By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case.  In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project. 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

 

College & Community Ensembles

 

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble one or two credits may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

Schedule for scholarship auditions will be announced.

 

11564

MUS 104   Bard College Orchestra

Teresa Cheung

. T . . .

7:30  - 10:00 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. Auditions will be held on Tuesday January 25th, 2011 from 6:00 pm until 7:30pm for new members. Please call to set up appt., 845-758-7091. * First Orchestra rehearsal will be on Tuesday January 25th, 2011 from 7:30 pm until 10:00 pm in Sosnoff Theatre. * (Please be prepared to play two pieces—one slower and lyrical, and one faster.) Class size: 30

 

11565

MUS 105   Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30  - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

First rehearsal will be on Tuesday February 1st, 2011.  Class size: 20

 

11566

MUS 106   Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . . . .

 

.

PART

Class size: 18

 

11567

MUS 108B   Ensemble: Contemporary

Blair McMIllen

TBA

TBA

BLM HALL

PART

Class size: 12

 

11568

MUS 108D   Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:40  - 6:40 pm

.

PART

2 credits. Auditions will be held by appointment for new members.  First rehearsal will be on Tuesday February 1st, 2011.  Class size: 35

 

11569

MUS 108H   Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Mercedes Dujunco

M . . . .

7:00  - 9:00 pm

.

PART

Class size: 22

 

11570

MUS 108I   Ensemble: Electro-Acoustic

Marina Rosenfeld

. . . Th .

4:40 – 6:40 pm

BLM N210

PART

Class size: 14

 

11571

MUS 108N   Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:40  - 6:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 12

 

Music Courses

 

11572

MUS 127   Intro to Western Music for

Non-Majors: History of the Keyboard

Peter Laki

. T . Th .

1:30  - 2:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

This course will assume no previous knowledge about music.  It will introduce students to the history of Western music through an exploration of the keyboard instruments. (organ, harpsichord, piano) and their evolution over the centuries.  Students will also become acquainted with some of the great keyboard performers of the past and the present.  There will be a reading list, three quizzes and a term paper.  Class size: 20

 

11573

MUS 172   Jazz Harmony II

John Esposito

M . W . .

10:10  - 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

Part II - This course will include acquisition of the basic skills that make up the Foundation of all jazz styles.  We will also study the Jazz Language from the BEBOP ERA up to the 60’s. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors. Class size: 15

 

11574

MUS 202   Music Theory II

Kyle Gann

M T W Th F*

1:30  - 2:50 pm

BLM N217

PART

Continuation of Music Theory I, introduction to harmony, various seventh chords, secondary dominants, basics of modulation, four-part writing and voice-leading.  End result: ability to write a hymn, song or brief movement of tonal music.  Theoretical work will be complemented by weekly ear-training labs focused on developing the ability to sing and recognize secondary dominants, modulations, and so on. Prerequisite: Music Theory I or equivalent (knowledge of scales and keys).  This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.  +Note: course will meet 4 days weekly, to be determined. Two days cover theory, 2 days of lab.)Class size: 25

 

11575

MUS 211   Jazz in Literature I

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:10  - 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies  This course presents some of the short stories and poems by Rudolph Fisher, Langston Hughes, Ann Petry, and Julio Cortazar. The text used in this section is ‘Hot and Cool’ by Marcela Briton and the ‘Harlem Renaissance Reader’, edited by David Lewis.  Class size: 16

 

11576

MUS 225   Introduction to Conducting

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

3:10  - 4:30 pm

BLM N217

PART

This course will introduce the students to the basic elements of conducting.  While the development of the physical gesture and rehearsal techniques will be the primary goals, we will also work on score reading, ear training, instrumental transposition, and historical performance practice.  Repertoire will include both orchestral and choral repertoire.  Evaluation will be based on the individual’s improvement in gesture and rehearsal technique.  Prerequisites for the course are the successful completion of Music Theory I and II or equivalent.  This fulfills music theory requirements.   Class size: 10

 

11577

MUS 231   From “Honest Courtesans” to Singing Nuns: Women & Music in Early Modern Italy

Frederick Hammond

. T . Th .

10:10  - 11:30 am

OLIN 104

AART

Women as composers, lyricists, and performers of both sacred and secular music in Italy from the late Renaissance to the orchestras and choruses of Venetian female orphanages in the eighteenth century. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 15

 

11578

MUS 232   Twentieth Century Masters: Schoenberg, Stravinsky & Shostakovich

Frederick Hammond

M . W . .

10:10  - 11:30 am

OLIN 104

AART

The work of these three composers encapsulates much of the history, techniques, and aesthetics of twentieth-century Western art music.  Arnold Schoenberg (1874- 1951) carried Wagnerian harmony to what he considered its logical conclusion, the destruction of tonality.  Igor Stravinsky (1882- 1971), the internationally successful product of Russian imperial culture, assimilated everything from Tschaikovskian romanticism to serial technique.  The tormented Dimitri Shostakovich ( 1906- 1975) spent most of his career trying to balance his own creative expression with the demands of the Stalinist government.  We will consider a core of major works (including an opera) by each composer: Schoenberg’s Verklarte Nacht (1899), Pierrot Lunaire (1912), Suite for Piano, Op. 25 (1923), Moses und Aron (1930- 32), and the String Trio, Op. 45 (1946); Stravinsky’s Sacre de Printemps (1913), Les Noces (1923), Apollon Musagete (1928), The Rake’s Progress (1951), and Agon (1957); Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth of Mdzensk (1932), Symphonies 2 (1927), 13 (“Babiy Yar, “ 1962), and 15 (1971), and the String Quartet no. 15 (1974).  Musical training is useful but not required.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors. Not available for on-line registration. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.   Class size: 15

 

11579

MUS 238   History and Literature of

Electronic and Computer Music

Richard Teitelbaum

. . W . .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

BLM N119

AART

Related interest:  STS   In the 1920’s, a number of new electronic instruments such as the Theremin, the Ondes Martenot and the Trautonium were invented, and a number of composers, including Hindemith and Messiaen, composed new works for them.  After the invention of  magnetic recording tape in the late 40’s electronic music became an enterprise that was produced in special studios and fixed on tape for later playback. Starting around 1960, John Cage and David Tudor began experimental performances with such works as Cartridge Music (1960), Variations II and other pieces that reintroduced  the live performer to the electronic medium.  Many composers, such as Mumma, Behrman, Lucier, Ashley, Stockhausen, Nono, and Boulez, as well as collective improvisationally-based groups such as AMM Music in London, and Musica Elettronica Viva in Rome soon followed suit.  During the 60’s and 70’s, with the advent of smaller and the more personal synthesizers invented by Moog, Buchla and others, the field of live electronic music became a practical reality. Some ten years later, a similar sequence of events took place with regard to computer music, where the large mainframes of the 50’s and 60’s were superseded by the PC revolution of the late 70’s and 80’s.  This was followed by the more recent  development of the laptop that has enabled performers to carry powerful, portable computers on stage. This course will trace these developments, examine the literature of the field, encourage live performances of “classic” pieces, and the creation and performance of new compositions and improvisations. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken in conjunction with Electro-Acoustic Ensemble.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 15

 

11721

MUS 254B  Pronunciation & Diction for Singers II

TBA

. T . Th .

10:10  - 11:30 am

BARD HALL

AART/DIFF

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature.  The fall semester will be devoted to the Italian and French languages, the spring to German, English, and Latin.  Through songs, arias, and choral literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language.  While it is geared towards singers and collaborative pianists, the course is also useful for other instrumentalists and students seeking to refine pronunciation and accent.  Grading will be based on a series of quizzes and two exams, including the preparation and performance of one song per language.  Ability to read music is not required.  No previous knowledge of the languages is required. 

 

11580

MUS 265   Literature and Language

of Music II

Christopher Gibbs

M . W . .

11:50  - 1:10 pm

BLM N217

AART

A survey of selected musical works composed in the 19th and 20th centuries.  Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits.  In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams.  As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected.  This course is primarily designed for music majors including sophomores. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  It is not required that students have taken the first semester (Music 264), which covered music from the Middle Ages to 1800.  Class size: 22

 

11581

MUS 266C C2  Jazz Repertory: BEBOP Masters

John Esposito

M . W . .

1:30  - 2:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

This performance based course is a survey of the principal composers and performers of the BEBOP Era.  Musicians included are Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro, Bud Powell, Max Roach and others.  The course will include readings, recorded music and films.  The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony I or permission of instructor. This can be taken as a companion course with Jazz Harmony II. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 15

 

11582

MUS 312   Masterworks of Music

Peter Laki

. T . . .

4:40  - 7:00 pm

BLM N210

AART

This course parallels Literature & Language of Music, but will focus on just a handful of pieces, exploring those pieces in great depth from a number of different viewpoints.  Students will read a substantial amount of specialized literature on each chosen work.  There will be two oral exams, one at mid-term and one at the end of the semester, where students will have to demonstrate familiarity with the works we have discussed and respond to the issues raised in the readings.  In addition, students will write a term paper on a work of their choice from the time period covered, applying the approaches and methodologies learned in class to some new material. The following works will be studied in the class: Dufay: “L’homme arme” Mass-Josquin:  “L’homme arme” Mass (super voces musicales)- Palestrina: “L’homme arme” Mass; Monteverdi:  The Cornonation of Poppea; Bach:  Six Brandenburg Concertos; Beethoven:  String Quartet in B flat, op 130 and Grosse Fuge, op. 133. Readings will include: Wright, Craig.  The Maze and the Warrior;  Rosand , Ellen.  Monteverdi’s Last Operas:  A Venetian Trilogy; Marissen, Michael:  The Social and Religious Designs of J. S. Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos;  Winter, Robert and Robert Martin, eds. The Beethoven Quartet Companion.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 16

 

11652

MUS 317   Voice, Body, Machine: Women Artists & the Evolution of the Composer-Performer

Marina Rosenfeld

. . . Th .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

BLM N119

AART

Cross-listed:  Gender & Sexuality Studies   This class explores the works and legacy of a diverse group of artists, mostly female, whose hybrid, often interdisciplinary practices challenged conventional ideas of embodiment, performance, expression and technology, and redefined the fields of experimental and electronic music during the last half-century.  Course work includes critical writing as well as creative compositional and/or performance work.  Artists considered include Pauline Oliveros, Yoko Ono, Joan La Barbara, Alison Knowles, Maryanne Amacher, Eliane Radigue, Diamanda Galas, Laetitia Sonami, Pamela Z. Terre Thaemlitz, Slits, Kembra Pfahler, Kaffe Matthews, Fe-Matt, Sachiko M, and others.

 

11583

MUS 322A   Charles Ives: Concord Sonata

Kyle Gann

. . W . .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

This seminar will be an in-depth examination and analysis of one of the 20th century’s most extraordinary piano works:  the Piano Sonata No. 2, “Concord, Mass., 1840 – 1860”  by Charles Ives (1874-1954).  Completed by 1915 but not performed until 1938, the piece anticipated many new currents in the European avant-garde and gave evidence of a fully formed American aesthetic, though it is still arguably Romantic in its ambitious attempt to state a life-philosophy in music.  We will read and discuss essays by the dedicatees of the sonata’s movements (Emerson, Hawthorne, Bronson and Louis May Alcott, Thoreau) and speculate about the music’s relation to its models.  We will run through Ives’s biography and relate his other works to this one, noting his frequent borrowings from piece to piece.  Most importantly, we will compare Ives’s sketches for the work to its two published versions, with an eye toward expanding our understanding of his creative process, which was so atypical for his time.  Prerequisite for the course is any second-year music theory course, and the music major can receive either music history or music  theory credit depending on the subject matter of his or her mid-term and final papers.   Class size: 10

 

11584

MUS 335   Jazz: The Freedom Principle III

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies, American Studies  The third part of a four-part course in Jazz History. This section is a study of modern jazz from 1937 to 1950. Emphasis will focus on modern musicians such as Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, Dizzy Gillispie and Max Roach. We will examine the solo and combo style of these musicians. Also we will examine how the music developed from Swing to Bebop. This will be illustrated with recordings and films. This course employs a cultural approach designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music through the 40’s, such as World War II, Jim Crow laws in the south and the recording industry strike. Classroom discussions will focus on the different styles of each musician. Students will be evaluated by written assignments and oral presentations. This course reaches out to anyone with an interest in Jazz and would like to get a better understanding of the music and its effect on our culture in the last 100 years.  Enrollment limited.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 16

 

11585

MUS 345   Introductory Psychoacoustics

Robert Bielecki

. . . Th .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

BLM N110

AART

"Reality is a myth, perception is what matters".  This course will examine auditory perception and hearing  and serve as an introduction to how hearing works. The first half of the semester begins with a description of the physiology and function of the ear and how we process auditory information.   Some topics include: perception of pitch, loudness, location, auditory illusions, critical bands, masking, threshold of hearing, hearing loss, and audiometry.   The second half of the semester will focus on sound localization and the technologies used in spatialization and 3-D audio. We will explore auditory localization cues, HRTF, binaural recording, spatial audio synthesis, sound for virtual realities and immersive environments. This course should be of particular interest to anyone involved in music and audio technology.  This course fulfills music theory requirements.  Class size: 14

 

11586

MUS 346   Interactive Performance

and Composition

Robert Bielecki

. T . . .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

MAX/MSP is an object oriented graphical programming environment for algorithmic music composition, interactivity, live processing, multimedia and more.  This course covers beginning, intermediate, and advanced methods of using MAX/MSP.  This will be a hands-on course with examples from artist’s work, several programming assignments and a final project.  Knowledge of computer programming and MIDI is not necessary, but would be helpful. This fulfills music theory requirements.  Class size: 16

 

11587

MUS 352   Workshop: Electronic, Electroacoustic and Computer Music Composition I

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

BLM N110

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing work as computer programs, digital or analog recordings and scores for live electronic realization.  These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members.  Installations and mixed media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Xenakis, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor. This fulfills music theory requirements.  Class size: 10

 

11588

MUS 356 B  Arranging Techniques for

Jazz II

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00  - 9:00 pm

BLM N211

 

This class will focus on the various techniques used in jazz ensemble writing from sextet to big band ensembles.  Classic drop-two voicings and tertiary approaches will be covered as well as more contemporary cluster, quartal and line part writing.  The various approaches to textural issues that arise in each particular instrumentation will be examined as well as various approaches to section writing.  Final projects ranging from Sextet to Big Band will be recorded or performed live at the end of the semester.  This is an advanced seminar class for moderated music majors.  Prerequisites are Jazz Composition I and II or the permission of the instructor. Class size: 12

 

11589

MUS 357 C  Special Topics in Ethnomusicology: Music and Migration

Mercedes Dujunco

. T . Th .

10:10  - 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Anthropology Each offering in this course series will focus on one of several different topics and its related issues that are presently of interest among scholars in both the humanities and social science disciplines and explore it ethnomusicologically in relation to the music culture(s) of a particular country or region. Through a combination of lectures and discussions based on key readings in the literature and audiovisual materials on the given topic and the music culture(s) being explored during a semester, the course will allow students to consider a topic in depth through a musical lens and draw significant insights through application of relevant theories to specific area case studies.For Spring 2011, we will explore the topic of music and migration in the context of various diasporic music cultures. Students will gain an understanding of the processes through which music and music-related phenomena move beyond their traditional cultural settings as part of migratory movements by people in specific historical periods and in the present time, and the various conditions in which these take place. Among the issues that would be explored would be the changes that some musical genres and practices undergo in the process of being transplanted into different places and contexts, particularly in the present age of globalization with its concurrent transnational flows of people, objects, and ideas. Class size: 20

 

11590

MUS 366D   Advanced Contemporary Jazz Technique IV

John Esposito

. . . Th .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

This course will focus on strategies for improvisation without predetermined chord structures or rhythmic frameworks and on methods for shaping performances spontaneously.  We will also explore collaboration with artists from other disciplines such as dance, spoken word and visual arts. This class is open to moderated upper college students who have successfully completed advanced contemporary Jazz techniques A & B. This fulfills music theory requirements. Class size: 15

 

Music Workshops

 

11591

MUS WKSHA   Workshop: Composition

For Performers

Joan Tower

M . . . .

4:40  - 7:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class and then  eventually to professionals(the  Da Capo Players) who give a concert of some of that music at the end  of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should email Prof. Tower prior to registration to determine eligibility. Class size: 18

 

11592

MUS WKSHB   Workshop: Performance

Class

Luis Garcia-Renart / Blair McMillen

. T . Th .

. . W . .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

4:40  - 7:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration.  Students choose one of the three sessions.  Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart  by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration. Class size: 20

 

11593

MUS WKSHG   Workshop: Vocal & Voice

Arthur Burrows

. . W . .

10:10  - 12:10 pm

BDH

PART

 Music of Stephen Foster, Cole Porter, George Gershwin & Leonard Bernstein Class size: 12

 

11594

MUS WKSHL   Workshop: Opera Workshop

Rufus Muller / Ilka LoMonaco

. . W . .

1:30  - 3:50 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits   Work is to be decided.  For more information see Professor Muller.   Contact  Prof. Müller by email: rumu2000@earthlink.net to arrange an audition before registration. Class size: 16

 

11595

MUS WKSHM   Workshop: That Ain't Opera!

Rufus Muller

M . . . .

3:00  - 5:20 pm

BDH

PART

Verdi, Donizetti, Bellini –famous for their operas- also wrote songs, as did other earlier composers of Italian opera, such as Handel and Caccini.

This performance-oriented course is designed for pianists and singers interested in developing ways of communicating vividly with an audience, as well as providing guidance on Italian diction. Contact Prof. Muller by email: rumu2000@earthlink.net to arrange an audition before registration. Class size: 16

 

11598

MUS WKSHV   Chinese Music Ensemble

Mercedes Dujunco

. T . Th .

4:40  - 6:00 pm

BLM 117

PART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies   2 credits.  A beginner's workshop for students interested in learning to play Chinese folk music through performance on instruments of the "silk and bamboo" (Chinese string and wind instruments) category. Students acquire basic skills on one of several instruments that may include the di (bamboo transverse flute), the erhu (2-stringed fiddle), zheng (21-string plucked board zither), yangqin (hammered dulcimer), pipa (short-necked pear-shaped plucked lute), and sanxian (long-necked 3-stringed plucked lute), with the goal of eventually playing together in ensemble.  Class size: 15

 

11596

MUS WKSP4   Workshop:Jazz

Improvisation II

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:40  - 7:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  This class is structured as a continuation of Jazz Improvisation I. The goal will be to gain mastery over all of the basic scales used in traditional jazz improvisation, and to attain the ability to improvise over basic two-five patterns and simple modal progressions. Prerequisite:  Jazz Improvisation Workshop I, or consent of the instructor. Class size: 16

 

11597

MUS WKSP7   Jazz Vocal Workshop

John Esposito

M . . . .

4:40  - 6:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 16

 

SPECIAL PROJECTS: Designed for Music Majors only, to pursue individual or group projects. Students should contact the professor for arrangements.

 

11600

MUS PROJ EL  Special Projects

Erica Lindsay

By arrangement

 

.

PART

 

11599

MUS PROJ JB  Special Projects

James Bagwell

By arrangement

 

.

PART

 

11603

MUS PROJ JT  Special Projects

Joan Tower

By arrangement

 

.

PART

 

11602

MUS PROJ KG  Special Projects

Kyle Gann

By arrangement

 

.

PART

 

11601

MUS PROJ LGR  Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

By arrangement

 

.

PART

 

11604

MUS PROJ TB  Special Projects

Thurman Barker

By arrangement

 

.

PART

 

PRIVATE MUSIC LESSONS

All matriculated Bard students may be eligible to receive academic credit and scholarships for private instrumental or voice lessons. The choice of teachers is to be worked out on a case by case basis by the student and the Music Department. The teacher and student arrange payments and schedule.

Requirements for academic credit:
1) Registered, matriculated Bard College student.

2) Assignment of grade, based on performance in a departmental concert or audition by an evaluating panel at the end of each semester.
3) Participation in a music course that provides the student a larger forum of music making. A waiver of this requirement is possible in certain circumstances and is subject to Music Department review.

Credits awarded for the courses:
     Lessons:  1 or 2 credits
     Performance class:  2 credits
     Ensembles:    1 or 2 credits  (check description)
     Chorus:  1 credit

Requirements for scholarship:
1) Selection for scholarship by departmental evaluating panel, either through performance in a departmental concert or through audition.
2) Registration in an ensemble or performance class.


Maximum of  12 lessons @ $30.00 per lesson (towards lesson cost) available, applied as credit to student’s Bard account.