Course

BGIA 301   BGIA Core Seminar

Professor

Jonathan Becker

CRN

18504

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

The Core Seminar provides an academic framework for students to explore issues of global affairs and to contextualize their internship experiences. The goal is to familiarize students with key issues in world affairs, introduce them to some of the primary actors and how they operate (NGOs, policy wonks, private researchers), and help them bridge the divide between their academic work and their pre-professional experiences. It is structured in two parts: 1) major topics in global affairs; and 2) research and writing related to students’ specific internships. This format serves as a bridge between BGIA’s formal and non-formal educational program, challenging students to develop skills in critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and written and oral expression.

 

Course

BGIA 319  Issues in Global Public Health

Professor

Julie Becker / Kate Bourne

CRN

18506

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

This course provides a general overview of determinants of health in the developing world and principles within the field of global public health. It will include a review of some current and historical public health problems, such as tuberculosis, malaria, AIDS, small pox, maternal and infant mortality and reproductive health and rights, and the approaches used to understand and address them. Students will also examine the roles of a range of international organizations involved in global public health efforts, including local and international non-governmental organizations, multilateral agencies such as the WHO, UNAIDS, bilateral organizations like the CDC and USAID, governments and donor organizations. The course aims to convey an understanding of the complexity of health problems in developing countries, the impact of health on social and economic development, the contributions of various disciplines and analytical perspectives in decision-making about public health priorities, and the range of players that contribute to developing and implementing the programs to address them. The course will be structured primarily around a series of case studies of public health policies and practices around which there has been controversy or debate about the appropriate course of action. The case studies will include a major focus on HIV/AIDS and sexual and reproductive health, and will examine such issues as quarantine, testing of new technologies on vulnerable populations, commitment of resources to treatment versus prevention, and the influence of conflicting "moralities" on public health program approaches. These debates will examine the tensions that sometimes arise between efforts to ensure public health and safety, while promoting health equity and rights. It will incorporate perspectives of stakeholders in the developing world, as well as scientists, policy makers and activists. The analysis and readings will draw from various disciplines, including epidemiology and medical anthropology.

 

Course

BGIA 324  The Architecture of International Affairs: Advanced Theory and Practice

Professor

Jonathan Cristol

CRN

18507

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

This upper-level seminar will begin with a look at varying theories of international relations, with an emphasis on modern works and articles of particular importance to international relations in the post Cold War and post 9/11 era. We will examine to what extent, if any, the role of theory plays in the practice of international affairs. In the second half of the course we will start by learning about how American foreign policy is made and carried out. For most of the second half, we will discuss multilateralism and how the major international organizations (particularly, but not exclusively, the United Nations and World Trade Organization) actually function. The “nuts and bolts” of foreign affairs. The goal of the class is to develop an advanced understanding of how foreign policy and the international system operate in theory and practice. A basic knowledge of international relations theory is helpful, but not required. Authors to be read include: Francis Fukuyama, Samuel Huntington, Christopher Layne, John Mearsheimer, Bruce Russett, and William Wohlforth.

 

Course

BGIA 326  Trends in Terrorism and Counterterrorism

Professor

Thomas Parker

CRN

18508

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

This course charts the rise of international terrorism and examines State responses to this evolving threat. Seminars will consider case studies drawn from Europe, Africa and the Middle East. The course aims to give students a deeper understanding of the circumstances that motivate terrorist groups and the means and methods available to States seeking to contain or defeat them.

 

Course

BGIA 330  International Affairs Writing

Professor

Andrew Nogorski

CRN

18505

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

Americans are more acutely aware than ever of the differing perceptions of the United States in the world, and how many gaps there are in our knowledge of other societies and cultures. Our primary method of trying to plug those gaps is by reading articles and books about international affairs. Who writes these and how? What is the impact of different approaches on perceptions of international affairs? What are the possibilities and limitations in writing about international affairs? This course will examine a representative sampling of articles and books by journalists about foreign affairs, and will include discussions with experienced reporters and editors about their work. But this is primarily a writing course, and students will be expected to write an article every week. Their assignments will include news stories, travel pieces, profiles, op-eds and review essays. They will discuss each other’s writing in class, and they will learn about editing and revising their stories. They will also be encouraged to submit a finished article for publication.

 

Course

BGIA 356  Crusader America: Democratic Promotion in U. S. Foreign Policy

Professor

Omar Encarnacion

CRN

18509

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

Almost alone among the world’s superpowers, the United States has made promoting democracy abroad a central objective of its foreign policy. The origins of what has been called “America’s Mission” runs from the very birth of the American state in 1776, when the founding fathers declared the United States to be an exemplar state to guide the political development of other nations, to the ongoing attempt by the George W. Bush administration to give Iraq a democratic makeover. This course explores three core questions about America’s attempts to promote democracy abroad. What explains the genesis and persistence of the centrality of democracy in American foreign policy? How have American administrations endeavored to construct policies to advance democratic development abroad? And why have American attempts on behalf of the promotion of democracy abroad so often fallen short of their intended goal of creating stable democratic states, a point underscored by the American experience in Iraq.