By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case.  In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project. 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

College & Community Ensembles

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble one or two credit may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

Scholarship auditions will be held on Wednesday February 3rd, 2010.

 

11250

MUS 104   Bard College Orchestra

Nathan Madsen

. . W . .

7:00 - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. Auditions will be held on Monday January 25th, 2010 from 6:00 pm until 9:00pm for new members. Please call to set up appt., 845-758-7131. * First Orchestra rehearsal will be on Wednesday January 27th, 2010 from 7:00 pm until 10:00 pm in Sosnoff Theatre. * (Please be prepared to play two pieces—one slower and lyrical, and one faster.)

 

11294

MUS 105   Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30 - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

 

11478

MUS 106   Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . . . .

 

.

PART

Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart  by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration.

 

11251

MUS 108B   Ensemble: Contemporary

Joan Tower

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PART

 

11295

MUS 108D   Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:00 -6:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits.  Auditions will be held by appointment for new members.  First rehearsal will be on Tuesday,  February 2nd, 2010.

 

11252

MUS 108F   Ensemble: Jazz Big Band

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

 

11479

MUS 108H   Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Richard Davis

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

OLIN 305

PART

 

11296

MUS 108J   Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

 

11480

MUS 108N   Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:30 -6:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composer’s works, ranging from sextet to big band.  This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music.  There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester.  Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed.  Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer.  Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting. 

 

11285

MUS 126   Beethoven & His World

Christopher Gibbs

M . W . .

12:00 -1:20 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course will survey the life and works of Beethoven in the context of Viennese culture from the 1790’s to the 1820’s.  We will sample a variety of Beethoven’s compositions in most of the major genres in which he wrote: keyboard, chamber, and vocal music, as well as orchestral (symphonies, overtures, and concertos), dramatic (especially the opera Fidelio), and religious.  His accomplishment will be compared with that of his immediate musical predecessors- notably Mozart and his teacher Haydn – and contemporaries, figures such as Rossini and Schubert.  We will explore as well relevant philosophical trends at the time ( Kant and Hegel), as well as influential literary currents ( Schiller and Goethe). This course is given as a complement to a cycle of the complete symphonies of Beethoven that will be performed at the Fisher Performing Arts Center by the American Symphony Orchestra conducted by Leon Botstein.  Students will attend rehearsals and performances of the symphonies.  Live performances of selected keyboard, chamber, and vocal pieces will also be presented in class.  The ability to read music or play an instrument is not necessary to take this course- all interested students are welcome.

 

11481

MUS 140   Introduction to World Music

Mercedes Dujunco

. T . Th .

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N217

AART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies  This course surveys various folk and traditional musics of the non-Western world. Music cultures will be discussed individually in turn, all the while maintaining a cross-cultural or cross-regional perspective in order to discern underlying themes and processes common to many of them as well as differences and points of divergence that make each one unique. Although organized according to geographical and cultural areas, attention will be paid to important cross-cultural considerations such as ideas about music, the social organization of music, repertoires of music, the material culture of music, culture contact, and musical change. Discussion will also include issues such as cultural ownership, appropriation, and commodification that have arisen as the countries and places where the musics originate from get more deeply implicated in the global economy. Some class time will be devoted to exercises in critical listening and aural analysis. Background in music is not required.  This course fulfills the Music History requirement for majors.

 

11286

MUS 172   Jazz Harmony II

John Esposito

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N211

PART

Part II - This course will include acquisition of the basic skills that make up the Foundation of all jazz styles.  We will also study the Jazz Language from the BEBOP ERA up to the 60’s. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.

 

11297

MUS 183   High / Low: Tensions

And Agreements

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

2:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N217

AART

As far back as the early Renaissance, distinctions were made as to what constituted popular and serious music.  In the 15th century some of those distinctions were defined by the music’s relationship to the church.  Later, in the 18th and 19th centuries, idiomatic folk music began to be deliberately used in opera and symphonic repertoire to evoke elements of nationalism and “local color.”  In the 20 and 21st centuries, characteristics of jazz, folk, and rock music intermingled, and now some earlier distinctions between popular and serious music are being blurred.  In this course, key works in Western classical music from the 16th through the 21st centuries will be studied along with the popular music of the day (when available).  Careful attention will be paid to critical reaction to these works, along with an examination of the cultural climate and trends that might have contributed to high/low distinctions.  Works to be studied will include: Josquin, Missa L’homme arme, Handel, Messiah, Haydn, Symphony No. 104, excerpts from Berlioz’s Les Troyens, Ravel, L’enfant et le sortilege, and excerpts from Philip Glass’s Einstein on the Beach, and John Adam’s Nixon in China.  Music of Louis Armstrong, George Gershwin, Miles Davis, The Velvet Underground, The Beatles, and Sonic Youth, among others, will be examined.  Evaluation will be based on two exams, four short papers, and a term paper.  This course counts toward music history credit.

 

11287

MUS 202   Music Theory II

Kyle Gann / Sharon Bjorndal Lavery

. T . Th .

. . W . F

1:00 -2:20 pm

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N217

PART

Continuation of Music Theory I, introduction to harmony, various seventh chords, secondary dominants, basics of modulation, four-part writing and voice-leading.  End result: ability to write a hymn, song or brief movement of tonal music.  Theoretical work will be complemented by weekly ear-training labs focused on developing the ability to sing and recognize secondary dominants, modulations, and so on. Prerequisite: Music Theory I or equivalent (knowledge of scales and keys).  This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors. (Tuesday and Thursday sessions are Theory, Wednesday and Friday are Labs.)

 

11288

MUS 212   Jazz Literature II

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies, SRE  We will study the words of Gary Gidden “Visions in Jazz” and Robert Gottlieb from his book entitled “Reading Jazz” in order to bring attention to some important literature on Jazz. Some of the writers look beyond Jazz as an art form, but also bring attention to the historical influence on culture, race, tradition and our social experience.  Writers like Albert Murry, Ralph Ellison, Eudora Welty. There is an attempt in their works to illuminate the significance of the musical potential the musicians inherit and the creative option they exercise.  This course includes the words of many who have been hailed as Jazz Greatest Musicians. 

 

11298

MUS 235   Music of Claudio Monteverdi

Frederick Hammond

. T . Th .

10:30 - 11:50 am

OLIN 104

AART

Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643) was the first great composer of the Baroque, and his music continues to grow in interest and attraction.  We will consider his career in its various historic and artistic contexts:  its beginning at the brilliant court of the Gonzaga family in Mantua, and its conclusion in Venice, where in 1613 Monteverdi had become master of the ducal chapel of San Marco.  We will examine his productions in their various genres:  the madrigal; opera  (including L’Orfeo, his first opera, and L’incoronazione di Poppea, his last); the masque, combining singing, dancing, and staged action; and sacred music in the great Venetian tradition (not only the well-know Mass and Vespers of 1610, but also the equally great mass of Thanksgiving to  the Madonna of the Salute for deliverance from the Plague in 1631).  The course fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.

 

11299

MUS 254B   Pronunciation & Diction for Singers II: Italian, French, German, English & Latin

Sharon Bjorndal Lavery

. T . Th .

2:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature.  The fall semester will be devoted to the Italian and French languages, the spring to German, English, and Latin.  Through songs, arias, and choral literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language.  While it is geared towards singers and collaborative pianists, the course is also useful for other instrumentalists and students seeking to refine pronunciation and accent.  Grading will be based on a series of quizzes and two exams, including the preparation and performance of one song per language.  Ability to read music is not required.  No previous knowledge of the languages is required. 

 

11302

MUS 255   Analysis of the Classics of Modernism

Kyle Gann

. . W . F

3:00 -4:20 pm

BLM N217

AART

The half-century from 1910 to 1960 saw an explosion of dissonance, complexity and  apparent musical chaos.  And yet, beneath the surface it was also an era of unprecedented intricacy of structure and musical systematization.  The liberation of dissonance and  dissolution of melody left composers insecure, and they often compensated by creating systems of tremendous rigor not always apparent to the listener. This course will analyze in depth several works that changed the way we think about composing, and which  pioneered the growth of an atonal musical language.  Explore the cinematographic intercutting of Stravinsky’s Le Sacre du Printemps; the textural overlayering of Ives’s Three Places in New England; the elegant mathematical proportioning of Bartok’s Music for Strings Percussion and Celeste: the delicate symmetries of Webern’s Symphonie Op. 21; the total organization of Stockhausen’s Gruppen; and the compelling multi tempo climaxes  of Nancarrow’s Study No. 36.  Intended for music majors, for whom it counts as music theory credit, but other strongly motivated students are welcome.

Prerequisite:  Fundamentals of Music or the equivalent (ability to analyze tonal harmony).

 

11300

MUS 259   Musical Electronics: Analog Synthesis and Processing

Robert Bielecki

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course concentrates on the creative use of electronic circuitry and the construction of devices for musical applications.  Students will develop an understanding of how basic electronic components are used in audio circuits and how to read schematic diagrams.  We’ll discuss topics such as Voltage Control, Synthesis, Filtering, Waveshaping, Phase Shifting, Ring Modulation, Theremins, Circuit Bending, etc.  We’ll work from existing designs and also create new devices as we hone our skills of soldering, point-to-point wiring and layout.  Familiarity with basic electronics and the use of hand tools is helpful but not a prerequisite for this class.  Enrollment limited.

 

11289

MUS 265   Literature & Language of

Music II

Peter Laki

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N217

AART

A survey of selected musical works composed in the 19th and 20th centuries.  Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits.  In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams.  As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected.  This course is primarily designed for music majors including sophomores. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  It is not required that students have taken the first semester (Music 264), which covered music from the Middle Ages to 1800.

 

11290

MUS 266B   American Popular Song

1930-1950

John Esposito

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies   This performance-based course is a survey of the major American popular song composers of the Tin Pan Alley era, whose work forms the core of the jazz repertoire. Composers studied will include Gershwin, Berlin, Porter, Ellington, Warren, Rodgers, and others. The course will include readings, recorded music, and films. The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony II or permission of the instructor.

 

11482

MUS 287   Musical Ethnography

Mercedes Dujunco

. . W . .

. . . . F

1:30 -2:50 pm

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Anthropology, SRE  This course provides practical instruction in field research and analytical methods in ethnomusicology.  It is intended to assist students who are considering doing a senior project that is ethnomusicological in nature in sorting through critical decisions regarding choice of topic, area interests, research models, etc. by providing a sense of the field, its options, and the real-life practice of ethnomusicology.  Topics will include research design, grantsmanship, fieldwork, participant observation, writing fieldnotes, interviews and oral histories, survey instruments, textual analysis, audio-visual methods, archiving, performance as methodology, historical research, and the poetics, ethics, and politics of cultural representation. Students will conceive, design, and carry out a limited research project over the course of a semester.  To prepare for the experience of applying for research grants in the future, they will also write up a proposal for a project (this may be the same as the semester project) and defend it in a mock review by a small panel that will include faculty and/or scholars from related disciplines.

 

11291

MUS 332   Jazz: The Freedom Principle II

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, SRE   This is a survey course in Jazz History, which is part II of a four- part course. This is a study of Jazz from 1927 to 1942, the big band or swing era.  Emphasis will be on  band leaders such as Jimmie Lunceford, Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey, Teddy Wilson, Count Basie and Duke Ellington. This course employs a cultural approach designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music from 1927 to 1942 and examine its’ effect on the music.  This will be illustrated with recordings, films and videos. This class requires oral presentation and critical listening.

 

11598

MUS 333  Sound / Art Workshop in Electro-Acoustic Composition and Interdisciplinarity

Marina Rosenfeld

. .W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society Across the contemporary artistic spectrum, electro-acoustic sound and music are increasingly found in confrontation with the visual. This course will focus on the creative work of student composers with special emphasis on interdisciplinary forms. Readings will supplement compositional exercises, but the course is primarily intended as an open format for the critique and exploration of ongoing student work, as well as examination of works from the field, including in the areas of video, animation, digital media, broad- (or pod-) casting, and new forms of graphical/digital notation. Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor.

 

11496

MUS 345   Introductory Psychoacoustics

Robert Bielecki

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

AART

"Reality is a myth, perception is what matters".  This course will examine auditory perception and hearing  and serve as an introduction to how hearing works. The first half of the semester begins with a description of the physiology and function of the ear and how we process auditory information.   Some topics include: perception of pitch, loudness, location, auditory illusions, critical bands, masking, threshold of hearing, hearing loss, and audiometry.   The second half of the semester will focus on sound localization and the technologies used in spatialization and 3-D audio. We will explore auditory localization cues, HRTF, binaural recording, spatial audio synthesis, sound for virtual realities and immersive environments. This course should be of particular interest to anyone involved in music and audio technology.

 

11599

MUS 358  Workshop in Electronic Music Performance

Marina Rosenfeld

. T . . .

4:00 -6:20 pm

BLM N110

PART

How do we perform historical works of electronic and experimental music in 2010? Do we re-enact or reinterpret originary circumstances, substitute software for hardware, attempt to reproduce authentic or "period" sounds, remix, sample or otherwise historicize documentary evidence of "classic" performances? This is a hands-on workshop that will challenge students to consider theoretical and practical aspects of the interpretation and performance of selected works by Stockhausen, Cage, Tenney and others, through live ensemble performance. 

 

11602

MUS 363   John Cage and His World

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

4:00 -6:20 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed:  STS  Long reviled as a charlatan or a madman, John Cage has finally achieved recognition as probably the most influential composer and musical thinker of the latter twentieth century.  This course will focus primarily on analysis of Cage’s music, encompassing such innovations as the prepared piano, chance, and indeterminacy.  It will be set in the context of the work and thought of his numerous teachers and influences, as well as colleagues and collaborators from the worlds of music (Satie, Schoenberg, Varese, Cowell, Harrison, Feldman, Brown, Wolff, Tudor), visual arts (Duchamp, Futurism, Dada Fluxus, Rauschenberg, Johns), dance (Cunningham and others) religious thought (Meister Eckhard, Hinduism, Taoism, the I Ching, Zen Buddhism) literature, political and social writing (Thoreau, Joyce, Fuller, McLuhan). Student work may take the form of papers, analyses, realizations and performances of Cage scores, or creation of new works inspired by Cagean examples.  Texts will include Silence, A Year from Monday, and other writings by and about Cage. By consent of the instructor. This course fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.

 

11307

MUS 366B   Advanced Contemporary

Jazz Techniques II

John Esposito

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

This course continues methods for the jazz improviser to deconstruct and reorganize the basic harmonic and rhythmic elements for a composition.  Issues addressed will include reharmonization, remetering, metric modulation, variations in phrasing, tempo, and dynamics; that is, the arrangement and reorganization of compositional elements.  This is a performance oriented class and repertoire will include jazz standards and compositions of the instructor.  This class is open to moderated upper college students who have successfully completed Jazz Harmony I and II, and previous jazz repertory classes.  This course fulfills an upper level music theory requirement for music majors.

 

11483

MUS 367B   Jazz Composition II

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This course continues the strategies from Jazz Composition I, including basic modal harmony, melodic and rhythmic development. Prerequisite: Jazz Composition I.

MUSIC WORKSHOPS:

 

11292

MUS WKSHA   Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M . . . .

4:00 -6:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class and then  eventually to professionals(the  Da Capo Players) who give a concert of some of that music at the end  of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement. Not open to first-year students.   Students should contact Prof. Tower prior to registration to determine eligibility.

 

11301

MUS WKSHB   Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart /

Blair McMillen

. T . Th .

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

4:00 -6:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration.  Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart  by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration.

 

11303

MUS WKSHG   Vocal Music:

Heinrich Schütz

Frederick Hammond / Arthur Burrows

. . W . .

10:00 - 12:00 pm

BDH

PART

In this singing class we will explore the vocal works of Heinrich Schütz (1585- 1672), the greatest German composer of the seventeenth century and the first German composer of international stature, who transformed the styles of his teachers, Giovanni Gabrieli and Claudio Monteverdi,  into a uniquely personal idiom.

 

11304

MUS WKSHL   Workshop: Opera Workshop

Rufus Müller /

 Ilka LoMonaco

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits   Work is to be decided.  For more information see Professor Muller.   Contact  Prof. Müller by email: rumu2000@earthlink.net to arrange an audition before registration.

 

11293

MUS WKSHM   Music Workshop:

THE GERMANS ARE COMING!

Rufus Müller

M . . . .

2:00 -4:20 pm

BDH

PART

Song recitals can be so stale, so in this performance-oriented course for singers and pianists focusing on the German Lied of the 19th and 20th centuries, our particular emphasis is on how to communicate vividly with our audience, as well as providing guidance on German diction.

 

11618

MUS WKSPO   Introduction to Electronic Music

see Richard Teitelbaum. Miguel Frasconi

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N110

PART

This hands-on workshop will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus primarily on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog recording techniques and devices. Topics to be covered include the physics of sound, psychoacoustics, and foundational practices in electro-acoustic sound production and their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on digital signal processing, instrument "discovery" and exploration, field recording, and modes of electronic diffusion, including multichannel installation, broadcast, live performance and multimedia. Students will be given instruction in the use of ProTools, Quicktime with Protools for soundtrack production, and will become familiar with sampling, multi-track recording, editing, and mixing. Throughout the semester, students will produce field recordings and other original recordings in diary format and will receive instruction and guidance in utilizing this work for electronic composition, performance and installation. Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring the aesthetic, political, historical and personal implications of music technology and its uses. Enrollment in this course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios. In addition to the digital workstations, students can also explore analog synthesis techniques using the vintage Serge modular synthesizer.

 

11485

MUS WKSHV   Chinese Music Ensemble

Mercedes Dujunco

. T . Th .

4:00 -5:20 pm

BLM 117

PART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies   A beginner's workshop for students interested in learning to play Chinese folk music through performance on instruments of the "silk and bamboo" (Chinese string and wind instruments) category. Students acquire basic skills on one of several instruments that may include the di (bamboo transverse flute), the erhu (2-stringed fiddle), zheng (21-string plucked board zither), yangqin (hammered dulcimer), pipa (short-necked pear-shaped plucked lute), and sanxian (long-necked 3-stringed plucked lute), with the goal of eventually playing together in ensemble. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.   

 

11484

MUS WKSP4   Workshop: Jazz

Improvisation II

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:00 -7:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  This class is structured as a continuation of Jazz Improvisation I. The goal will be to gain mastery over all of the basic scales used in traditional jazz improvisation, and to attain the ability to improvise over basic two-five patterns and simple modal progressions. Prerequisite:  Jazz Improvisation Workshop I, or consent of the instructor.

 

11305

MUS WKSP7   Jazz Vocal Workshop

John Esposito

M . . . .

4:30  -6:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

Not open to first-year students

 

SPECIAL PROJECTS:

Special Projects are designed for music majors only, to pursue individual or group projects with a particular professor. Schedules are arranged individually.

 

11486

MUS PROJ B  Special Projects

James Bagwell

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

11487

MUS PROJ EL  Special Projects

Erica Lindsay

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

11488

MUS PROJ R  Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

11489

MUS PROJ U  Special Projects

Kyle Gann

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

11490

MUS PROJ V  Special Projects

Joan Tower

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

11491

MUS PROJ Z  Special Projects

Thurman Barker

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

PRIVATE MUSIC LESSONS

All matriculated Bard students may be eligible to receive academic credit and scholarships for private instrumental or voice lessons. The choice of teachers is to be worked out on a case by case basis by the student and the Music Department. The teacher and student arrange payments and schedule.

Requirements for academic credit:
1) Registered, matriculated Bard College student.

2) Assignment of grade, based on performance in a departmental concert or audition by an evaluating panel at the end of each semester.
3) Participation in a music course that provides the student a larger forum of music making. A waiver of this requirement is possible in certain circumstances and is subject to Music Department review.

Credits awarded for the courses:

     Lessons:  1 or 2 credits
     Performance class:  2 credits
     Ensembles:    1 or 2 credits  (check description)
     Chorus:  1 credit


Requirements for scholarship:
1) Selection for scholarship by departmental evaluating panel, either through performance in a departmental concert or through audition.
2) Registration in an ensemble or performance class.


Maximum of  12 lessons @ $30.00 per lesson (towards lesson cost) available, applied as credit to student’s Bard account.