11499

SPAN 110   Accelerated First Year Spanish

Anna Cafaro

M T W Th .

1:30  - 2:30 pm

OLINLC 210

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   A first-year course designed for the student who has had some prior exposure to Spanish or who has excellent command of another Romance language. All the major topics in grammar will be covered, and the course will provide intensive practice in the four skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing). The course will provide a streamlined review of basic topics in grammar and provide more detail and exercises for advanced topics. The textbook will be supplemented with authentic video material from Spain and 'Latin America. One additional hour per week of practice with the Spanish tutor and a substantial amount of work in the language resource center will also be required. The course will prepare the student for summer language programs abroad or Spanish 201 the following semester. Prospective students must speak with instructor prior to registration.  Class size: 20

 

11493

SPAN 201   Intermediate Spanish I

Melanie Nicholson

M T W Th .

8:50  - 9:50 am

OLINLC 206

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   For students who have completed Spanish 106, 110, or the equivalent (  two or three solid years of high school Spanish). This course is designed to perfect the student's command of all four language skills (speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing). This will be achieved through an intensive grammar review, conversational practice, reading of modern Spanish texts, writing simple compositions, and language lab work. Prospective students must speak with instructor prior to registration.   Class size: 20

 

11495

SPAN 202   Intermediate Spanish II

Nicole Caso

M T W . .

. . . Th .

3:10  - 4:10 pm

OLINLC 120

OLINLC 115

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   This course continues refining and perfecting the student’s mastery of speaking, reading, comprehending, and writing Spanish.  Advanced study of grammar is supplemented by a video series and authentic readings on a wide variety of topics related to Spanish and Latin American history, literature, music, and art.  Current topics in culture such as the Latin American military dictatorships or issues surrounding the Hispanic presence in the United States will be discussed.  In addition to shorter readings, such as excerpts from Don Quixote and indigenous Mexican poetry, students may read a short modern novel.  Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or permission of instructor.  Prospective students must speak with instructor prior to registration. Class size: 20

 

11943

LIT 2027   Introduction to Latin American Poetry

Melanie Nicholson

. T . Th .

1:30  - 2:50 pm

OLIN 304

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   Poetry in Latin America has often followed a much more ideological, “popular,” and emotionally accessible trajectory than poetry in North America. This course will trace the development of that poetry rooted in the pueblo—as well as its avant-garde, hermetic, or philosophical counterpart—from the Colonial period to the present day.  Certain early figures such as Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (Mexico) will be examined.  However, the majority of the course will focus on twentieth-century poetry, with particular attention paid to Nobel Prize winners Pablo Neruda and Octavio Paz. Class discussions, while emphasizing a close reading of the primary texts, will also examine those texts within historical, social, and political contexts.  Conducted in English, with an optional tutorial for those students wishing to read and discuss the poetry in Spanish. Class size: 18

 

11492

SPAN 220   The Hispanic Presence in US

Melanie Nicholson

M . W . .

10:10  - 11:30 am

OLINLC 118

FLLC/DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights, LAIS, SRE   This multidisciplinary course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the historical, social, political, legal, and linguistic issues surrounding the Hispanic presence in the United States.  It will also give advanced Spanish students an opportunity to utilize and improve their communication skills and broaden their cultural perspectives.  The first four weeks of the semester will be devoted to instruction in ESL (English as a Second Language) pedagogy.  At the end of this period, Bard students will be matched with Spanish speakers in the surrounding community and will begin providing instruction in conversational English.  For the remainder of the semester, students will meet in seminar format to discuss course readings.  Guest lecturers, both from within the Bard faculty and from other community agencies, will be invited to address students on particular issues, including the history of Hispanic immigration in the US (with a focus on New York state), economic issues regarding immigrants and migrants, particularly as they relate to the Hudson Valley in the past decade; political conflicts arising out of illegal immigration; legislation and the role of the INS; attitudes toward Hispanics (stereotyping; conflation of racial, linguistic, and class issues in relations among Hispanics, other minority groups, and the English-speaking majority); and issues surrounding bilingualism.  Conducted in Spanish and English.  Students must have completed Spanish 202 or its equivalent, and must  have approval of instructor prior to registration. Class size: 15

 

11497

SPAN 235   The Moral of the Story

Gabriela Carrion

. . W . F

8:30  - 9:50 am

OLINLC 210

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   Stories in Medieval Spanish literature often claim to teach rather than entertain the reader. Even in these early examples, however, it is not always clear whether the “moral” of the story is lost to the sheer pleasure of the text. Often, the most compelling stories do not possess clear-cut lessons, but seduce the reader through their fictions. Part of this seduction may, in fact, consist of the rather ambiguous “morality” these stories convey. As early as the fourteenth century, don Juan Manuel suggests that by adding more “sugar or honey” (açúcar o miel) to a story, its lesson becomes more palatable. The tension between didactic and aesthetic imperatives thus provides a framework with which to examine a wide range of short stories and to think about the function of art in general. Some of the subjects we will explore in this course include the relationship between the storyteller and the audience; the difference between reading aloud and silent reading; variations of the short story including fables, enxiemplos, novellas, and microrelatos. Some of the writers include don Juan Manuel, Miguel de Cervantes, Mariano Joséde Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, Pío Baroja, Ignacio Aldecoa, and Ana María Matute. Class size: 15

 

11496

SPAN 302   Introduction to Latin American Literature

Nicole Caso

M . W . .

1:30  - 2:50 pm

RKC 200

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   This course serves as an introduction to the interpretation of literary texts from Latin America.  It covers a broad range historically—from pre-Conquest times to the present—and presents all literary genres, including poetry, short stories, novels, essays, and plays.  This course is intended to prepare students for more advanced and specialized courses in Hispanic literature.  A great deal of attention is paid to the development of critical skills, both verbally and in writing.  Class size: 15

 

 

11498

SPAN 344   Love, Honor, and Power in the Spanish Drama

Gabriela Carrion

. . W . F

10:10  - 11:30 am

OLINLC 210

FLLC

Cross-listed: LAIS  This course takes its title from Pedro Calderón de la Barca’s first drama, Amor, honor, y poder, a title that summarizes some of the most urgent concerns of Spain’s early modern period.  We will focus our attention on the dramatic works of this period, including full-length works that have become an undisputed part of the canon as well as the more subversive one-act plays or interludes.  We will also explore the various sites of performance, including the corral de comedias, the court, the convent, and public plaza. The drama represents a privileged site of expression during this period of political and economic crisis, and to this day critics remain divided as to its role within Spanish society. Did these plays serve to uphold the prevailing order, or did they put this order into serious question? How did the leading playwrights of the day transform the stage into a space in which to reenact the anxieties, fears, and fantasies of their society? Why did the theater enjoy such unprecedented success precisely at the moment of one of Spain’s worst crises? We will consider these and other questions in the works of Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Juan Ruiz de Alarcón, Pedro Calderón de la Barca, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Conducted in Spanish.  Class size: 15