11161

ARTH 102   Perspectives in World Art II

Julia Rosenbaum

M . W . .

3:00 -4:20 pm

OLINLC 115

AART/DIFF

This course, the second half of a two-semester survey, will continue to explore the visual arts worldwide. Beginning in the fourteenth century and ending in the present, the class will survey painting, sculpture, and architecture, as well as works in newer media (such as photography, video, and performance). The class will encompass works from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, arranged chronologically in order to provide a more integrated historical context for their production. In addition to the course textbook, readings will be chosen to broaden critical perspectives and to present different methodological approaches. This course is designed for those students with no background in art history as well as for those who may be contemplating a major in art history or studio. Students who have taken part one of this course will be given either preferential enrollment. First and second year students are encouraged to enroll.

 

11162

ARTH 113   History of Photography

Laurie Dahlberg

. T . Th .

9:00 - 10:20 am

RKC 103

AART

The discovery of photography was announced in 1839, almost simultaneously by several inventors. Born of experiments in art and science, the medium combines vision and technology. It possesses a uniquely intimate relation to reality and for this reason has many applications outside the realm of fine art; nevertheless, from its inception photography has been a vehicle for artistic aspirations. This survey of the history of photography from its earliest manifestations to the 1970s considers the medium’s applications – as art, science, historical record, and document. This course is open to all students and is the prerequisite for most other courses in the history of photography. 

 

11391

ARTH 115   The Classical Tradition in Western Architecture

Diana Minsky

. . W . F

12:00 -1:20 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

Cross-listed: Classical Studies, Environmental & Urban Studies   This lecture-based class traces classicism, one of the dominant strains of Western design, in public architecture from its beginnings in ancient Greece to its presence in contemporary America in order to understand its evolving political iconography (both democratic and dictatorial).  After defining the formal vocabulary, major monuments, and symbolic associations of its Greek and Roman roots, the central section of the class will focus on the Italian Renaissance's revival and reinvention of the classical vocabulary through the birth of archaeology, the writing of architectural treatises, and the adaptation of classical types to Christian functions.  Next, the class explores the impact of Enlightenment interpretations, the discovery of Pompeii, and the opening up of Greece on classical revival monuments.  The final weeks study the role of classical architecture in America from Thomas Jefferson to Post-Modernism.  Requirements include tests, a series of short critical essays, and a field trip to New York City.  Open to all students.

 

11163

ARTH 126   Architecture since 1945

Noah Chasin

. T . Th .

1:00 -2:20 pm

RKC 103

AART

Cross-listed:   Environmental & Urban Studies;   STS  A survey of the major transformation in architectural practice and debate since the end of World War II, with a focus on the challenges aimed at the modernist discourses of the early 20th century. These challenges begin with Team 10's critique of the historical avant-garde and encompass regionalism, neorationalism, corporate modernism, so-called “blob” architecture, and various permutations of these models. Attention is also paid to alternative and experimental practices that deal with pop art, cybernetic, semiological, and new media discourses. The course concludes with the impact on built form of globalization and advanced information technologies.

 

11189

ARTH 128   Art of the Ancient Near East

Julia Rosenbaum

. T . Th .

4:00 – 5:20 pm

RKC 102

AART

This course surveys the art and culture of an area in the Near East known as Mesopotamia, “the land between the rivers.” This region, corresponding to present-day Iraq, Syria, and Iran, has been considered the cradle of civilization. Here, in the millennia before Christ from roughly 3500 BCE to 330BCE, the first urban societies arose, writing was invented, empires were born, and great power and wealth amassed. With the emergence of urban centers came monumental palaces and temples and the successive peoples of this region, first the Sumerians, then the Babylonians, the Assyrians, and the Persians produced a rich visual culture ranging from carved stone palace reliefs to sacred ritual objects and ornaments to precious ivory, gold, and bronze luxury goods. We will examine the art and architecture of these ancient societies in their social, political, and cultural contexts, with an emphasis on the use of art in the expression of authority and legitimacy, religious and ritual ideologies, and artistic interconnections such as those between Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, Turkey, and the Levant. The course will also address modern imaginings of the ancient Near East and conclude with contemporary issues concerning the antiquities market and cultural repatriation of national objects. A goal of the course is to encourage a critical reading of the works of art based on approaches from art history and archaeology. Museum trips to New York are required. Open to all students.

 

11492

ARTH 160   Survey of Latin American Art

Susan Aberth

. T . . .

. . . Th .

4:00 -6:20 pm

4:00 -5:20 pm

RKC 101

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: LAIS (core course) SRE;   Related interest:  Africana Studies, Theology   A broad overview of art and cultural production in Latin America, including South and Central America, Mexico, and the hispanophone Caribbean. A survey of major pre-Columbian monuments is followed by an examination of the contact between Europe and the Americas during the colonial period, 19th-century Eurocentrism, and the reaffirmation of national identity in the modern era. This is a writing intensive course. The general goals of the writing component of the course are to improve the development, composition, organization, and revision of analytical prose; the use of evidence to support an argument; strategies of interpretation and analysis of texts; and the mechanics of grammar and documentation. Regular short writing assignments will be required.

 

11165

ARTH 210   Roman Art and Architecture

Diana Minsky

. T . Th .

4:00 -5:20 pm

OLIN 102

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies, Italian Studies   This course follows the development of Roman art and architecture from the founding of the city by Romulus in 753 B.C.E. to the transfer of the capital to the east by Constantine in 330 C.E. Lectures and discussions explore how Rome incorporated and synthesized the styles and achievements of conquered peoples (including Etruscans, Greeks, and Egyptians) to produce something entirely new that not only communicated the nature of the empire but also established a common artistic vocabulary throughout the Mediterranean basin. The ability of art and architecture to communicate political policy and the conversion of the classical into the Christian are among the themes of the course. Participation in the class qualifies students for consideration for future sessions of Roma in situ, taught in Rome over intersession.

 

11164

ARTH / PHOT  215   Photography in

America

Laurie Dahlberg

. T . Th .

2:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 102

AART

Photography was one of the first areas of artistic production in which the United States achieved international predominance. This course examines American photographs in the context of the history, art, and literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include the daguerreotype’s resonance with transcendental philosophy; the indelible photographic images of the Civil War; photography and the rise of American consumer culture, the progressive movement, and photographic “muckraking”; photography’s place in Stieglitz’s literary/artistic circle; and photography and American postwar social alienation.

 

11166

ARTH 231   The High Renaissance

Jean French

. T . Th .

10:30 - 11:50 am

OLIN 102

AART

Cross-listed: Italian Studies  A study of major painters and sculptors of the High Renaissance in Florence and Rome, focusing on the works of Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael. The class considers the origin and development of a monumental style in Italian art and concludes with an examination of the work of selected mannerist artists.

 

11577

 HR  240   Observation and Description

Gilles Peress

. . W  Th .

12:00-1:20 pm

HEG 200

HUM

See Human Rights section for description.

 

11167

ARTH 250   19th Century American Art

Tom Wolf

. . W Th .

10:30 - 11:50 am

PRE 110

AART

This class will study American art, concentrating on painting but looking at sculpture, architecture and decorative art as well, from the Colonial period through the end of the nineteenth century.  Artists considered will include John Singleton Copley, Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, and the painters of the Hudson River School.  Several class trips will be included, to take advantage of the splendid collections of American art in the Hudson River Valley and New York City.

 

11392

ARTH 256   Art of the 1980s

Noah Chasin

. T . Th .

2:30 -3:50 pm

RKC 103

AART

Courses on the history of late-twentieth-century art tend to begin with movements of the late 1960s-early 1970s and then move quickly into the most contemporary practices. Art of the 1980s serves as a multidisciplinary introduction to this most maligned of art decades. While the prevalent iconic documents of the time (Dallas, Miami Vice, Wall Street, the Brat Pack) dependably reemerge cyclically in the contested realm of popular culture, unawareness of the serious art practices from this decade is common. We will look at work by seminal painters, sculptors, and collectives from the US, Europe, Latin America, and Africa—e.g., Schnabel, Sherman, Gonzalez-Torres, Polke, Leirner, Watts, Group Material— examining these practices through the multivalent lenses of the decade’s important intellectual movements such as postmodernism, appropriation, deconstruction, and liberation theology. Contentious and/or momentous major exhibitions such as “Magiciens de la terre” and “Primitivism in 20th Century Art” (and the attendant rise of the curator-as-celebrity) will be evaluated in terms of their contemporary impact as well as their era-defining roles. Among the radically diverse themes we will cover are the East Village gallery scene (including Gracie Mansion and Civilian Warfare), graffiti culture, institutional critique, activist art, the cultural impact of the fall of communism and the rise of Reaganite neoliberalism, post-punk and new wave music, fashion and cultural icons, and video games, contributing to a larger understanding of this important, misunderstood decade. Assignments include short reviews and a final research paper.

 

11169

ARTH 289   Rights and the Image

Susan Merriam

M . W . .

12:00 -1:20 pm

OLIN 102

AART

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies, Human Rights (Core Course)   This course examines the relationship between visual culture and human rights. It considers a wide range of visual media, as well as aspects of visuality (surveillance, profiling). The course is taught using case studies ranging in time from the early modern period (practices in which the body was marked to register criminality, for example) to the present day (the images at Abu Ghraib). Within this framework, we will study how aspects of visual culture have been used to advocate for human rights, as well as how images and visual regimes have been used to suppress human rights. An important part of the course will consider the role played by reception in shaping a discourse around human rights, visuality, and images. Subjects to be addressed include: evidence; documentation and witness; the aestheticization of violence; disaster pornography; censorship; surveillance; profiling; advocacy images; signs on the body; visibility and invisibility. Requirements include response papers, a research paper, and two exams. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.    

 

11524

ARTH 291   Chinese Landscape Painting

Patricia Karetzky

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies  The Chinese love of landscape can be traced to ancient times when the mountains were considered the home of the immortals; such deep spiritual connotations maintained their vitality during the evolution of this most highly regarded of the pictorial arts. Through an analysis of the evolution of the Chinese landscape, the society’s rich poetic tradition, historical events, and cultural contexts are viewed.

 

11171

ARTH 321   The Animal Style in Arts

Jean French

M . . . .

4:30 -6:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

Cross-listed: Irish and Celtic Studies, Medieval Studies  This seminar explores the character and widespread diffusion of the “animal style” – a nonfigural, essentially abstract, and highly decorative art displaying a genius for pattern and fantasy. It reviews the art of the Scythians and Sarmatians, who roamed the steppes of Central Eurasia; manifestations of this style in the La Téne civilization and among Germanic tribes; and the treasures of Celtic Ireland and Anglo-Saxon England (among them, the magnificent Sutton Hoo ship burial). Attention is given to the art of the Vikings, other aspects of their culture, and Viking influence in areas as widespread as Ireland and Russia. The course concludes with an investigation of the influence of the animal style on the art of Romanesque Europe.

 

11172

ARTH 332   Villas of the Hudson Valley

Diana Minsky

. . . . F

1:30 -3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies    The villa or country house, as opposed to a working farm, embodies a city dweller’s idyllic interpretation of country life.  Built more to express an idea than fulfill a function, villa architecture allows its patrons and architects to create innovative means to express the relationship between man and nature.  The first month and a half of this seminar will study the characteristics and evolution of villas from ancient Rome to twentieth-century America before spending the rest of the semester visiting local sites where students will present their research.  The architecture of the Hudson Valley played a critical role in the evolution of the country house and landscape garden in America.  Using local archives in addition to published sources, each student will study an estate and situate it within the context of the history of villa architecture.  Requirements include critical essays, one class presentation, one research paper, and field trips.  Permission of the instructor required.  Limited to fourteen students.

 

11495

ARTH / REL 343   Popular Arts in Modern India

Richard Davis

M . W . .

3:00 -4:20 pm

OLIN 309

HUM

See Religion section for description.

 

11173

ARTH 360   Fin de Siecle:  Seminar in Symbolism, Art Nouveau, and Arts and Crafts

Tom Wolf

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

In this seminar we study developments in the fine and decorative arts at the end of the 19th and the early 20th centuries in Europe and the United States Topics explored include the anti-Realist reaction of artists such as Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, and Aubrey Beardsley; the development of the Arts and Crafts movement; photography at the turn of the century; and the relationship between the Arts and Crafts movement, the Vienna Werkstatte and Art Nouveau. Students will give presentations on selected subjects and there will be several field trips. Some background in art history preferred.

 

11174

ARTH 385   Art Criticism and Methodology

Noah Chasin

. . . . F

9:30 - 11:50 am

FISHER ANNEX

AART

This seminar, designed primarily for art history majors, helps students develop the ability to think critically about a range of different approaches to the field of art history. Students read and discuss a variety of texts in order to become familiar with the discipline’s development. Methodologies such as connoisseurship, cultural history, Marxism, feminism, and post-modernism are analyzed.