BARD COLLEGE

SPRING 2010 COURSELIST ADDENDUM

 

 

COURSES ADDED

 

11810

HIST 2138  Perpetual Peace: War, Pacifism and Utopia in German History

Gregory Moynahan

. T . . .

4:00 – 6:20 pm

RKC 200

HIST

Immanuel Kant began his famous essay “Perpetual Peace” by noting that for the cynic the topic of his essay could only apply to a graveyard.  Yet he proposes that through a better constitution of human institutions a realistic alternative, and a real peace, could be developed.  Can it?  Germany, the country that was responsible for the most horrific wars of the twentieth century, has certainly provided some of the bleakest responses to this question, but also some of the more constructive and utopian.  In this course, we will examine the dialectic of war and peace in Germany, and later the European Union, from the Thirty Years War to the present. Topics will include: the relation of peace treaties (Westphalia, Congress of Vienna, the Versailles treaties) to subsequent wars; the military realism of Clausewitz and Bismarck; the development of feminism, psychoanalysis and socialism as modes of pacifism; the relation of the holocaust to war ideologies; the post-war attempts in both Germanys to create a culture in which war was abhorrent; and finally the successes and failures of the European Union in relation to the problem of war.  Students will write a short 1-2 page paper each week in addition to a longer paper.  Class format will frequently involve strategic games, role-playing and exercises in communication.  

 

11809

BIO 422   Cary Institute Seminar in Ecology

Stuart Findlay

M . . . .

3:00 -5:00 pm

RKC 100

 

2 credits. The weekly seminar series hosted by the Cary Institute, Millbrook, NY, brings national leaders to speak about current topics in ecology. To enhance the opportunity for Bard graduate and undergraduate students to take advantage of these visitors, these seminars will be made available at Bard as part of this course. In advance of the talk, the instructor will assign readings so students can obtain background knowledge on the week's topic. Following the talk, the instructor will lead a discussion at Bard. When appropriate, the instructor will be accompanied by Cary Institute scientists who are specialists in the topic of the week’s discussion.

 

11238

BIO IND PJ   Independent Research 199-399

Philip Johns

. . W . .

9:00 - 11:00 am

RKC 113

 

2 credits

 

11897

LIT 2603   Scholasticism vs. Humanism

Karen Sullivan

. . . . F

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLINLC 120

ELIT

Cross-listed: Human Rights, Medieval Studies, Theology   Throughout the Middle Ages, intellectual life was dominated by scholastics, who sought to integrate reason and faith, logic and revelation, classical philosophy and the Christian Gospels. For many of these thinkers, the City of Man, in which we now live, should ideally mirror the City of God, in which we hope one day to reside: both are single, unified, exquisitely ordered and hierarchical structures, in which the individual part is harmoniously integrated into the greater whole.  During the Renaissance, however, intellectual discourse was taken over by humanists, who stressed empiricism over abstraction, rhetoric over dialectic, and Plato over Aristotle as the means of access to truth. With experience now privileged over logic, the personal, subjective perception expressed in literature became prized over the impersonal, seemingly objective cosmos of philosophy.  In this seminar, we will be exploring the tension between scholastic and humanist thought against the background of the rise of the university, the shift from Gothic to Renaissance architecture, the discovery of the New World, and the eruption of the Protestant Reformation, as well as within the context of more recent historical eras.  Authors to be read include Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Erasmus, Rabelais, Montaigne, and Descartes.

 

11813

MATH 131   Exploration in Number Theory

Samuel Hsiao

M .  W . .

1:30 - 2:50 pm

RKC 102

MATC

This course will provide an overview of one of the oldest and most beautiful areas of mathematics. It is ideal for any student who wants a taste of mathematics outside of the calculus sequence. Topics may include: number puzzles, prime numbers, congruences, quadratic reciprocity, sums of squares, Diophantine equations, cryptography, coding theory, and continued fractions.  Prerequisite: Calculus background or very strong Precalculus background.

 

DIVISION OF THE ARTS

 

Description correction:

11192

ART 210 NL  Printmaking II: THE

UNIQUE PRINT

Nicola Lopez

M . . . .

9:30 - 12:30 pm

FISHER 139

PART

This will be a primarily studio-oriented class in which you will work on a series of projects that push the boundaries of printmaking to reach beyond the traditional parameters of the medium. Through hands-on projects, you will explore the possibilities that printmaking offers in crossing-over into drawing, sculpture and other media.  You will be challenging yourself in terms of format, scale, technique and content/concept and will be encouraged to mix various printmaking techniques as well as other media.   Solid technical knowledge of at least one print medium (preferably more) is a pre-requisite for taking this class. Studio work will happen alongside a series of discussions that will be supplemented by student presentations.  We will have regular class critiques and that focus on both formal aspects and content/concept and will also use texts and the work of other artists as a departure point for conversation.

 

New Course:

11602

MUS 363   John Cage and His World

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

4:00 -6:20 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed:  STS  Long reviled as a charlatan or a madman, John Cage has finally achieved recognition as probably the most influential composer and musical thinker of the latter twentieth century.  This course will focus primarily on analysis of Cage’s music, encompassing such innovations as the prepared piano, chance, and indeterminacy.  It will be set in the context of the work and thought of his numerous teachers and influences, as well as colleagues and collaborators from the worlds of music (Satie, Schoenberg, Varese, Cowell, Harrison, Feldman, Brown, Wolff, Tudor), visual arts (Duchamp, Futurism, Dada Fluxus, Rauschenberg, Johns), dance (Cunningham and others) religious thought (Meister Eckhard, Hinduism, Taoism, the I Ching, Zen Buddhism) literature, political and social writing (Thoreau, Joyce, Fuller, McLuhan). Student work may take the form of papers, analyses, realizations and performances of Cage scores, or creation of new works inspired by Cagean examples.  Texts will include Silence, A Year from Monday, and other writings by and about Cage. By consent of the instructor. This course fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.

 

New course:

11618

MUS WKSPO   Introduction to Electronic Music

Richard Teitelbaum

Miguel Frasconi

. . W . .

4:00-6:20 pm

BLM N119

PART

This hands-on workshop will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus primarily on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog recording techniques and devices. Topics to be covered include the physics of sound, psychoacoustics, and foundational practices in electro-acoustic sound production and their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on digital signal processing, instrument "discovery" and exploration, field recording, and modes of electronic diffusion, including multichannel installation, broadcast, live performance and multimedia. Students will be given instruction in the use of ProTools, Quicktime with Protools for soundtrack production, and will become familiar with sampling, multi-track recording, editing, and mixing. Throughout the semester, students will produce field recordings and other original recordings in diary format and will receive instruction and guidance in utilizing this work for electronic composition, performance and installation. Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring the aesthetic, political, historical and personal implications of music technology and its uses. Enrollment in this course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios. In addition to the digital workstations, students can also explore analog synthesis techniques using the vintage Serge modular synthesizer.

 

Schedule change:

11305

MUS WKSP7   Jazz Vocal Workshop

John Esposito

M . . . .

4:30 -6:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

 

 

Schedule change:

11515

CNSV 113   Orchestral Training

& Repertoire

Leon Botstein /

Erica Kiesewetter

M . . Th .

7:00  - 9:30 pm

.

 

 

DIVISION OF LANGUAGES & LITERATURE

LITERATURE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: five courses in the Division of Languages and Literature before or during the semester of moderation, including two sequence courses, which must be in the same sequence but need not be consecutive. Sequence courses are English Literature I, II, III; U.S. Literature I, II, III; and Comparative Literature A, I, II, III.  Only one creative writing course may count toward the five.

 

Description correction:

11509

LIT 204A   Comparative Literature A:

Ancient Quarrels-The Critique of Literature in Greek and Latin Antiquity

Thomas Bartscherer

. T . Th .

1:00 – 2:20 pm

OLIN 304

ELIT

Cross-listed:  Classical Studies  In a celebrated passage from Plato’s Republic, Socrates claims that there is “an ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry.” In this course, we will consider this and other ways in which ancient authors (or their characters) configured the relationship between poetic production and theoretical inquiry, and therewith gave birth to the practice of literary criticism in the West. We will begin with Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, focusing particularly on the understanding of poetry manifest within the world of these poems. Readings from Greek literature will also include lyric poetry (focusing on Sappho and Pindar), and Attic drama (e.g., Aristophane’s Frogs and Clouds, Aeschylus’ Prometheus Bound, Euripides’ Medea and Bacchae). Readings from the Latin corpus will include the epic poetry of Vergil and Ovid, the lyrics of Horace and Catullus, and Roman drama (including Plautus’s Amphitryon and Seneca’s Medea). Concurrently, we will be examining the ongoing critique of literature from the fragments of early Greek philosophers (e.g. Anaxagoras, Xenophanes, Heraclitus), through Plato and Aristotle, to Cicero, Horace, Longinus, and Plotinus. Our twofold aim will be to develop an understanding of all these texts in their original context and to consider how they set the stage for subsequent developments in western literature and criticism.

 

New course:

11612

LIT 2183   Milan Kundera and the Art

of Fiction

Helena Sedlackova Gibbs

M . W .  .

1:30 - 2:50 pm

ASP 302

ELIT

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1982) by the Czech/French writer Milan Kundera is regarded as an exemplification of the postmodern novel. This course will examine how Kundera’s idiosyncratic textual strategies explode traditional notions of character and fictional identity, and unsettle the comfortable boundaries between such oppositional categories as the fictional and factual, totalitarian and democratic, or Eastern and Western.  It will discuss Kundera’s use of philosophy and history, placing his novels in the context of larger political issues, such as the question of Central Europe and the situation in Czechoslovakia during the Cold War.  It will also consider matters of language and translation (cinematic as well).  Additional readings will include a wide spectrum of Kundera’s works (The Joke, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting, Immortality), as well as his writings about fiction (The Art of the Novel, Testaments Betrayed).  Each class is organized around supplemental texts by Nietzsche, Broch, Calvino, Fuentes, Rorty, Havel, Brodsky, Benjamin, and Huyssen, among others. 

 

Description amended:

11094

LIT 364   Shakespeare Seminar

Nancy Leonard

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 310

ELIT

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies  Shakespeare wrote in early modern London, in the early years of the seventeenth century, when the streets were crowded with newcomers in a population that had doubled in less than a hundred years. Country folk wanted to buy the inherited titles of noblemen (the King let them: he needed their money).  Aristocrats, laughing at brand-new “nobles” wearing fur, were often in serious debt for their own tastes. There was jostling, excitement, and luxury, and social changes which challenged who modern Londoners thought they were. Voyages of discovery, for instance, sometimes brought back Indians, who donned English costumes—the “Other” in disguise as the “Self.” Shakespeare in some plays is a very urban dramatist, reflecting the vital life of the city of London. The seminar will read Shakespeare’s, Henry IV, Part I, Much Ado about Nothing, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and The Tempest, along with relevant texts, to explore how this burgeoning capitol of Europe registered in urban terms the issues of ethnicity, gender, identity, empire, sexuality, and class difference.

 

Distribution changed:

11502

LIT 3037  A Thousand and One Nights

in Comparative Perspective

Elizabeth Holt

. . . Th .

9:30 – 11:50 am

OLIN 308

FLLC

 

Schedule and distribution changed:

11321

LIT ITAL 3365   Modern and Contemporary

Italian Women Writers:  Literature in Translation

Amelia Moser

. . W . .

4:00 -6:20 pm

OLIN 305

FLLC

 

Schedule changed:

11076

ARAB 102A   Elementary Arabic II

Elizabeth Holt /

Nadia Haddad

M T W Th .

9:20 – 10:20 am

OLIN 204

FLLC

 

11595

ARAB 102B   Elementary Arabic II

Elizabeth Holt /

Nadia Haddad

M . W . .

.  T . Th .

2:30-3:30 pm

2:30-3:30 pm

OLIN 102

OLINLC 115

FLLC

 

11078

ARAB 302   Advanced Arabic

Mouannes Hojairi

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLINLC 115

FLLC

 

Schedule changed:

11132

RUS 106   Russian Intensive

Marina Kostalevsky / Tamara Mikhaylova

M T W Th .

10:30 - 12:30 pm

OLIN 307

FLLC

 

Schedule changed:

11142

SPAN 201   Intermediate Spanish I

Gabriela Carrion

. T W Th F

9:20 - 10:20 am

OLINLC 120

FLLC

 

DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE, & COMPUTING

Room change:

11243

CMSC 117   Introduction  to Computing: Interactive Systems

Keith O'Hara

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

RKC 100

MATC

 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL STUDIES:

Distribution changed:

11318

ANTH 212   Historical Archaeology

Christopher Lindner

. . . . F

12:30 -5:30 pm

HEG 300

HIST/DIFF

 

New course:

11600

HIST 192  “The Age of Extremes”: Topics

in Modern European History 1789 - Present

Gregory Moynahan

M . W . .

3:00 – 4:20 pm

OLINLC  208

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies  This course will present a thematic survey of European history in the modern period.  Each week we will illuminate pivotal transformations in the era using different methodologies and forms of history, ranging from demographic and gender history to diplomatic and military history.  The class will thus offer an in-depth presentation of key aspects of modernity and a survey of contemporary historiography. Issues discussed will include: the relation of the agricultural and industrial revolutions to long-term ecological and demographic change; the intensification of capitalism as the basis of social organization; the coextensive development of competing ideologies of conservatism, anarchism, socialism, communism and liberalism; the role of Europe in the global economic system, “scientific racism,” and neo-colonialism; the creation of new institutions of technological research, patent, and communication; the wars of the twentieth century, systematic genocide, and the development of a military-industrial technocracy; the transformation of the state system through the European Union; and the effect of mass media on definitions of the public sphere and political action.  A rudimentary grasp of modern European history is assumed, but supplemental reading will provide a broad narrative base for students with no background in the field.

 

HIST/SOC 213 is cancelled, replaced by:

11601

SOC / HIST 214 Contemporary American Immigration

Joel Perlmann

. T. Th  .

4:00 – 5:20 pm

OLIN  202

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed:  American Studies, Human Rights, Social Policy, SRE  This course will include a backward glance at American immigration in the period 1930 through 1965, but it focuses primarily on the contemporary immigration (1965-2010) that began arriving after immigration law was changed in the later year. Major themes include similarities and contrasts to earlier periods of American immigration, who comes and why; the immigrants’ economic impact on American society (including the economic impact on the native-born poor); how the children of the immigrants have fared; whiteness, multiculturalism and assimilation; and finally immigration policy and politics. This is the second part of a year-long course which deals with both past and present; either half may be taken separately.

 

New courses:

11613

HIST  2812  The  History of International Institutions

Jonny Cristol

M . . . .

 . . W . .

3:00 -4:20 pm

3:00 -4:20 pm

HEG 201

RKC 115

HIST

Cross-listed:  History, Human Rights  This class will trace the history of international institutions from the Concert of Europe to the European River Commissions to the United Nations and the World Trade Organization. It will examine the internal political debates and the geopolitical context that led to the demise of the League of Nations and the rise of the United Nations. Special attention will be paid to: the roles of Wilson, FDR,  and Truman; the Dumbarton Oaks, Yalta, and San Francisco Conferences; the historical role of regional organizations such as CARICOM and ASEAN; and the rise and consequence of the international financial institutions created at Bretton Woods. We will also look at the major successes and failures of these institutions over the last 200 years.  The class will end with a discussion of the future of these organizations and a look at alternative models of organization.

 

11608

PS 282  NGOs, Civil Society, and Development

Monique Segarra

. T . Th .

9:00 -10:20 pm

OLIN 205

SSCI

Cross-listed:  GIS, Human Rights  Non-state actors play an increasingly visible role in global governance and in the domestic politics of countries in the global south.  The dramatic growth of transnational social movements and NGOs has generated intense academic and policy interest in, and debates over, the roles that NGOs and civil society can play in promoting political and economic development.  Some argue that NGOs and other civil society actors are critical players in supporting democracy and good governance; others that the pre-occupation with them reflects a bourgeois fetish held by the international development community that sustains liberalism and the market, and helps to spread it around the world. This class provides an overview of the theories and debates surround NGOs and civil society, and examines them by using case studies of specific transnational networks, movements, and project work in the areas of the environment, sustainable development, global health and poverty alleviation programs. The cases are drawn from Africa, Asia and Latin America. Questions addressed in the course include: What explains the growing prominence of non-state actors in global politics and development practice? What are the opportunities and challenges to transnational collaboration in networks or development partnerships? How accountable are NGOs? What are the limits of transnational activism? How does transnational development work ‘fit’ with national development policies?

 

Schedule changed:

11338

PS 380   Political & Legal Thinking

Roger Berkowitz

M . . . .

4:30 -6:50 pm

McCarthy House

HUM

 

Schedule changed:

11158

REL 141   Sanskrit II

Richard Davis

. T W Th .

9:20 - 10:20 am

OLIN 203

FLLC

 

 

Additional cross-listings:

 

11189

ARTH 128   Art of the Ancient Near East

Julia Rosenbaum

. T . Th .

4:00 – 5:20 pm

RKC 102

AART

Cross-listed: Middle Eastern Studies

 

11613

HIST  2812  The  History of International Institutions

Jonny Cristol

M . . . .

 . . W . .

3:00 -4:20 pm

3:00 -4:20 pm

HEG 201

RKC 115

HIST

Cross-listed:  Human Rights

 

11608

PS 282  NGOs, Civil Society, and Development

Monique Segarra

. T . Th .

9:00 -10:20 pm

OLIN 205

SSCI

Cross-listed:  GIS; Human Rights 

 

11298

MUS 235   Music of Claudio Monteverdi

Frederick Hammond

. T . Th .

10:30 - 11:50 am

OLIN 104

AART

Cross-listed:  Italian Studies 

 

11586

PHYS 234   The Atmosphere and Ocean

In Motion

Gidon Eshel

. T . Th .

4:00-5:20 pm

HEG 102

MATC

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

11506

THTR 310C   Survey of Drama:

Why Make Theater?

Joanne Akalaitis

. . W . .

4:30 –7:30 pm

 

AART

Cross-listed:  Human Rights