19329

MATH 107†† Topics in Geometrical Math

Ethan Bloch

M . W . .

10:30-11:50 am

HEG 102

MATC

Geometrical mathematics involves many topics other than traditional Euclidean geometry. This course explores topics that vary from semester to semester and may include some, but not all of the following: symmetry, groups, frieze and wallpaper patterns, graphs, surfaces, knots, and higher dimensions. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses and a willingness to explore new ideas and construct convincing arguments is a necessity.

 

19328

MATH 110†† Precalculus Mathematics

Maria Belk

M . W . .

3:00 pm -4:20 pm

OLINLC 115

MATC

A course for students who intend to take calculus and need to acquire the necessary skills in algebra and trigonometry. The concept of function is stressed, with particular attention given to linear, quadratic, general polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Graphing in the Cartesian plane and developing the trigonometric functions as circular functions are included.Prerequisites: successful completion of Q exam.††

 

19330

MATH 141 ACalculus I

Cliona Golden

M . W . .

9:00-10:20 am

HEG 106

MATC

An introduction to the basic ideas of differentiation and integration in one variable. Topics include limits, techniques of differentiation, definite integrals, the fundamental theorem of calculus, and applications.Prerequisite: Precalculus or the equivalent. ††

 

19070

MATH 141 BCalculus I

Ethan Bloch

. T . Th .

2:30 pm -3:50 pm

HEG 102

MATC

Se above.

 

19071

MATH 141 CCalculus I

Cliona Golden

M . W . .

10:30-11:50 am

HEG 106

MATC

Se above.

 

19072

MATH 142 ACalculus II

Samuel Hsiao

. T . Th .

1:00 pm -2:20 pm

RKC 111

MATC

 

 

 

. . . . F

1:00 pm -2:00 pm

RKC 111

MATC

This course, a continuation of Calculus I, reinforces the fundamental ideas of the derivative and the definite integral.Topics covered include L'Hopital's rule, integration techniques, improper integrals, volumes, arc length, sequences and series, powerseries, continuous random variables, and separable differential equations.Prerequisites:Mathematics 141 or the equivalent.

 

19073

MATH 142 BCalculus II

Maria Belk

M . W . .

10:30-11:50 am

ALBEE 106

MATC

 

See above.

 

. . . . F

10:30-11:30 am

ALBEE 106

MATC

 

19327

MATH 191†† String Theory

Gregory Landweber

. . W . F

3:00 pm -4:20 pm

HEG 102

MATC

This class will introduce the mathematical ideas underlying string theory, a theory of particle physics which supposes that the fundamental constituents of matter and energy are not points, but rather tiny strings or loops. No prior background in physics is required. We will read and discuss several popular books on string theory as a means to motivate concepts from the entire mathematical curriculum. These ideas include: complex numbers, quaternions, and their generalizations; Taylor series and Fourier series; spaces of dimensions 4 and higher; the geometry and topology of two dimensional surfaces; non-commutative algebra; and supersymmetry. Prerequisites: Mathematics 141 or the equivalent.

 

19074

MATH 212 ACalculus III

John Cullinan

. T . Th .

9:00-10:20 am

HEG 102

MATC

This course investigates differentiation and integration of multivariable functions. Topics covered include vectors, coordinate systems, vector valued functions, partial derivatives, gradients, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, change of variables, line integrals, Greenís theorem, and Stokeís theorem.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 141 and 142 or the equivalent. ††

 

19076

MATH 242 ALinear Algebra

With applications

Gregory Landweber

. T . Th .

1:00 pm -2:20 pm

HEG 106

MATC

Cross-listed: Cognitive Science†† This course will cover the basics of linear algebra in n-dimensional Euclidean space, including vectors, matrices, systems of linear equations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, as well as applications of these concepts to the natural, physical and social sciences.Equal time will be given to computational, applied, and theoretical aspects of the course material.Prerequisite: Math 141-142 or permission of the instructor. ††

 

19077

MATH 242 BLinear Algebra

WithApplications

Jules Albertini

M . . . .

. .W . .

3:00 pm -4:20 pm

4:30 pm - 5:50 pm

RKC 101

RKC 101

MATC

See above.

 

19078

MATH 261 AProofs and Fundamentals

Samuel Hsiao

. T . Th .

10:30-11:50 am

HEG 106

MATC

This course introduces students to the methodology of mathematical proof. The logic of compound and quantified statements, mathematical induction, and basic set theory including functions and cardinality are covered. Topics from foundational mathematics are developed to provide students with an opportunity to apply proof techniques.Prerequisite: Mathematics 141 and 142, or permission of instructor.†† ††

 

19079

MATH 261 BProofs and Fundamentals

Lauren Rose

M . W . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

HEG 106

MATC

See above.

 

19332

MATH / CMSC 303†† Computational Geometry

Mary Krembs

. T . . .

1:00 pm -2:20 pm

RKC 100

MATC

Cross listed: Computer Science†† This class will cover a variety of topics from computational geometry. Focus will be given to computational complexity of the algorithms presented as well as appropriate data structures. Topics may include Voronoi Diagrams, convex hull calculations, line segment intersections and more. Pre-requisites: Math 212, Math 242 and some programming knowledge.

 

19333

MATH 319†† Probability and Statistics

Cliona Golden

. T . Th .

9:00-10:20 am

ALBEE 106

MATC

Everyday we make decisions based on numerical data in the face of uncertainty. We do so while reading the latest political polls, playing a card game, interpreting a medical diagnosis, or analyzing a scientific experiment. Probabilistic models and statistical methods help us to think through such decisions in a precise mathematical fashion. This course provides a calculus-based introduction to techniques and applications of probability and statistics. Topics considered will include random variables and their distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: Math 212. Some knowledge of Linear Algebra is helpful. For students concentrating in economics, Math 319 can substitute for Economics 229.

 

19331

MATH 321†† Partial Differential Equations

John Cullinan

. T . Th .

1:00 pm -2:20 pm

RKC 102

MATC

This course is an introduction to the theory of partial differential equations.  The primary focus is the derivation and solutions of the main examples in the subject rather than on the existence and uniqueness theorems and higher analysis.  Topics include hyperbolic and elliptic equations in several variablesDirichlet problems, the Fourier and Laplace transform, Green's functions.

 

19081

MATH 332†† Abstract Algebra

James Belk

. T . Th .

2:30 pm -3:50 pm

RKC 102

MATC

An introduction to modern abstract algebraic systems. The structures of groups, rings, and fields are studied together with the homomorphisms of these objects. Topics include equivalence relations, finite groups, group actions, integral domains, polynomial rings, and finite fields. Prerequisite: Mathematics 261 or permission of the instructor.

 

19334

MATH 432†† Advanced Algebra:

Galois Theory

Lauren Rose

. T . Th .

10:30-11:50 am

ALBEE 106

MATC

This course is a continuation of Mathematics 332.The primary goal is to develop the Galois theory of fields.Toward that end we study the theory of field extensions including algebraic extensions, automorphisms of fields, splitting fields, and separable extensions.As time permits we may develop some topics in advanced group theory such as series of groups and the Sylow theorems. Prerequisites: Mathematics 331 and 332, or permission of the instructor.

 

19335

MATH 454†† Knot Theory

Ethan Bloch

M . W . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

ALBEE 106

MATC

Knot theory is an active branch of contemporary mathematics that,  similarly to number theory, involves many problems that are easy to  state but difficult to solve; unlike number theory, knot theory  involves a lot of visual reasoning.  Knot theory is a branch of  topology, but it also has applications to aspects of biology,  chemistry and physics (though for lack of time these applications will  not be discussed in class).  This course is an introduction to the  theory of knots and links.  Topics include methods of knot tabulation,  knot diagrams, Reidemeister moves, invariants of knots, knots and  surfaces, and knot polynomials.  Prerequisites: Math 351 or Math 361,  or permission of instructor.