11054

PHYS 116 Acoustics

Matthew Deady

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 103

SCI

 

 

LAB A:

. . . . F

9:00 - 10:20 am

HEG 107

 

 

 

LAB B:

. . . . F

10:30 - 11:50 am

HEG 107

 

 

 

LAB C:

. . . . F

1:00 -2:20 pm

HEG 107

 

 

 

LAB D:

. . . . F

2:30 -3:50 pm

HEG 107

 

This laboratory course gives an introduction to the phenomena of acoustics, particularly aspects that are important in the production and perception of music. The physics of sound is covered in depth, and characteristics of acoustic and electronic instruments are discussed. Mathematical and laboratory techniques are introduced as needed. No specific science or mathematics background beyond algebra is assumed.

 

11473

PHYS 119 The Physics of Stuff

Christian Bracher

. T . Th .

1:30 -3:30 pm

ROSE 108

SCI

 

 

LAB A:

. . . . F

1:00 -2:20 pm

ROSE 108

 

 

 

LAB B:

. . . . F

2:30 -3:50 pm

ROSE 108

 

Starting from the smallest constituents, this course will explore the physical principles underlying the organization of matter into increasingly complex structures, and the resulting properties. Topics may include particles, nuclei, radioactivity, the concept of energy, atoms and molecules, the electric force, fundamentals of quantum mechanics, gases, crystals, basic laws of thermodynamics, polymers and biological matter, with selected applications. Laboratory sessions will be devoted to the study of the physical properties of materials, and will also serve to illustrate the physical models governing their behavior. The course requires a working knowledge of elementary algebra.  Prerequisites: Passed Q exam.

 

11597

PHYS 137 The Quantum World

Simeen Sattar

. T . Th .

4:00 -6:00 pm

HEG 106

SCI

Quantum mechanics is one of the revolutionary ideas of the twentieth century. For centuries it was supposed that the motion of objects ranging in size from planets to those visible only through a microscope are governed by the same laws, but this sensible assumption was found to be false for molecules, atoms and electrons. This course examines the surprising behavior of these very small objects, as it is revealed by their interaction with light. This will be investigated through laboratory and computational experiments. Basic calculus skills (taking derivatives and solving simple integrals) are essential. Prerequisites: A good foundation in high school physics or chemistry and Calculus I or the equivalent.

 

11050

PHYS 142 Introduction to Physics II

James Belk

M . W . .

10:30 - 12:30 pm

HEG 102

SCI

 

 

LAB A:

M . . . .

4:00 -6:00 pm

HEG 107

 

 

 

LAB B:

M . . . .

7:00 9:00 pm

HEG 107

 

 

 

LAB C:

. T . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

HEG 107

 

Part II of a calculus-based survey which will focus on electricity and magnetism, light, electromagnetic radiation, and optics. The course stresses ideas - the unifying principles and characteristic models of physics. Labs develop the critical ability to elicit understanding of our physical world. Prerequisites: Physics 141, Mathematics 141 LAB A is not open to first-year students.

 

11051

PHYS 210 Introduction to Electronics

Burton Brody

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

HEG 107

SCI

 

 

 

. . . Th .

2:30 -5:00 pm

HEG 107

 

Cross-listed: Cognitive Science This course is a survey of analog electronics ending with a brief introduction to digital electronics. Beginning with Kirchhoff's Laws, voltage dividers and filters, we will proceed to power supplies, amplifiers, oscillators, operational amplifiers, timers, and IC's.  We will employ semiconductor diodes, bipolar and field-effect transistors, and IC's.  We will leave time at the end to explore Boolean algebra and some basic digital electronic functions, ending with construction of a pared down bus-architecture prototype.  The course consists of equal parts lecture and lab.  Corequisites: at least one physics course and one math course numbered above 140. Class limited to 10 students; enrollment by permission of the instructor.

 

11586

PHYS 234 The Atmosphere and Ocean

In Motion

Gidon Eshel

. T . Th .

4:00-5:20 pm

HEG 102

MATC

A great deal of what climate change would look like depends on fluid motions: Would Europe wither in deep chill? That depends in part on the response of the Gulf Stream system to greenhouse forcing. Would Middle Eastern wars rage on for another century, taking on the new guise of water wars?  That depends on the response of the North Atlantic to thickening atmosphere and the Jet Stream's response to the North Atlantic. Would polar bears go extinct? That depends in part on circulation changes in the Arctic Ocean. It's all, or mostly, in the motion. This is a semi-technical course designed to help interested students acquire the tools needed and used to answer the questions like those above. A thorough technical treatment is deliberately sacrificed for a more intuitive and heuristic understanding. Prerequisites: PHYS 141 or its equivalent, and a willingness to learn some new self-contained math.

 

11052

PHYS 314 Thermal Physics

Matthew Deady

. T . Th .

8:30 - 10:20 am

HEG 106

SCI

This course studies the thermal behavior of physical systems,  employing thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and statistical mechanics.  Thermodynamical topics include equations of state, energy and entropy,  and the first and second laws of thermodynamics.  Both classical and  quantum statistical mechanics are covered, including distribution  functions, partition functions, and the quantum statistics of  Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein systems. Applications include atoms,  molecules, gases, liquids, solids, and phase transitions. Prerequisites: Physics 141-142, Mathematics 141-142.

 

11053

PHYS 403 Quantum Mechanics

Christian Bracher

. . W . F

10:30 - 12:30 pm

HEG 106

 

Elements of Schrodinger and Heisenberg formulations of quantum mechanics. Potential wells, hydrogen atoms, scattering, harmonic oscillator, perturbation theory, angular momentum. Prerequisite: Physics 321.