19174

SPAN 110   Accelerated First Year Spanish

Carlos Perez

M T W Th .

9:20  -10:20 am

OLINLC 206

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   A course designed for the student who has had some prior exposure to Spanish or who has excellent command of another Romance language. All the major topics in grammar will be covered, and the course will provide intensive practice in the four skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing). We will be using a new textbook specially designed to provide a streamlined review of basic topics in grammar and provide more detail and exercises for advanced topics. The textbook will be supplemented with authentic video material from Spain and 'Latin America. One additional hour per week of practice with the Spanish tutor and a substantial amount of work in the language resource center will also be required. The course will prepare the student for summer language programs abroad or Spanish 201 the following semester. Prospective students must speak with instructor prior to registration.   

 

19207

SPAN 201   Intermediate Spanish I

Gabriela Carrion

M T W Th .

10:30  -11:30 am

OLINLC 210

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   For students who have completed Spanish 106, 110, or the equivalent (  two or three solid years of high school Spanish). This course is designed to perfect the student's command of all four language skills (speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing). This will be achieved through an intensive grammar review, conversational practice, reading of modern Spanish texts, writing simple compositions, and language lab work. Prospective students must speak with instructor prior to registration.  

 

19201

SPAN 202   Intermediate Spanish II

Nicole Caso

M T W Th .

10:30  -11:30 am

OLINLC 120

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   This course continues refining and perfecting the student’s mastery of speaking, reading, comprehending, and writing Spanish.  Advanced study of grammar is supplemented by a video series and authentic readings on a wide variety of topics related to Spanish and Latin American history, literature, music, and art.  Current topics in culture such as the Latin American military dictatorships or issues surrounding the Hispanic presence in the United States will be discussed.  In addition to shorter readings, such as excerpts from Don Quixote and indigenous Mexican poetry, students may read a short modern novel.  Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or permission of instructor.  Prospective students must speak with instructor prior to registration.  

 

19053

SPAN 220   The Hispanic Presence in US

Melanie Nicholson

M . W . .

10:30  -11:50 am

OLINLC 206

FLLC/DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights, LAIS, SRE   This multidisciplinary course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the historical, social, political, legal, and linguistic issues surrounding the Hispanic presence in the United States.  It will also give advanced Spanish students an opportunity to utilize and improve their communication skills and broaden their cultural perspectives.  The first four weeks of the semester will be devoted to instruction in ESL (English as a Second Language) pedagogy.  At the end of this period, Bard students will be matched with Spanish speakers in the surrounding community and will begin providing instruction in conversational English.  For the remainder of the semester, students will meet in seminar format to discuss course readings.  Guest lecturers, both from within the Bard faculty and from other community agencies, will be invited to address students on particular issues, including the history of Hispanic immigration in the US (with a focus on New York state), economic issues regarding immigrants and migrants, particularly as they relate to the Hudson Valley in the past decade; political conflicts arising out of illegal immigration; legislation and the role of the INS; attitudes toward Hispanics (stereotyping; conflation of racial, linguistic, and class issues in relations among Hispanics, other minority groups, and the English-speaking majority); and issues surrounding bilingualism.  Conducted in Spanish and English.  Student must have completed Spanish 202 or its equivalent, and must  have approval of instructor prior to registration.

 

19056

SPAN 302   Introduction to Latin

American Lit.erature

Nicole Caso

M . W . .

M . . . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

3:00 pm -4:00 pm

OLIN 303

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   This course serves as an introduction to the interpretation of literary texts from Latin America.  It covers a broad range historically—from pre-Conquest times to the present—and presents all literary genres, including poetry, short stories, novels, essays, and plays.  This course is intended to prepare students for more advanced and specialized courses in Hispanic literature.  A great deal of attention is paid to the development of critical skills, both verbally and in writing.   This is a writing intensive course. Students will spend an extra hour a week in a writing lab. The writing component will focus on helping students to develop, compose, organize, revise, and edit analytical prose; to develop the ability to identify and articulate a thesis; to construct an argument; to collect and present evidence and documentation; to interpret and analyze texts; and to become proficient in the mechanics of writing, revision, grammar, and editing. Regular short writing assignments will be required.  Conducted in Spanish. Please note: Spanish 301 or 302 are Prerequisites for all 300-level literature seminars in Spanish.  Prospective students must speak with instructor prior to registration.  On-line registration

 

19054

SPAN 306   Five Latin American Poets

Melanie Nicholson

M . W . .

3:00 pm -4:20 pm

OLINLC 208

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   This course will examine the work of five twentieth-century Latin American poets:  Pablo Neruda (Chile), César Vallejo (Peru), Octavio Paz (Mexico), Nicolás Guillén (Cuba) and Alejandra Pizarnik (Argentina).  Although students will be asked to read extensively within the obra of each of these writers, class time will be mainly spent in close analysis of selected texts.  Outside readings will help orient students to the historical, social, and political contexts in which these writers produced their work.  In this regard, we will attempt to answer these and other questions:  What occasioned the shift, in Neruda and Vallejo, from a vanguardist, hermetic poetry to a more accessible and socially-oriented poetry?  How are Eastern religious and philosophical orientations, particularly those of Buddhism, manifested in the work of Paz?  In what ways does the poetry of Guillén respond to racial and socio-political issues crucial to an understanding of Cuba's history?  How can we apply contemporary discourses concerning gender and the representation of the body to the poetry of Pizarnik?  In addition to writing critical essays, students will be asked to memorize and recite short poems. 

 

19208

LIT 3128   Saints, Sinners & Lunatics

Gabriela Carrion

. T . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

OLINLC 208

FLLC

See Literature section for description.