11229

BIO 142   Organismal Biology

William Maple

. . W . F

10:30 - 12:30 pm

RKC 103

SCI

 

 

              LAB A:

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:30 pm

RKC 114

 

 

 

              LAB B:

. . . . F

1:30 -3:30 pm

RKC 114

 

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies   An introduction to organismal biology and ecology, primarily for those who intend to continue in biology; also open to interested students not majoring in science. Topics include population genetics, evolution, vertebrate embryology and anatomy, and animal phylogeny, taxonomy, and ecology. Biology 142 may be taken before Biology 141, if necessary. Students majoring in biology are strongly encouraged to enroll in Chemistry 142 concurrently. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses. 

 

11231

BIO 144   Biostatistics

Philip Johns

. T . Th .

9:00 - 10:20 am

RKC 115

MATC

 

 

               LAB:

. . . Th .

1:00 -3:50 pm

RKC 115

 

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies   This course focuses on the statistical concepts and tools biologists regularly use to analyze, evaluate, and interpret data.  Topics include the basics of experimental design, probability theory, descriptive and inferential statistics, and graphical representation of data.  We will apply these tools to real biological data sets and see how other researchers have done the same. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses and at least one introductory biology course.

 

11232

BIO 146   Earth & Life through Time

Catherine O'Reilly

. . W . F

9:00 - 10:20 am

RKC 103

SCI

 

 

                LAB A:

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 114

 

 

 

                LAB B:

. . . Th .

9:00 - 12:00 pm

RKC 114

 

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies   The course provides an introduction to our dynamic earth on its true timescale. We will examine physical processes operating on the earth and how it has changed since its formation. This includes longer time scale processes like climate change and glaciation as well as hazards such as volcanoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, and meteorite impacts. We will weave in the beginning of life, its consequences for the earth, evolution, and extinction. Labs will involve field trips to local sites of geologic interest. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses.

 

11230

BIO 151   From Genes to Traits

Michael Tibbetts

M . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC  111 / 112

SCI

Cross-listed: GISP; Science, Technology & Society; SRE   This course takes an introductory look at the relationships between genetics, environment, and biochemistry. It is intended for students with a strong interest in science and is appropriate for biology majors. The course will begin with an examination of heredity in both classical and modern molecular contexts. It will then focus on the relationships between genes and proteins, and the complex biochemical interactions that produce a phenotype. The course will culminate in a discussion of the ways in which the environment interacts with multiple genes to influence complex traits, for example schizophrenia, and the modern methods applied to the problem of identifying the genetic components of these traits. The laboratory will provide an opportunity to examine some of the principles discussed in the lecture in more detail and to become acquainted with some of the methodologies and instrumentation found in a modern biology laboratory.  Prerequisite: successful completion of Q exam, and experience in high school biology and chemistry.

 

11233

BIO 201   Eukaryotic Genetics

Brooke Jude

M . . . .

8:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 114 / 115

SCI

 

 

 

. . W . .

8:30 - 10:20 am

RKC 114 / 115

 

Cross-listed:  Cognitive Science, GISP   This course is an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance and the generation of diversity in eukaryotic organisms.  This course takes a modern approach to the study of genetics in which classical ideas about genotype, phenotype and inheritance are integrated into the modern molecular and genomic understanding of the processes involved in the generation of diversity.  In addition to discussions of the molecular mechanisms involved in DNA replication,  recombination, the generation and repair of mutations, and the relationship between genotype and phenotype, special consideration is given to our understanding of the processes involved in generating population-level variation in complex traits and how this understanding can help us identify the myriad genetic and non-genetic factors influencing these traits.  The laboratory consists of a semester long project involving the genetic manipulation of a model organism’s genome to address one or more topics in the course.   Prerequisite: One biology course at the 140 level or higher. 

 

11234

BIO 202   Ecology and Evolution

Felicia Keesing

. . W . .

9:00 - 12:00 pm

RKC 111 / 112

SCI

 

 

 

. . . . F

9:00 - 11:00 am

RKC 111 / 112

 

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies   This core course for biology majors is an introduction to the general principles of ecology and evolution that, with genetics, form the core of biological understanding. In addition to studying foundational ideas in both ecology and evolution, we will explore modern topics at the boundary between these two areas. We will consider, for example, how genetic variation among individual organisms can influence ecological interactions, and how these interactions can influence fitness. We will focus on a mechanistic understanding of processes, using model-building to inform that understanding.  Prerequisite: One biology course at the 140 level or higher.

 

11459

BIO 208   Visiting Speakers Seminar

Felicia Keesing

. . . Th .

12:00 – 1:00 pm

RKC 103

SCI

This 1-credit course will provide students with broad exposure to biology through the biology visiting speaker seminar series.    Students will hear about the wide-ranging research interests of invited biologists and have opportunities to interact informally with them.  The course is graded Pass/Fail and students are responsible for short follow-up assignments for at least 80% of the talks.   Recommended for sophomore and junior biology majors.

 

11235

BIO 303   Microbiology

Brooke Jude

. T . Th .

8:30 - 10:20 am

RKC 111

SCI

 

 

                  LAB:

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 112

 

The biology and ecology of the prokaryotes and the viruses.  Every attempt is made to organize the diversity of the prokaryotes into a modern phylogenetic context based on the latest results of molecular evolutionary analyses.  The first portion of the course deals with prokaryotic cell biology and growth, the second with plant viruses, viroids, bacteriophages, animal viruses, and prions, and the third with the diversity of the prokaryotes, ranging from the Archaea through both pathogenic and nonpathogenic Bacteria. Laboratory work provides practical experience in dealing with prokaryotes and bacteriophages. This course is appropriate for both those interested in a career in the health professions and those interested in ecology. Offered in alternate fall semesters; this course is a prerequisite for Biology 310.  Prerequisites: Biology 141-142, Chemistry 141-142; Chemistry 201-202 is recommended concurrently.   

 

11457

BIO 315   Advanced Evolution

Philip Johns

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

RKC 122

SCI

 

 

                  LAB:

M . . . .

9:00 - 12:00 pm

RKC 112

 

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies   Evolution is one of the primary ties that bind the discipline of biology together.  "Nothing in biology makes sense except in light of evolution", someone observed.  In this class we will examine how biologists study evolution on several levels.  We will examine the various forces of evolution.  We will use population and quantitative genetics to address fundamental questions in biology.  We will examine patterns of evolution within and among populations, across species, and we will learn tools that let us address cross-species comparisons.  Although this is not a paleontology class, we will examine evolutionary patterns through time.  We will also examine what evolution can reveal about other disciplines, such as medicine, and how modern genomic and bioinformatic techniques both rely on evolutionary principles and have revolutionized how evolutionary biologists do our jobs.  This class includes a laboratory and one or two field trips.

 

11249

BIO 316   Tropical Ecology

Catherine O'Reilly

. . . . F

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 115

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies   Tropical ecosystems are among the most biodiverse, most threatened, and the least studied in the world. This course will examine both practical and theoretical aspects that are unique to tropical ecosystems, including the role of geology, biogeochemical cycling, evolutionary processes and species interactions. In addition, we will discuss issues related to conservation, such as habitat fragmentation and climate change. This course will include lectures, student presentations, and research projects. Students will design, conduct, synthesize, and present a field research project. There will be a trip to conduct the research projects in La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica over spring break. Additional costs will apply. Application form required. Contact the instructor for more information. Prerequisites: Moderation, Bio 202 Ecology and Evolution, permission of the instructor.

 

11467

CHEM 390   Biochemistry

Swapan Jain

. . W . F

10:30 - 12:00 pm

RKC 115

SCI

 

 

                  LAB:

. . . . F

1:00 -5:00 pm

RKC 122/124

 

See Chemistry section for description.

 

11458

BIO 411   Cancer Biology

Michael Tibbetts

. . . Th .

4:00 -6:00 pm

RKC 122

SCI

2 credits  Cancer is a genetic disease that cannot be inherited, it is a disease in which one's own cells disrupt normal physiological functions, it is a disease for which some therapies result in the loss of the bodies ability to fight disease.  This advanced course will look at the complex reasons for these paradoxes and more by looking at a particular cancer from several perspectives: epidemiological, physiological, genetic, molecular and cellular.  A seminar style approach will be taken in which both text and the primary literature sources will be used to examine issues of cancer cause, progression, and treatment.  Students will be expected to present primary literature articles and to write a research paper on a type of cancer.  Prerequisites: moderated in biology and permission of instructor.   

 

11809

BIO 422   Cary Institute Seminar in Ecology

Stuart Findlay

M . . . .

3:00 -5:00 pm

RKC 100

 

2 credits. The weekly seminar series hosted by the Cary Institute, Millbrook, NY, brings national leaders to speak about current topics in ecology. To enhance the opportunity for Bard graduate and undergraduate students to take advantage of these visitors, these seminars will be made available at Bard as part of this course. In advance of the talk, the instructor will assign readings so students can obtain background knowledge on the week's topic. Following the talk, the instructor will lead a discussion at Bard. When appropriate, the instructor will be accompanied by Cary Institute scientists who are specialists in the topic of the week’s discussion.

 

11238

BIO IND PJ   Independent Research 199-399

Philip Johns

. . W . .

9:00 - 11:00 am

RKC 113

 

2 credits