shalamov, Boris Pilnyak and Yuri Tynyanov; the hesitant Thaw as reflected in Boris Pasternak’s Dr. Zhivago; and the course will conclude by reading Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and  Moscow to the End of the Line, by Venedikt Erofeev. Readings of literary works will be supplemented with political and historical documents to provide a sense of the larger political-social-historical context in which they were written. After the violent, imaginative ebullience of the Revolutionary period, how did literature stay alive during the darkest period of mass repression, censorship and terror when millions of Soviet citizens were either imprisoned or shot?  What formal/aesthetic choices did these writers make in negotiating the demands of official ideology and Party discipline, on the one hand, and authentic literary expression, on the other?  What image of history and of man did these “Engineers of human souls” produce?  These are some of the questions we will ask and seek to answer.  All readings will be in English.  Class size: 20

 

12865

PS 115   Intro to Political Thinking

David Kettler

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 107

SSCI

An introduction to some central themes in modern political thought, drawing primarily on four seminal thinkers of the eighteenth and nineteenth century: David Hume (supplemented by Adam Smith and Adam Ferguson), Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Stuart Mill (including The Subjection of Women), and Karl Marx.  Among themes to be discussed are property, interests, democracy, power in the socio-economic and political domains, historical periodization, revolution, and ideology. 

Class size: 15

 

Course cancellations:

 

12284

BIO 202   Ecology and Evolution

Felicia Keesing

. . W . .

. . . . F

8:30 - 11:30 am

9:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 114/115

SCI

 

12075

LIT 365   Shakespeare Seminar:  Politics

And the Sacred

Nancy Leonard

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 310

ELIT

 

12318

PS 286   Political Science and Political

Theory 1950-70

David Kettler

. . . . F

10:10 - 12:30 pm

OLIN 107

SSCI

 

Change in Credits

 

These courses earn 2 credits

 

New York Live Arts courses:

Technique courses led by New York Live Arts meet four times each week, and  will be taught by teaching artists from the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and Live Arts artist base.  All inquiries should be directed to Leah Cox at btjaz@bard.edu.

 

12476

DAN 212   Intermediate Modern Dance

Class size: 25

 

Live Arts

M . W . .

. T . Th .

10:10 – 11:30 am

10:10 - 11:30 am

FISHER PAC

MPR CAMPUS CNTR

PART

 

12475

DAN 312   Advanced Dance

Class size: 25

 

Live Arts

M . W . .

. T . Th .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

11:50 -1:10 pm

FISHER PAC

MPR CAMPUS CNTR

PART

 

Schedule changes:

 

12405

ART 301 LB  Painting III: Horror Vaccui

Laura Battle

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

UBS

PART

 

12483

DAN 212 JC  Intermediate Modern Dance

Jean Churchill

. T . Th .

8:30 – 9:50 am

FISHER PAC

PART

 

12489

DAN 316 PF  Dance Repertory

Peggy Florin

. T . . .

 . . .  . F

3:10 – 4:30 pm

11:30 -1:10 pm

MPR

FISHER PAC

PART

 

12593

JS 320  Antisemitism: A Comprehensive Examination

Kenneth Stern

. . . . F

10:10 - 12:30 pm

OLIN 202

HIST

 

12445

MUS WKSHA   Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M . . . .

3:00 – 5:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

 

12361

PHOT 104   Photography for Non-majors

David Bush

. . . Th .

6:00 -9:00 pm

WDS

PART

 

12369

PHOT 316   Art & the Uses of Photography

Barbara Ess

. T . . .

1:30 – 4:30 pm

WDS

PART

Note: This class is not cross-listed with Human Rights.

 

12058

HR 214   A History of International Human Rights Law

Nadia Latif

M . W . .

4:40 – 6:00 pm

HEG 308

HIST/DIFF

 

12268

PHIL 118   Human Nature

Kritika Yegnashankaran

M . W . .

10:10 – 11:30 am

OLIN 202

HUM

 

Correction to credits:

 

12456

MUS 105   Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30 - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

1 credit.  First rehearsal will be on Tuesday, February 14, 2012. Class size: 35

 

12636

MUS 106   Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia Renart

TBA

TBA

TBA

PART

2 credits.   Class size: 20

 

Change in room:

 

12478

DAN 120   Introduction to Contact Improvisation

Amii LeGendre

. T . Th .

8:30 -9:50 am

MPR CAMPUS

CNTR

PART

 

Correction:

LIT 223 – Cultural Reportage does not require a portfolio for admission.

 

LIT 2207 – Reading as Writing as Reading, Part 3, does not require a portfolio.  Contact Prof. Lauterbach (annotate@aol.com)  regarding registration.

 

Correction to Distribution area:

 

12468

CHI 150   Asian Humanities Seminar

Andrew Schonebaum

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 303

HUM/DIFF

 

Correction to course:

 

CMSC 143 will be offered in place of CMSC 141:

 

12606

CMSC 143   Object Oriented Programming

With Robots

Keith O'Hara

                    LAB:

M . W .

. . . . F.

10:10 - 11:30 am

10:30 - 12:30 pm

RKC 107

RKC 107

MATC

Cross-listed:  Mind, Brain & Behavior   This course introduces students with prior programming experience to object-oriented design and programming through the design and implementation of mobile robot programs. The programs will enable the robot to move around the world, reacting to sensors such as obstacle detectors and a color camera.  Students will learn how to move from an informal problem statement, through increasingly precise problem specifications, to design and implementation of a solution.  Good programming habits will be emphasized. Purchase of a small personal robot (to be specified by the instructor) is recommended. Prerequisite: any Introduction to Computing course, or permission of the instructor.  Class size: 20

 

Change in title and description:

 

12299

CMSC 308   Seminar: Cognitive Science Research

Rebecca Thomas

. . W . .

6:30 -8:00 pm

RKC 101

MATC

2 credits This seminar, required of all juniors and seniors in Mind, Brain, and Behavior/Cognitive Science, explores the primary literature relevant to a particular question about cognition. Students are responsible for selecting papers, presenting material, and leading discussion. Prerequisite: Moderated status or permission of the instructor.  Class size: 20

 

Description corrections:

 

12164

AS 101   Introduction to American Studies

Donna Grover

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 202

HUM

This course is an introduction to the multidisciplinary study of American culture.  We will examine both the problematics and the fruits of a national culture.  Weighed down with the authority of custom, a national culture imposes a sense of obligation to all who belong to a society, but it affects groups and individuals differently, according to the variables of gender, race and class.  This course will compare and contrast visions of American culture during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  We will study the works of Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson, W.E.B DuBois,   F. Scott Fitzgerald, Georgia O’Keeffe, Elvis Presley among others..  Class size: 22

 

12269

PHIL 237   Symbolic Logic

William Griffith

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

ASP 302

MATC

Cross listed:  Mind, Brain & Behavior   Students will learn to use several different symbolic systems, some developed thousands of years apart, in order to formally test the validity of deductive arguments expressed in ordinary language of various levels of complexity.  Beginning from the common notion of a valid argument the course progresses through:  truth tables; a system of natural deduction for propositional logic, which is proven to be consistent and complete; Aristotelian logic - immediate inference, mediate inference, the square of opposition; Venn diagrams; monadic quantificational theory; general quantificational theory, including identity.  At each level the interrelationship between formal systems, their consistency and completeness being kept in view, and their interpretation in English is stressed. The course ends with a discussion of the extension of such work into higher orders of logic and the foundations of mathematics and the surprise (at the time) of Godel’s incompleteness proof.   No prerequisite.  Class size: 22

 

12272

PHIL 281   Philosophy of William James

William Griffith

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

ASP 302

HUM

William James (1842–1910) wrote and lectured on philosophy for both the emerging “profession” and for lay persons, and he did so with unusual style and clarity.  In his lifetime, he earned an international reputation in both philosophy and psychology and became the most widely known philosopher in America.  Among the topics to be studied are the subject matter and nature of psychology, religious experience, various issues of both metaphysics and ethics, and the pragmatic theory of truth. 

William James brought heart to the intellect and passion to the world of ideas in an unprecedented manner in American life. He is the most profound, adorable, and unpretentious public intellectual in American history.  Cornel West, Princeton University    Prerequisites:  None.  Open to students of all levels.   Class size: 18

 

Additional cross-listings:

 

12214

ARTH 128   Art of the Ancient Near East

Julia Rosenbaum

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

Cross-listed:  Classical Studies 

 

12242

LIT 2026   Introduction to Children’s

 and Young Adult Literature

Maria Cecire Sachiko

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLINLC 120

ELIT

Cross-listed:  Gender & Sexuality Studies

 

12270

PHIL 265   The Unconscious

Kritika Yegnashankaran

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 202

HUM

Cross listed:  Mind, Brain & Behavior; Science, Technology & Society