By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case.  In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project. 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

College & Community Ensembles

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble one or two credit may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

Scholarship auditions will be held on Wednesday,  February 4, 2009.

 

19171

MUS 104   Bard College Orchestra

Nathan Madsen

M . . . .

7:00  -10:30 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. Auditions will be held on Monday January 26th, 2009 for new members. Please call to set up appt., 845-758-7131. * First Orchestra rehearsal will be on Monday January 26th, 2009 from 7:30 pm until 10:30 pm in Olin Hall. * (Please be prepared to play two pieces—one slower and lyrical, and one faster.)

 

19172

MUS 105   Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:00  -10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

First rehearsal will be on Tuesday February 3rd, 2009.

 

19462

MUS 106   Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

.TBA. . .

 

.

PART

Not available for on-line registration.

 

19463

MUS 108B   Ensemble: Contemporary

Joan Tower /

Blair McMillen

M . . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PART

Not available for on-line registration.

 

19464

MUS 108D   Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:00 pm -6:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits.  Auditions will be held by appointment for new members.  First rehearsal will be on Tuesday,  February 3rd, 2009. Not available for on-line registration.

 

19465

MUS 108F   Ensemble:Jazz Big Band

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

7:00 pm -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

Not available for on-line registration.

 

19466

MUS 108G   Ensemble: Chamber

The Colorado Quartet

. TBA . .

 

.

PART

Not available for on-line registration.

 

19467

MUS 108H   Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

TBA

M . . . .

7:00 pm -9:00 pm

.

PART

 

19468

MUS 108I   Ensemble: Live Electronic Perf

TBA

. . W . .

6:30 pm -8:30 pm

BLM HALL

PART

 

19469

MUS 108J   Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

. T . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

Not available for on-line registration.

 

19470

MUS 108N   Contemporary Jazz Ensemble

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:30 pm -6:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

 

19471

MUS 172   Jazz Harmony II

John Esposito

M . W . .

10:30  -11:50 am

BLM N211

PART

Part II - This course will include acquisition of the basic skills that make up the Foundation of all jazz styles.  We will also study the Jazz Language from the BEBOP ERA up to the 60’s. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.

 

19472

MUS 202   Music Theory II

Kyle Gann /

Sharon Bjorndal

M . . . F

. T . Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

1:00 pm -2:20 pm

BLM N217

BLM N217

PART

Continuation of Music Theory I, introduction to harmony, various seventh chords, secondary dominants, basics of modulation, four-part writing and voice-leading.  End result: ability to write a hymn, song or brief movement of tonal music.  Theoretical work will be complemented by weekly ear-training labs focused on developing the ability to sing and recognize secondary dominants, modulations, and so on. Prerequisite: Music Theory I or equivalent (knowledge of scales and keys).  This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors. (Monday and Thursday sessions are Theory, Tuesday and Friday are Labs.)

 

19473

MUS 212   Jazz Literature II

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:30  -11:50 am

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies, SRE  We will study the words of Gary Gidden “Visions in Jazz” and Robert Gottlieb from his book entitled “Reading Jazz” in order to bring attention to some important literature on Jazz. Some of the writers look beyond Jazz as an art form, but also bring attention to the historical influence on culture, race, tradition and our social experience.  Writers like Albert Murry, Ralph Ellison, Eudora Welty. There is an attempt in their works to illuminate the significance of the musical potential the musicians inherit and the creative option they exercise.  This course includes the words of many who have been hailed as Jazz Greatest Musicians.  Not available for on-line registration.

 

19474

MUS 219   19th Century Harmony

Kyle Gann

M . W . .

3:00 pm -4:20 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course will explore the Romantic Era in terms of its most colorful characteristic: harmony. Works by Chopin, Field, Mendelssohn, Robert and Clara Schumann, Brahms, Liszt and Scriabin will be analyzed, along with excerpts of larger works by Berlioz, Wagner, Bruckner and Mahler – for form and orchestration, but most of all to explore the flowering of ultrachromatic harmonic progressions and modulations. Along with augmented sixth chords, borrowed chords, enharmonic modulations, and chromatic voice-leading, the class will study the wealth of thematic transformation techniques that made late Romanticism such a fluid and often extramusically referential language. This course is intended for music majors, but is open to anyone who has fulfilled the prerequisite, Fundamentals I and II or the equivalent. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.

 

19475

MUS 232   20th Century Masters:

Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Shostakovich

Frederick Hammond

. T . Th .

10:30  -11:50 am

OLIN 104

AART

The work of these three composers encapsulates much of the history, techniques, and aesthetics of twentieth-century Western art music.  Arnold Schoenberg (1874- 1951) carried Wagnerian harmony to what he considered its logical conclusion, the destruction of tonality.  Igor Stravinsky (1882- 1971), the internationally successful product of Russian imperial culture, assimilated everything from Tschaikovskian romanticism to serial technique.  The tormented Dimitri Shostakovich ( 1906- 1975) spent most of his career trying to balance his own creative expression with the demands of the Stalinist government.  We will consider a core of major works (including an opera) by each composer: Schoenberg’s Verklarte Nacht (1899), Pierrot Lunaire (1912), Suite for Piano, Op. 25 (1923), Moses und Aron (1930- 32), and the String Trio, Op. 45 (1946); Stravinsky’s Sacre de Printemps (1913), Les Noces (1923), Apollon Musagete (1928), The Rake’s Progress (1951), and Agon (1957); Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth of Mdzensk (1932), Symphonies 2 (1927), 13 (“Babiy Yar, “ 1962), and 15 (1971), and the String Quartet no. 15 (1974).  Musical training is useful but not required.  The course satisfies a history requirement for Music majors.  Not available for on-line registration.

 

19476

MUS 254B   Pronunciation & Diction for Singers II

Sharon Bjorndal

. T . . F

10:30  -11:50 am

BLM N217

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature.  The fall semester will be devoted to the Italian and French languages, the spring to German, English, and Latin.  Through songs, arias, and choral literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language.  While it is geared towards singers and collaborative pianists, the course is also useful for other instrumentalists and students seeking to refine pronunciation and accent.  Grading will be based on a series of quizzes and two exams, including the preparation and performance of one song per language.  Ability to read music is not required.  No previous knowledge of the languages is required. 

 

19477

MUS 257   Production & Reproduction

Robert Bielecki

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N110

PART

This course will focus on the theory and practice of sound recording. Students will learn the use of recording equipment including digital tape recorders, mixing consoles, signal processing devices, and microphones. A/B listening tests will be used to compare types of microphones, microphone placement and many different recording techniques. ProTools software will be available for digital editing and mastering to CD. Assigned projects will include both multitrack and direct to stereo recordings of studio and concert performances. Enrollment is limited.  Not available for on-line registration.

 

19478

MUS 260   String Quartets of Beethoven

Colorado Quartet

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

OLIN 104

PART

The Colorado String Quartet will examine the personal and creative life of this great composer through the medium of his sixteen string quartets. The works will be placed in a historical and political context. Beethoven’s relationship with the writers and philosophers of the time, including Goethe, Schiller and Kant, will be examined through his creative development. During the semester the Colorado Quartet will perform selections from the sixteen Beethoven string quartets. No prerequisites, but the ability to read music is a plus. There will be listening and writing assignments.  Not available for on-line registration.

 

19479

MUS 265   Literature and  Language of Music II

Peter Laki

M . W . .

12:00 pm -1:20 pm

BLM N217

AART

A survey of selected musical works composed in the 19th and 20th centuries.  Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits.  In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams.  As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected.  This course is primarily designed for music majors including sophomores. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  It is not required that students have taken the first semester (Music 264), which covered music from the Middle Ages to 1800.

 

19480

MUS 266C   Jazz Repertory: BEBOP

 Masters

John Esposito

M . W . .

12:00 pm -1:20 pm

BLM N211

PART

This performance based course is a survey of the principal composers and performers of the BEBOP Era.  Musicians included are Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro, Bud Powell, Max Roach and others.  The course will include readings, recorded music and films.  The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony I or permission of instructor. This can be taken as a companion course with Jazz Harmony II.   

 

19602

MUS 266D   The Music of John Coltrane

John Esposito

 . . Th .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N211

AART

An immersion in the music of a Jazz master; includes readings, recorded music and films.  Coltrane’s music will be performed in a workshop setting by students and instructor.  Visiting artists will play and discuss the music. Prerequisites: Jazz Harmony II, or permission of Instructor.

 

19481

MUS 290   Death Set to Music

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

2:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course will discuss and analyze a number of key musical works that use death and mourning as subject matter.  Works to be analyzed will include the Requiems of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Giuseppe Verdi, Johannes Brahms, Benjamin Britten and Paul Hindemith.  Other works will include Johann Sebastian Bach’s Johannes-Passion, and Ich habe genug (Cantata 82).  Evaluation will be based on two exams and a research paper.  Prerequisites: One semester of Literature and Language of Music or an equivalent music history course.  This course fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.

 

19482

MUS 345   Introductory Psychoacoustics

Robert Bielecki

. T . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N110

AART

"Reality is a myth, perception is what matters".  This course will examine auditory perception and hearing  and serve as an introduction to how hearing works. The first half of the semester begins with a description of the physiology and function of the ear and how we process auditory information.   Some topics include: perception of pitch, loudness, location, auditory illusions, critical bands, masking, threshold of hearing, hearing loss, and audiometry.   The second half of the semester will focus on sound localization and the technologies used in spatialization and 3-D audio. We will explore auditory localization cues, HRTF, binaural recording, spatial audio synthesis, sound for virtual realities and immersive environments. This course should be of particular interest to anyone involved in music and audio technology.

 

19483

MUS 349   Jazz: Freedom Principle IV

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies  This Jazz History course which is part four of a four part course.  Part four is a study of Jazz after 1952 to the early 70’s.  The course will examine the extreme shifts in jazz styles from Cool, to Hard bop to the Arvant Garde.  Emphasis will be on musicians associated with these styles such as Stan Getz, Lee Konitz, Horace Silver, Hank Mobley, Anthony Braxton and Muhal Richard Abrams.  The course will discuss the solo and combo styles of these musicians.  The course employs a cultural approach designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music from 1952- 1972 and examine it’s effect on the music.  This will be illustrated with recordings and films.  The class requires oral presentation and critical listening.  This course is for juniors and seniors who have moderated into music.  This course fulfills a history requirement for music majors.  Not available for on-line registration.

 

19484

MUS 352   Electronics,  Electroacoustic,

and Computer Composition

. TBA

. . . Th .

9:30  -11:50 am

BLM N119

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing work as computer programs, digital or analog recordings and scores for live electronic realization.  These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members.  Installations and mixed media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Xenakis, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor.

 

19560

MUS 365  Music of Japan, Ancient and Modern

Richard Teitelbaum

. . W . .

1:30pm – 3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed:  Asian Studies  The course begins with an examination of the ancient repertories of Buddhist chant (shomyo) and court music (gagaku) that form the basis for traditional Japanese classical music. Other traditional genres to be studied will include the Zen-inspired shakuhachi (end-blown bamboo flute) honkyoku, and music for biwa (lute), shamisen and koto. After exploring the impact of Western music on Japan in the 19th and 20th centuries, the class will focus on the combination of traditional Japanese instruments and forms with Western contemporary classical techniques, as exemplified by the path breaking work of Toru Takemitsu, as well as that of Yuji Takahashi, Toshi Ichiyanagi, and others. Postwar experimental groups, including such key figures and groups as Yoko Ono, Takehisa Kosugi, Fluxus and Group Ongaku will be examined. Finally, recent developments in “noise” music by such figures as Merzbow, Otomo Yoshihide, and others that combine turntables and laptops with Japanese and western acoustic instruments will be studied. To this end, a special event featuring a concert and workshops by several leading Japanese composers and performers of computer and instrumental music will be presented at Bard during the week of March 9th by Music From Japan. These include computer composer Takayuki Rai, composer/performer Tomomi Adachi, shamisen player Mojibei Tokiwazu V  and violinist Mari Kimura.  Not available for on-line registration.

 

19486

MUS 367B   Jazz Composition II

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 pm -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This course continues the strategies from Jazz Composition I, including basic modal harmony, melodic and rhythmic development. Prerequisite: Jazz Composition I.

 

19461

MUS 371   Last Operas

Christopher Gibbs

M . . . .

4:00 pm -6:20 pm

BLM N210

AART

This course will explore the last opera of some of the greatest and most prolific composers of musical theater, with particular focus on Monteverdi’s The Coronation of Poppea (1642), Mozart’s The Magic Flute (1791), Wagner’s Parsifal (1882), Verdi’s Falstaff (1893), Puccini’s Turandot (1924), Strauss’s Capriccio (1942), and Britten’s Death in Venice (1973). We will consider the aesthetic category of “lateness” and the phenomenon of last works to see what commonalities might emerge from operas written in very different times and places. For each opera we will consider its literary and musical sources, its genesis, initial performance and reception, and production history. Every member of the seminar will focus on one “last opera” (not necessarily limited to those listed above) for a presentation and research paper.

MUSIC WORKSHOPS

 

19487

MUS WKSHA   Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M . . . .

4:30 pm -6:50 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class and then  eventually to professionals(the  Da Capo Players) who give a concert of some of that music at the end  of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had
intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement. Not open for on-line registration, please contact Prof. Tower.

 

19488

MUS WKSHB   Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart /

 Blair McMillen

. T . Th .

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

4:00 pm -6:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration.  Not available for on-line registration.

 

19489

MUS WKSHG   Workshop: Bach Arias

Frederick Hammond / Arthur Burrows

. . W . .

10:00  -12:00 pm

BDH RECI

PART

(2 credits)  In this singing class we will explore the arias and duets in the vast literature of the sacred cantatas of J.S. Bach.  We will consider technical vocal matters, historical context, performance practice, and general interpretation. Recommended for advanced vocal students.  Not available for on-line registration.

 

19490

MUS WKSHL   Opera Workshop

Rufus Muller

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BDH

PART

4 credits  Work is to be decided.  For more information see Professor Muller.   Contact  Prof. Müller by email: rumu2000@earthlink.net to arrange an audition before registration.

 

19491

MUS WKSHM   Workshop: The Queen

 is Dead

Rufus Muller

M . . . .

2:00 pm -4:20 pm

BDH

PART

(2 credits)  With the death of Queen Victoria in 1901, the opulent era of 19th century music began to give way to a century of change and upheaval.  In this course we shall explore the art song repertoire of 20th century Europe and America, with particular emphasis on performance and communication with the listener.  The course ends with a public recital.

 

19494

MUS WKSP4   Workshop:Jazz

 Improvisation II

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:00 pm -7:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  This class is structured as a continuation of Jazz Improvisation I. The goal will be to gain mastery over all of the basic scales used in traditional jazz improvisation, and to attain the ability to improvise over basic two-five patterns and simple modal progressions. Prerequisite:  Jazz Improvisation Workshop I, or consent of the instructor.

 

19495

MUS WKSP7   Jazz Vocal Workshop

John Esposito

. . . Th .

7:01 pm -9:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

 

19492

MUS WKSPO   Introduction to

Electronic Music

. TBA

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This hands-on workshop will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus primarily on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog recording techniques and devices. Topics to be covered include the physics of sound, psychoacoustics, and foundational practices in electro-acoustic sound production and their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on digital signal processing, instrument "discovery" and exploration, field recording, and modes of electronic diffusion, including multichannel installation, broadcast, live performance and multimedia. Students will be given instruction in the use of ProTools, Quicktime with Protools for soundtrack production, and will become familiar with sampling, multi-track recording, editing, and mixing. Throughout the semester, students will produce field recordings and other original recordings in diary format and will receive instruction and guidance in utilizing this work for electronic composition, performance and installation. Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring the aesthetic, political, historical and personal implications of music technology and its uses. Enrollment in this course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios. In addition to the digital workstations, students can also explore analog synthesis techniques using the vintage Serge modular synthesizer.

SPECIAL PROJECTS

Special projects are designed for music majors only, to pursue individual or group projects with a particular professor.  Schedules will be arranged.

 

19496

MUS PROJ B  Special Projects

James Bagwell

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

19497

MUS PROJ EL  Special Projects

Erica Lindsay

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

19498

MUS PROJ R  Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

19499

MUS PROJ U  Special Projects

Kyle Gann

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

19500

MUS PROJ V  Special Projects

Joan Tower

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

19501

MUS PROJ Z  Special Projects

Thurman Barker

. . . . .

 

.

PART