11425

THTR 101   Introduction to Acting

Lynn Hawley

M . W . .

1:30  - 2:50 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

3 credits  This course, intended for prospective theater majors, focuses on accessing the beginning actor’s imagination and creative energy.  Using theater games, movement work, and improvisational techniques, the intent is to expand the boundaries of accepted logic and to encourage risk-taking in the actor.  Course work includes intensive classroom sessions, individual projects designed to promote self-discovery, and group projects focused on the process of collaborative work.  Class size: 18

 

11435

THTR 101 NT  Introduction to Acting

Naomi Thornton

. . . Th .

3:45  - 5:45 pm

FISH THTR

PART

2 credits    Scene preparation and beginning scene technique.  Emphasis on relaxation, breathing, and concentration.  Teaching the actor to make choices and implement them using sense memory and to integrate this work with the text.  Group and individual exercises and improvisations. Continuous work on the acting instrument stressing freedom, spontaneity, and individual attention. Materials: poems, monologues, stories, and scenes.  Reading of American plays, 1930 to present.   Class size: 18

 

11424

THTR 103   Acting Company

Lynn Hawley

M . W . .

11:50  - 1:10 pm

FISH THTR

PART

3 credits Corresponding with Directing Seminar, actors work with student directors on scene work for in-class presentation. Open to first year students.  

Class size: 18

 

11441

THTR 121   Movement for Actors

Jean Churchill

. . .Th .

10:10  - 11:30 am

FISHER PAC

 

1 credit  Basic training in movement, rhythm, development of technique and confidence in space. Class size: 18

 

11428

THTR 131   Voice for Majors

Elizabeth Smith

. T . . F

10:10  - 11:30 am

FISHER PAC

PART

2 credits This course is designed to develop an awareness of the importance of physical relaxation, breath capacity and control, resonance and placement. There will also be an emphasis on clarity of articulation and the use of vocal range and inflection. This course is intended for moderated and prospective theater majors. Not available for on-line registration.   Class size: 12

 

11432

THTR 142   Alexander Technique II

Judith Muir

M . . . .

11:00  - 12:50 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

1 credit Level II deepens the study of Alexander Technique including the developmental movements that children make from birth to upright posture.

 Class size: 16

 

11440

THTR 207   Playwriting I

Zakiyyah Abdul-Rahiim

. . . . F

10:10  - 12:30 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

4 credits   An introductory course that focuses on discovering the writer’s voice. Through writing exercises based on dreams, visual images, poetry, social issues, found text, and music, each writer is encouraged to find his or her unique language, style, and vision.  A group project will explore the nature of collaborative works.  Students learn elements of playwriting through writing a one-act play, reading assignments, and class discussions. Class size: 12

 

11436

THTR 208   Playwriting II

Zakiyyah Abdul-Rahiim

. . . Th .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

4 credits   This course will function as a writer’s workshop. Students focus on developing a full-length play, with sections of the work-in-progress presented in class for discussions.  Students grow as playwrights by developing characters and themes that are sustained through a full-length play.  The students will also read a wide range of dramatic literature and be exposed to diverse styles of playwriting. Prerequisite: Playwriting I or Theatrical Adaptations.   Class size: 12

 

11427

THTR 209   Scene Study

Jonathan Rosenberg

. T . Th .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

3 credits   A course intended for students who have taken one semester of Intro to Acting and would like to continue their study. The course deals with movement from a games oriented curriculum into work with theatrical texts and discovery of the processes of scene study. Class size: 15

 

11439

THTR 210   History of Theater II

Jean Wagner

. T . Th .

3:10  - 4:30 pm

OLINLC 210

AART

4 credits   This course is a survey of theater, drama and performance from a  global perspective, from the eighteenth to twenty-first centuries.  We  will begin with 18th century Sentimentalism and the relationship  between theater and the emergence of print culture; then continue with  an examination of Romanticism and other forms of theater as they  relate to nationalism and imperialism in Germany, France and Russia.   We will then explore the relationship between theater and popular entertainment in nineteenth and twentieth century Europe, the United States and Japan, followed by the historical avant-garde and theatrical innovation in Latin America, Eastern Europe and Asia in the twentieth century. We will end with an intercultural study of the relationship between theater and revolution.  The course will emphasize the role of performance as a cultural and political force in society, examine how developments in human communication shaped those in theater, and introduce methodologies employed by today’s theater historians.   Class size: 16

 

11433

THTR 215   Physical Comedy

James Calder

. . . . F

9:30  - 12:30 pm

FISH THTR

PART

2 credits  Beginning with exercises in broad physicality, balance, rhythm, discovery, physical mask and surprise, this class explores what about the individual student  is unique and funny. When we begin to forget what is an appropriate response, and imagine what we would be like if we were never socialized, we begin to discover “the clown” that lives in each of us. By embracing the archetypes of childhood and reclaiming the “internal response” without the diminishing filter of socialization, we start to lose the inhibitions that block us from being purely expressive. This class encourages openness, invention, playfulness, generosity, sensitivity, and courage.  Prerequisite:  Introduction to Acting.  Class size: 16

 

11671

THTR 231B  Voice and Verse

Elizabeth Smith

. . . . F

12:00  - 2:00 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

2 credits  Verse is a significant part of drama and learning to interpret it and speak it is essential for the performer. This course deals with verse from the great poets and dramatists, with an emphasis on Shakespeare. Prerequisite:  THTR 131.  Class size: 12

 

11430

THTR 303   Directing Seminar

Jean Wagner

. . W . .

10:10  - 1:10 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

4 credits This is a studio course that covers the practice of directing from text analysis, ‘table work’, imagining the world of the play, design, casting, space, rehearsal and blocking in different configurations. The work will proceed from scenes to a full-length work. By permission of the instructor.  Class size: 12

 

11438

THTR 307   Advanced Acting

James Calder

. . . . F

1:00  - 4:00 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

3 credits This is a studio acting class where students will explore scenes from challenging plays of varied styles. Extensive rehearsal time outside of class is required. Pre-requisites: Intro to Acting and Scene Study. Maximum enrollment: 12 students.  Class size: 12

 

11434

THTR 308   Advanced Scene Study

Naomi Thornton

. . . Th .

1:30  - 3:30 pm

FISH THTR

PART

3 credits    Scene Technique with work on specific rehearsal tasks and practice of their application. Continued work on the acting instrument, understanding the actor as artist and deepening the physical, emotional, intellectual connection and availability of each actor. Advanced individual exercises, scenes, and monologues from all dramatic literature. Intended for Upper College students, others by permission. Repeatable for credit.  Prerequisite: Introduction to Acting.  Class size: 12

 

11429

THTR 310 A  Survey of Drama: Dramatic Structure And Script Analysis For The Theater

Jonathan Rosenberg

. T . . .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

FISHER PAC

AART

The playwright Jean Anouilh said “Fiction gives life its form.” In the theater playwrights have given form to life in many different ways and in this class we will examine six categories of dramatic structure: linear, episodic, thematic, absurdist, dream and post-modern. By examining the key elements that make up each of  these different structures and analyzing what the experiences and intentions of the playwrights might have been that led them to construct their images of the world in these ways,  we will explore the way one breaks apart a play when the goal is to transform the script into a production. We will do a close reading of plays representing each of these structures  and analyze the implications of structure for an actor, director or designer engaged in interpretation and choice making. Plays to be examined are:  Ibsen’s The Wild Duck; August  Wilson’s Joe Turner’s Come and Gone; Bertolt Brecht’s The Caucasian Chalk Circle; Tony Kushner’s Angels in America Part One: Millennium Approaches; Jean Genet’s The Balcony;  Caryl Churchill’s Top Girls;  Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot; Sam Shepard’s Curse of the Starving Class;  August Strindberg’s A Dream Play; Sarah Kane’s 4:48 Psychosis;  Heiner Muller’s Hamletmachine and Charles L. Mee’s The Trojan Women A Love Story. Class size: 15

 

11431

THTR 310 B  Survey of Drama:Beckett

JoAnne Akalaitis

. . W . .

1:30  - 4:30 pm

FISH THTR

AART

4 credits.  “I can’t go on.  I’ll go on.” Survey of Drama courses study the major styles and periods in drama from a literary, stylistic, and performance perspective, and are at the center of the theater program. They are practical courses, applying text to scene work. All theater majors are expected to take four courses over two years from the Survey of Drama. Periods and some writers covered in this survey: The Greeks; Shakespeare, the Jacobeans, Moliere and the Restoration; Chekhov, Ibsen and Shaw; Buchner and Strindberg, the European experimentalists Brecht and Pirandello; Beckett, Genet and Ionesco; and The Americans, from Eugene O’Neill to Irene Fornes. Class size: 15

 

11426

THTR 318   Visual Imagination of the

Modern Stage

Carol Bailey

M . . . .

1:30  - 4:30 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

4 credits   A course taught by leading designers and directors in the field. It examines the explosive prominence of visionary visual ideas on the stage in the past 30 years, the emergence of a new form of collaboration between directors and designers and the inclusion of the new media on the stage. This course is required for upper-college theater students.   Class size: 15