11435

THTR 101 A  Introduction to Acting

Lynn Hawley

M . . . .

12:00 -3:00 pm

FISHER

PART

3 credits  This course, intended for prospective theater majors, focuses on accessing the beginning actor’s imagination and creative energy.  Using theater games, movement work, and improvisational techniques, the intent is to expand the boundaries of accepted logic and to encourage risk-taking in the actor.  Course work includes intensive classroom sessions, individual projects designed to promote self-discovery, and group projects focused on the process of collaborative work. 

 

11443

THTR 101 B  Introduction to Acting

Naomi Thornton

. . . Th .

3:20 -5:20 pm

FISHER

PART

2 credits    Scene preparation and beginning scene technique.  Emphasis on relaxation, breathing, and concentration.  Teaching the actor to make choices and implement them using sense memory and to integrate this work with the text.  Group and individual exercises and improvisations. Continuous work on the acting instrument stressing freedom, spontaneity, and individual attention. Materials: poems, monologues, stories, and scenes.  Reading of American plays, 1930 to present. 

 

11438

THTR 131   Voice for Majors

Elizabeth Smith

. T . . F

1:30 -3:00 pm

FISHER

PART

2 credits This course is designed to develop an awareness of the importance of physical relaxation, breath capacity and control, resonance and placement. There will also be an emphasis on clarity of articulation and the use of vocal range and inflection. This course is intended for moderated and prospective theater majors.

 

11440

THTR 141   Alexander Technique I

Judith Muir

. . W . .

12:00 -1:20 pm

FISHER

PART

1 credit. A world-respected technique developed over 100 years ago; the Alexander Technique is a valuable tool for performers, writers, scholars, and artists. It is a simple and practical approach to improving balance, coordination and movement. During this course we will learn about habits of thinking and moving that cause stress and fatigue. This awareness will enable different choices to be made in ourselves and how we respond to the environment.

 

11504

THTR 207A   Playwriting I

Chiori Miyagawa

. . W . .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

FISHER

PART

4 credits   An introductory course that focuses on discovering the writer’s voice. Through writing exercises based on dreams, visual images, poetry, social issues, found text, and music, each writer is encouraged to find his or her unique language, style, and vision.  A group project will explore the nature of collaborative works.  Students learn elements of playwriting through writing a one-act play, reading assignments, and class discussions.   This course is for sophomores and upper-college students only. 

 

11445

THTR 207B   Playwriting I

Zakiyyah Alexander

. . . . F

9:30 - 11:50 am

FISHER

PART

See above.

 

11505

THTR 208   Playwriting II

Zakiyyah Alexander

. . . Th .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

FISHER

PART

4 credits   This course will function as a writer’s workshop. Students focus on developing a full-length play, with sections of the work-in-progress presented in class for discussions.  Students grow as playwrights by developing characters and themes that are sustained through a full-length play.  The students will also read a wide range of dramatic literature and be exposed to diverse styles of playwriting. Prerequisite: Playwriting I or Theatrical Adaptations. 

 

11437

THTR 209   Scene Study

Jonathan Rosenberg

. T . Th .

10:30 - 12:00 pm

FISHER

PART

3 credits   A course intended for students who have taken one semester of Intro to Acting and would like to continue their study. The course deals with movement from a games oriented curriculum into work with theatrical texts and discovery of the processes of scene study.

 

11501

THTR 210   History of Theater II

Jean Wagner

. T . Th .

3:00 – 4:20 pm

OLINLC 120

AART

4 credits   This course is a survey of theater, drama and performance from a  global perspective, from the eighteenth to twenty-first centuries.  We  will begin with 18th century Sentimentalism and the relationship  between theater and the emergence of print culture; then continue with  an examination of Romanticism and other forms of theater as they  relate to nationalism and imperialism in Germany, France and Russia.   We will then explore the relationship between theater and popular entertainment in nineteenth and twentieth century Europe, the United States and Japan, followed by the historical avant-garde and theatrical innovation in Latin America, Eastern Europe and Asia in the twentieth century. We will end with an intercultural study of the relationship between theater and revolution.  The course will emphasize the role of performance as a cultural and political force in society, examine how developments in human communication shaped those in theater, and introduce methodologies employed by today’s theater historians.

 

11447

THTR 212   Writing Political Theater

Chiori Miyagawa

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

FISHER

PART

Cross-listed:  Human Rights  This course will explore political expression in this theatrical genre. Throughout history, theater has played an important role in the political life of various cultures.  It is a unique medium, one that communicates political messages through creative tools to live audiences, something that other forms of writing or speeches do not achieve.  The students will read political plays by world-renowned authors including Ken Saro Wiwa, Yoji Sakate, Caryl Churchill, Emily Mann, Athol Fugard, Ariel Dorfman and works by Free Theater of Belarus and others; and write several short plays and one longer play (30 min) on issues of their political interest.  This is a writing workshop. Email Prof. Miyagawa at Miyagawa@bard.edu a brief paragraph of interest in order to register in the course.

 

11444

THTR 215   Physical Comedy

James Calder

. . . . F

9:30 - 12:30 pm

FISHER

PART

2 credits  Beginning with exercises in broad physicality, balance, rhythm, discovery, physical mask and surprise, this class explores what about the individual student  is unique and funny. When we begin to forget what is an appropriate response, and imagine what we would be like if we were never socialized, we begin to discover “the clown” that lives in each of us. By embracing the archetypes of childhood and reclaiming the “internal response” without the diminishing filter of socialization, we start to lose the inhibitions that block us from being purely expressive. This class encourages openness, invention, playfulness, generosity, sensitivity, and courage.  Prerequisite:  Introduction to Acting.

 

11434

THTR 231   Voice and Verse I

Elizabeth Smith

M . . . .

10:00 - 12:00 pm

FISHER

PART

2 credits  Verse is a significant part of drama and learning to interpret it and speak it is essential for the performer. This course deals with verse from the great poets and dramatists, with an emphasis on Shakespeare. Prerequisite:  THTR 131.

 

11439

THTR 303   Directing Seminar

Jean Wagner

. . W . .

1:00 -4:00 pm

FISHER

PART

4 credits This is a studio course that covers the practice of directing from text analysis, ‘table work’, imagining the world of the play, design, casting, space, rehearsal and blocking in different configurations. The work will proceed from scenes to a full-length work. By permission of the instructor.

 

11446

THTR 307   Advanced Acting

James Calder

. . . . F

1:00 -4:00 pm

FISHER

PART

3 credits This is a studio acting class where students will explore scenes from challenging plays of varied styles. Extensive rehearsal time outside of class is required. Pre-requisites: Intro to Acting and Scene Study. Maximum enrollment: 12 students.

 

11442

THTR 308   Advanced Scene Study

Naomi Thornton

. . . Th .

1:00 -2:50 pm

FISHER

PART

3 credits    Scene Technique with work on specific rehearsal tasks and practice of their application. Continued work on the acting instrument, understanding the actor as artist and deepening the physical, emotional, intellectual connection and availability of each actor. Advanced individual exercises, scenes, and monologues from all dramatic literature. Intended for Upper College students, others by permission. Repeatable for credit.  Prerequisite: Introduction to Acting.

 

11427

THTR 310A   Survey of Drama:

Shakespeare

Jonathan Rosenberg

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 204

AART

A director reads a play the way a conductor reads a score; not as a work of literature but as a work to be translated into the language of the stage. In this class we will do a close reading of several of Shakespeare’s plays, trying to understand how the information analyzed and then processed through the director’s imagination, aesthetic, social and political views, emotions and dream life manifests in the production. We will also examine (through video, pictures and written descriptions) seminal productions of these plays and discuss how these directors might have read these texts. Although the primary reading will be of the plays themselves, there will be additional readings from texts including Jonathan Miller’s Subsequent Performances, Peter Brook’s The Shifting Point, Bert O. States’ Great Reckonings in Little Rooms, Jan Kott’s Shakespeare Our Contemporary, Susan Bennett’s Performing Nostalgia: Shifting Shakespeare and the Contemporary Past, Robert Edmond Jones’ Towards a New Theatre and The Dramatic Imagination and Political Shakespeare edited by Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield.   Open to upperclassmen and qualified sophomores by permission of the instructor.

 

11441

THTR / LIT 310B   Survey of Drama:

Euripides and Nietzsche

Thomas Bartscherer

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

FISHER

ELIT

Cross-listed: Classical Studies, Literature, Philosophy  In The Birth of Tragedy, Friedrich Nietzsche argues that the Greek playwright Euripides was responsible for the demise of tragic drama, which Nietzsche maintains had attained its highest expression in the productions of the older dramatists Aeschylus and Sophocles. It was, in particular, the influence of Socratic philosophy on Euripides that, according to Nietzsche, dealt the death blow to tragedy. This course aims to develop an understanding of Nietzsche’s interpretation of Euripides, and to consider its implications both for how we approach tragedy—on the page and on the stage—and for the interpretation of Nietzsche’s early philosophy.  In addition to a close study of The Birth of Tragedy and related texts by Nietzsche, we will read a substantial sampling of Greek tragedies (primarily by Euripides) and other theoretical approaches to tragedy significant for Nietzsche (Plato, Aristotle, Schlegel, Schopenhauer, etc.); watch film adaptations of the tragedies; and extend the inquiry through practical scene work. All readings will be in English. No prerequisites.

 

11506

THTR 310C   Survey of Drama:

Why Make Theater?

Joanne Akalaitis

. . W . .

4:30 –7:30 pm

 

AART

This course is a combination of courses Professor Akalaitis has taught in recent years, including Theater Salon and Theater In and About the World. It is also the result of her personal reaction to current theater production, which often seems deeply naďve and out of touch with world events and current art movements. We live in a perilous time.  The front page of The New York Times is both electrifying and terrifying. The latest local political and child abuse scandals are equally chilling. The photographs, often depicting horrifying events, can be uncannily beautiful, through the skill of the photo editors – for example, the photo of a fourteen-year-old runaway with cigarette in hand.  There is war in Iraq; horrific events in Afghanistan and Pakistan; genocide in Africa; secret kidnapping; torture and murder of terrorist suspects by the CIA; the growth of religious fundamentalism (both domestic and abroad); the health care crisis; the disastrous economy; corporate greed and blatant corruption; and rural and urban loneliness.  Yet theater often seems oblivious to all this.  For generations it has often used an outdated vocabulary and aesthetic ignoring both the real world and the explosion of ideas in the art world and in contemporary music.  This course is aimed at addressing these issues, mainly through the creation of short, sometimes site-specific pieces, using the campus and its surroundings as an environment for creative theatrical “events” with performance, text, music and visual media.  Works will stem from student-written texts; from “found” texts, especially The New York Times and other media; from existing texts, e.g. Shakespeare, Franz Xavier Kroetz and Euripides; and from philosophical writings such as Foucault and Peter Singer.  The creation of the work will be heavily impacted by what is happening in the world at the moment.  The intention is to question, expand and enlarge the practice of theater-making without denying or ignoring the canon.  Every week there will be a brief weekly report about a prominent cultural figure, e.g. Jean Baudrillard, Jean-Luc Godard, Tony Kushner.  There will be a museum visit and film screenings.  Students are required to write, read and perform.  Open to those interested in the culture of theater and the arts, and ways in which they can be touched by and touch the world.  The semester will end in a production or productions.  In other words, we will involve ourselves in the glorious practice of rehearsal and low-tech performance. Once a month we will have a guest and a home-cooked dinner at Professor Akalaitis’ apartment.

 

11436

THTR 318   Visual Imagination of the

Modern Stage

Carol Bailey

M . . . .

1:00 -4:00 pm

FISHER

PART

4 credits   A course taught by leading designers and directors in the field. It examines the explosive prominence of visionary visual ideas on the stage in the past 30 years, the emergence of a new form of collaboration between directors and designers and the inclusion of the new media on the stage. This course is required for upper-college theater students.