19387

BIO 124 Backyard Ecology

Kenneth Howard

. T . Th .

LAB: . T .

10:30 -11:50 am

1:00 pm -4:00 pm

RKC 111

RKC 114

LSCI

Our backyards contain numerous species of plants, animals, and fungi, but what is really happening to the populations that live so close to us? Humans have created unique, fragmented natural and semi-natural environments surrounded by human development and agriculture. This course will focus on how natural populations in these habitats function and interact with nearby natural areas, the effects of humans, attempts at controlling natural populations, our introductions of exotic species, and our shifting views of what is natural versus unnatural in the gradation between urban, suburban, and agricultural habitats. In the lab, students will study a semi-natural local habitat, propose hypotheses related to the biodiversity and ecology of the habitat, measure biodiversity and hunt for exotic species, then make recommendations for ways to manage the habitat to better support local populations and meet diverse human needs.

 

19388

BIO 142 A1 Organismal Biology

William Maple

. . W . F

10:30 -11:50 am

RKC 103

LSCI

 

 

 

LAB A: Th

1:00 pm -4:00 pm

RKC 114

LSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental Studies An introduction to organismal biology and ecology, primarily for those who intend to continue in biology; also open to interested students not majoring in science. Topics include population genetics, evolution, vertebrate embryology and anatomy, and animal phylogeny, taxonomy, and ecology. Biology 142 may be taken before Biology 141, if necessary. Students majoring in biology are strongly encouraged to enroll in Chemistry 142 concurrently. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses.

 

19389

BIO 142 A2 Organismal Biology

William Maple

. . W . F

10:30 -11:50 am

RKC 103

LSCI

 

See above.

 

LAB B: F

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 114

LSCI

 

 

19390

BIO 150 Evolution of Model Organisms

Philip Johns

. . W . F

10:30 -11:50 am

RKC 101

LSCI

 

 

 

LAB: M

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 112

LSCI

This is an introductory course aimed at studying the genetics and evolution of organisms. Along with major themes in those areas, we will examine topics ranging from ecology and behavior to physiology and biomechanics. A major theme of the course will be to understand why biologists often use a few "model organisms" to examine topics that are more widely applicable. Includes a lab. Prerequisites: Q-eligible

 

19391

BIO 151 From Genes to Traits

Michael Tibbetts

. . W . .

10:30 -12:30 pm

RKC 111/112

LSCI

 

 

 

. . . . F

9:30 -12:30 pm

RKC 111/112

LSCI

Cross-listed: GISP; Science, Technology & Society; SRE This course takes an introductory look at the relationships between genetics, environment, and biochemistry. It is intended for students with a strong interest in science and is appropriate for biology majors. The course will begin with an examination of heredity in both classical and modern molecular contexts. It will then focus on the relationships between genes and proteins, and the complex biochemical interactions that produce a phenotype. The course will culminate in a discussion of the ways in which the environment interacts with multiple genes to influence complex traits, for example schizophrenia, and the modern methods applied to the problem of identifying the genetic components of these traits. The laboratory will provide an opportunity to examine some of the principles discussed in the lecture in more detail and to become acquainted with some of the methodologies and instrumentation found in a modern biology laboratory. Prerequisite: successful completion of Q exam, and experience in high school biology and chemistry.

 

19393

BIO 202 Ecology and Evolution

Catherine O'Reilly

. . W . .

10:30 -12:30 pm

RKC 114/115

LSCI

 

 

 

. . . . F

9:30 -12:30 pm

RKC 114/115

LSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental Studies This core course for biology majors is an introduction to the general principles of ecology and evolution that, with genetics, form the core of biological understanding. In addition to studying foundational ideas in both ecology and evolution, we will explore modern topics at the boundary between these two areas. We will consider, for example, how genetic variation among individual organisms can influence ecological interactions, and how these interactions can influence fitness. We will focus on a mechanistic understanding of processes, using model-building to inform that understanding. Offered every spring. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Eukaryotic Genetics (Biology 201).

 

19394

BIO 204 Introduction to Physiology

John Ferguson

M . W . .

8:30 -10:20 am

RKC 111

LSCI

 

 

 

LAB: T

2:30 pm -5:30 pm

RKC 112

LSCI

Cross-listed: GISP The focus of this course is the relationship between the physical and chemical functions of various organs and organ systems to overall homeostasis, with an emphasis on human physiology. Systems examined include the central and peripheral nervous systems, muscle, the heart and blood vessels, blood, the lungs, the kidneys, the digestive system, the endocrine glands, and the reproductive systems. Laboratory work provides practical experience in relevant topics of human physiology. This course is appropriate for those interested in a career in the health professions and others interested in animal biology. Prerequisites: Biology 141-142, Chemistry 141-142; Chemistry 201-202 is recommended concurrently.

 

19395

BIO 304 Cell Biology

Michael Tibbetts

. T . Th .

8:30 am -9:50 am

RKC 111

LSCI

This course examines the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in processes relating to eukaryotic cellular organization, communication, movement, reproduction, and death. These topics are considered through close reading of the primary and secondary literatures. Discussions of review articles on particular topics precede in-depth discussions of one or more research articles in those areas. The literature is read with the objective of understanding the current models describing cellular processes, as well as the experimental rationale and the modern techniques used to probe fundamental cellular mechanisms and test the models. The laboratory consists of a semester-long project in which a cellular process is investigated. Offered in alternate spring semesters. Prerequisites: Biology 201-202, and Chemistry 201-202.

 

19418

BIO 316 Tropical Ecology

Catherine O'Reilly

. . . . F

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 115

LSCI

Tropical ecosystems are among the most biodiverse, most threatened, and the least studied in the world. This course will examine both practical and theoretical aspects that are unique to tropical ecosystems, including the role of geology, biogeochemical cycling, evolutionary processes and species interactions. In addition, we will discuss issues related to conservation, such as habitat fragmentation and climate change. This course will include lectures, student presentations, and research projects. Students will design, conduct, synthesize, and present a field research project. There will be a trip to conduct the research projects in La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica over spring break. Additional costs will apply. Application form required. Contact the instructor for more information. Prerequisites: Moderation, Bio 202 Ecology and Evolution, permission of the instructor. Not available for on-line registration.

 

19396

BIO 404 Prokaryotic & Viral Genetics

John Ferguson

. T . Th .

10:00 -11:50 am

RKC 115

 

A consideration of biological inheritance in prokaryotes (bacteria) and their viruses (bacteriophage). Topics include the genetics of mutagenesis, repair and recombination, transformation, plasmids, conjugation, intemperate phages, temperate phages, transduction, gene regulation, restriction endonucleases, and gene splicing. Lectures will alternate with student presentations of classic papers in chronological order. Prerequisites: Biology 201and 303, and Chemistry 201‑202.

 

19398

BIO 417 Sexual Selection

Philip Johns

. . . Th .

2:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 115

 

In this seminar course, we will examine the topics of sexual selection, mate competition, and mate choice, primarily in animals. We will look at classic models that have shaped the study of sexual selection as well as recent outgrowths of those models. A major theme of this course is to look at how recent advances in genomic studies have changed studies of sexual selection and sexually selected traits. As a group, we may undertake one major laboratory project. Prerequisites: Bio 201 and Bio 202, Biostatistics encouraged.

 

19399

BIO 418 Conflicts in Social Biology

Kenneth Howard

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:30 pm

RKC 115

 

The evolution of complex sociality remains one of the great, unsolved mysteries in biology. Social evolution has generated tremendous examples of cooperation, but also tremendous conflict between cooperating individuals and between scientists attempting to explain their origins. This seminar will investigate three major areas of conflicts in social biology: 1) conflicts between scientists over the underlying causes of cooperation and eusocial evolution 2) conflicts between parents and offspring over resources and offspring phenotypes, and 3) conflicts between the sexes over resources and mating decisions. Theories underlying sociality are currently in flux, as some social researchers have returned focus to ecological benefits of cooperation, while others continue to emphasize the role of kinship in promoting sociality. Students will read seminal and modern papers that present important issues with sociality, and discuss these issues in class. Students will be encouraged to think critically about biological theory, and draw their own conclusions as to how natural selection has led to a variety of social behaviors.

 

19397

BIO IND KH 199-399 Independent Study

Kenneth Howard

. . .Th. .

1:00 pm 2:00 pm

RKC

 

Students will study two conflicts using cavity-nesting ants as a model organism. Ants that were collected the previous fall and overwintered will be raised in a lab setting. At least one student will investigate why adults bite their larvae and how that affects the caste fate of the larvae. Another student will record sex ratios produced, and discuss how that may or may not apply to genetic versus ecological influences on eusocial evolution. A third student will use males and females produced by these nests to study mating behavior in the lab, with particular focus to whether larger females choose larger males when mating. At the same time, these nests will have been screened the previous fall for the intracellular parasite Wolbachia, which may influence reproductive decisions of their hosts. Therefore, two additional questions can be addressed (by additional students or as a back-up for the above projects): whether Wolbachia increases the production of females over males, and whether Wolbachia influences the mating success of females, as can occur in other insects. Co-requisite: Conflicts in Social Biology.