11480

GER 102 A  Beginning German II

Florian Becker

M T W Th .

12:00  - 1:00 pm

OLINLC 206

FLLC

The continuation of GER 101, this course lays a foundation for proficiency in oral and written communication. Class time is devoted to interactive tasks that develop communicative competence. The emphasis falls on oral production, strategies for understanding oral and written discourse, vocabulary acquisition, and on expressing your ideas in writing. Readings and audiovisual materials convey what life is like in the German-speaking countries today. Class size: 18

 

11483

GER 102 B  Beginning German II

Stephanie Kufner

M T W Th .

12:00  - 1:00 pm

OLINLC 210

FLLC

See above. Class size: 18

 

11481

GER 306   German Drama & Capitalism

Florian Becker

M . W . .

3:10  - 4:30 pm

OLINLC 118

FLLC

In the 1750s, as a new “middle class” began to emerge throughout Europe, the genre of drama and the institution of theater began to assume an unprecedented importance in German literature, philosophy and society. In this course we will seek to understand why and how this happened. Why did Lessing, Goethe and Schiller believe that their audiences needed the theater to understand themselves as “human beings” and to develop as autonomous agents? What groups or interests did their dramatic projects sideline, and how? How were their projects challenged or transformed by the work of such writers as Lenz, Kleist, Hofmannsthal, Brecht, Toller, Müller and others? All classroom discussion and primary readings will be in German.  Class size: 15

 

11414

GER 421   The Experience of the Foreign

in German Literature

Franz Kempf

. T . Th .

10:10  - 11:30 am

OLINLC 118

FLLC

This course will examine representations of foreignness in modern German literature and opera (e.g., Lessing, Mozart, Novalis, Heine, Kafka, Frisch), in contemporary films (Hark Bohm, R.W. Fassbinder, Fatih Akin), and in works of nonnative Germans writing in Germany today (Yoko Tawada, Aras Ören, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Rafik Schami).  Attempting to combine aesthetic appreciation with cultural critique, the course will focus on issues such as multiculturalism, homogeneity, and xenophobia.  Its goal is to enable students to approach cultural difference, in Claire Kramsch's words, "in a spirit of ethnographic inquiry rather than in a normative or judgmental way." Conducted in  German. Class size: 15