11390

BIO 114†† Biology of Non-infectious Disease

John Ferguson

††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. . W . F

M . . . .

1:30- 3:30 pm

1:30- 4:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 112

SCI

While both morbidity and mortality from infectious disease declined steadily during the 20th century in developed nations, they remained constant for noninfectious diseases. Students examine the reasons for this failure to deal more effectively with these conditions as they study various specific diseases. Examples include inherited diseases such as sickle-cell anemia, Huntington's disease, and cystic fibrosis; endocrine disorders such as acromegaly; nutrional disorders such as vitamin and mineral deficiencies; therapeutic drug addiction and toxicities; various poisonings such as plant intoxications and rattlesnake envenomation; cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarctions and cerebrovascular accidents; neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease; allergies; and autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, and diabetes mellitus. Many of the readings are relatively nontechnical case histories, but the biology underlying each condition is thoroughly developed. This course is of interest to those focusing on a career in the health professions, but is also designed to provide liberal arts students with some degree of medical literacy in these health issues. The laboratory portion introduces students to human physiology as it relates to disease. Prerequisites: experience in high school biology and chemistry. Class size: 20

 

11391

BIO 142†† Organismal Biology

William Maple

††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab A:

††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab B:

. . W . F

. . . . F

. . . Th .

10:10- 12:10 pm

1:30- 3:30 pm

1:30- 3:30 pm

RKC 103

SCI

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies, Global & Intíl StudiesAn introduction to organismal biology and ecology, primarily for those who intend to continue in biology; also open to interested students not majoring in science. Topics include population genetics, evolution, vertebrate embryology and anatomy, and animal phylogeny, taxonomy, and ecology. Biology 142 may be taken before Biology 141, if necessary. Students majoring in biology are strongly encouraged to enroll in Chemistry 142 concurrently. Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic. Class size: 40

 

11392

BIO 144†† Biostatistics

Philip Johns

††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. T . . .

. . . Th .

3:10- 6:00 pm

3:10- 6:00 pm

RKC 102

MATC

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies, Global & Intíl Studies†††This course introduces students to the statistical methods biologists use to describe and compare data. Students will learn methods are appropriate for different types of data. Topics covered include elementary probability and statistics, characteristics of frequency distributions, hypothesis testing, contingency tests, correlation and regression analysis, different ways to compare means, nonparametric tests, and an introduction to multivariate tests. This course is intended for sophomore and junior biology majors, although it is open to students of all years.  One objective of the course is to provide biology majors the statistical background they need to analyze data for their own senior research; biology students should take this course before their senior year, if possible. Notice, though, that the topics in this course are applicable to many advanced courses. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: passing score on the Mathematics Diagnostic and at least one introductory biology course. Class size: 20

 

11393

BIO 147†† Conservation Biology

Cathy Collins

††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. . W . F

M . . . .

10:10- 11:30 am

1:30- 4:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 114

SCI

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies In this course students will investigate ways in which fundamental principles of ecology, evolution, and genetics can be applied toward conserving biodiversity. First, we will explore global patterns of biodiversity, focusing on current threats to diversity and the ecosystem consequences of species extinctions. We will also examine the importance of maintaining genetic diversity within and among populations, and the genetic consequences of small populations, such as inbreeding depression. Finally, we will study population dynamics and species interactions and, ultimately, synthesize our knowledge from genes to ecosystems as we evaluate potential solutions for meeting conservation challenges. Labs will provide opportunities to use the tools and research approaches that ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and systematists use for solving practical problems in conservation biology. (Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic, and experience in high school biology. Class size: 20

 

11394

BIO 151†† From Genes to Traits

Michael Tibbetts

††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. . W . .

. . . . F

1:30- 4:30 pm

1:30- 4:30 pm

RKC 111

RKC 112

SCI

Cross-listed: Global & Intíl Studies; Science, Technology & SocietyThis course takes an introductory look at the relationships between genetics, environment, and biochemistry. It is intended for students with a strong interest in science and is appropriate for biology majors. The course will begin with an examination of heredity in both classical and modern molecular contexts. It will then focus on the relationships between genes and proteins, and the complex biochemical interactions that produce a phenotype. The course will culminate in a discussion of the ways in which the environment interacts with multiple genes to influence complex traits, for example schizophrenia, and the modern methods applied to the problem of identifying the genetic components of these traits. The laboratory will provide an opportunity to examine some of the principles discussed in the lecture in more detail and to become acquainted with some of the methodologies and instrumentation found in a modern biology laboratory.Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic, and experience in high school biology and chemistry. Class size: 20

 

11395

BIO 201†† Eukaryotic Genetics

Michael Tibbetts

M . . . .

. . W . .

9:30- 11:30 am

8:30- 11:30 am

RKC 111/112

RKC 111/113

SCI

Cross-listed:Cognitive Science, Global & Intíl Studies†† This course is an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance and the generation of diversity in eukaryotic organisms.This course takes a modern approach to the study of genetics in which classical ideas about genotype, phenotype and inheritance are integrated into the modern molecular and genomic understanding of the processes involved in the generation of diversity.In addition to discussions of the molecular mechanisms involved in DNA replication,recombination, the generation and repair of mutations, and the relationship between genotype and phenotype, special consideration is given to our understanding of the processes involved in generating population-level variation in complex traits and how this understanding can help us identify the myriad genetic and non-genetic factors influencing these traits.The laboratory consists of a semester long project involving the genetic manipulation of a model organismís genome to address one or more topics in the course.†† Prerequisite: One biology course at the 140 level or higher.Class size: 20

 

11396

BIO 202†† Ecology and Evolution

Felicia Keesing

. . W . .

. . . . F

8:30- 11:30 am

9:30- 11:30 am

RKC 114/115

SCI

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies†† This core course for biology majors is an introduction to the general principles of ecology and evolution that, with genetics, form the core of biological understanding. In addition to studying foundational ideas in both ecology and evolution, we will explore modern topics at the boundary between these two areas. We will consider, for example, how genetic variation among individual organisms can influence ecological interactions, and how these interactions can influence fitness. We will focus on a mechanistic understanding of processes, using model-building to inform that understanding.Prerequisite: One biology course at the 140 level or higher. Class size: 20

 

11397

BIO 208†† Biology Seminar

Catherine O'Reilly

. . . Th .

11:50- 1:10 pm

RKC 103

 

1 creditThis course will provide students with broad exposure to biology through the biology visiting speaker seminar series. Students will hear about the wide-ranging research interests of invited biologists and have opportunities to interact informally with them. The course is graded Pass/Fail and students are responsible for short follow-up assignments for at least 80% of the talks. Recommended for all biology majors and other interested students. Class size: 60

 

11399

BIO 310†† Prokaryotic & Viral Genetics

John Ferguson

††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. T . Th .

. . . Th .

8:30- 10:30 am

1:30- 6:00 pm

RKC 102

RKC 112

 

This course considers biological inheritance in prokaryotes (bacteria) and their viruses (bacteriophages). Lectures alternate with student presentations of fundamental papers in chronological order. Topics include mutagenesis and repair, plasmids, conjugation, transformation, intemperate and temperate phages, transduction, transposition and nonhomologous recombination,homologous recombination, and the regulation of gene expression. Laboratory work provides practical experience in the topics covered. Offered in alternate spring semesters. Prerequisite: BIO 201, BIO 303, and CHEM 201-202. Class size: 20

 

11398

BIO 313†† Animal Behavior

Philip Johns

†††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

M . W . .

M . . . .

1:30- 2:50 pm

8:30- 11:30 am

RKC 115

RKC 114

SCI

Cross listed:Cognitive ScienceThe aim of this course is to examine animal behavior from a biological, and especially an evolutionary, point of view.Students will explore the causes and consequences of behaviors such as: foraging and predation; migration; anti-predator behaviors; and social behaviors such as communication; mating behavior; cooperation; and altruism.Students will be exposed to a mix of lecture and discussion of the recent primary literature. Students will lead some of the discussions.One major aim of the course is for students to become familiar with the methodology of animal behavior, and students must participate in at least one major field trip.Students will design and carry out their own animal behavior research over the course of the semester.This course is intended for advanced biology majors. Biology 201 and 202 are required; Biostatistics and Advanced Evolution are both useful to this course but not required.Please ask the instructor if you have any questions about your eligibility.Class size: 12

 

11660

BIO 412Ecosystems Ecology/ Biogeochemistry

Catherine OíReilly

. T . Th .

8:30- 9:50 am

RKC 115

SCI

Our planet is basically a closed system, and cycles of certain elements dictate life-determining processes. The nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon cycles are of particular interest in understanding patterns of life on earth. At different time scales, geological, biological, and chemical processes all play important roles mediating the availability of these nutrients. We will examine how interactions between biological processes (like primary productivity and food web interactions) and geological processes (like rock weathering) influence nutrient availability and long-term climate. With this understanding, we will also investigate how various human activities are affecting these cycles and the implications for these impacts. Prerequisites: Chemistry 142 and two Biology courses, at least one at the 200 level. Class size: 15

 

11401

BIO 415†† AdvancedSeminar in

Community Ecology

Cathy Collins

. . . Th .

1:30- 3:30 pm

RKC 115

SCI

2 credits What is an ecological niche? How do niches influence the outcome of species interactions and ultimately, community diversity? The concept of niche has been a cornerstone of ecological thought, as well as a focal point of controversy among ecologists seeking to understand how communities are assembled in nature. Using the niche as our conceptual thread, we will explore the role that species interactions, species traits, and evolutionary history play in determining composition and diversity of communities. In this weekly seminar, we will read both classic and recent papers from the primary literature, exploring the many different approaches ecologists have taken in their quest to understand how species coexist.Class size: 15

 

11400

BIO 419†† Stem Cells

Craig Jude

M . . . .

3:10- 5:10 pm

RKC 200

 

2 credits Stem cells are one of the centers of controversy for the scientific world.  Stem cells range from adult stem cells that can only normally repopulate a limited subset of cell types, to embryonic stem cells, which give rise to all the cells of the adult organism.  We will discuss the biology of the various types of stem cells and investigate their possible implications in treatment of disease as well delve into the ethical concerns about the use of stem cells.  The class will center around analysis of the current primary literature, as well as examine the classical literature that founded the field.Class size: 15