Course

HR 210   The Great Dictators

Professor

Ian Buruma

CRN

17498

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   3:00-4:20 pm        Olin 204

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: HIST

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l. Studies; PIE core courseBy the end of the 20th century, many dictators had been deposed, had stepped down, or died: Chairman Mao, the Shah of Iran, Ferdinand Marcos, 'Baby' Doc, Emperor Bokassa, General Pinochet, and more. New ones have been slow to emerge. This seminar will investigate whether we have seen the last of the great dictators, or whether they will reemerge, and if so, in what form. We will review the history of great dictators, starting with the first emperor of China, Qin Shih Huangdi, and ending with the post-colonial dictators in our own time. We will read history, as well as literature, to provide a picture of what kinds of strongmen ruled in different times and cultures, and how they have gone down in history. We would also look at the reasons why people allowed themselves to be ruled by priest-kings, Big Daddies, Fuehrers, and other types of dictator. This will be an investigation into political legitimacy: religious, nationalistic, cultural, economic, and so forth.  By looking at dictators of the past, the seminar also seeks to offer a sharper sense of contemporary politics, its dangers and pitfalls. This should lead to discussions - more topical than ever now - on how to defend democratic freedoms, on the dangers of media monopolies, and on the nature of human rights in different historical and cultural contexts.

 

Course

HR / LIT 218   Free Speech

Professor

Thomas Keenan

CRN

17392

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   12:00-1:20 pm      Olin 204

Distribution

OLD: A/C

NEW: HUM

Cross-listed:  Human Rights (core course)

An introduction to the intersections between literature and human rights, from the Greeks to the French Revolution, Salman Rushdie, hate speech and torture. The course will examine the ways in which rights, language, and public space have been linked together in ideas about democracy. What is 'freedom of speech'? Is there a right to say anything? We will investigate who has had this right, where it has come from, and what it has had to do with literature. Why have poetry and fiction always been privileged examples of freedom and its defense? What powers does speech have, who has the power to speak, and for what? Is an encounter with the fact of language, which belongs to no one and can be appropriated by anyone, at the heart of democracy?  In asking about the status of the speaking human subject, we will ask about the ways in which the subject of rights, and indeed the thought of human rights itself, derives from a 'literary' experience. These questions will be examined, if not answered, across a variety of literary, philosophical, legal and political texts, including case studies and readings in contemporary critical and legal theory (Foucault, Derrida, Butler, Spivak, Fish,  Agamben).

 

Course

HR 321   New Orleans after the Disaster II

Professor

TBA

CRN

17558

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Humanities / Rethinking Difference

Description to follow.

 

Course

ANTH 233  Problems in Human Rights

Professor

John Ryle

CRN

17465

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   9:00 - 10:20 am   OLIN 310

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: Human Rights (core course)

The global expansion of the human rights movement has been accompanied by a high degree of professionalization in research and advocacy and an expanding body of rights doctrine. But the ascendancy of human rights discourse has not gone unchallenged. The course approaches current debates about rights through an examination of the problems faced and techniques developed in specific campaigns - from the nineteenth-century anti-slavery campaign to the landmine ban campaign of the 1990s. The course has a practical bias. How are human rights reports written?  How do human rights organizations measure their success?  What is the difference in approach between different organizations, e.g. Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and the International Committee of the Red Cross?  The course considers the challenges to the western discourse of human rights posed by such issues as child soldiers and female genital cutting. When, if ever, are indigenous values more important than universal principles?  It looks at the question of genocide and the failure of international action in Rwanda and Sudan.  And it considers the current embrace of human rights discourse by the evangelical Christian movement and its relation to the original anti-slavery campaign. What is the relation of human rights to religious values?  Has human rights itself become a kind of religion?  Finally, what are the limits of rights? Do animals have rights?  Which animals?  And what rights?  

 

Course

ANTH 261   Anthropology of Violence and Suffering

Professor

Laura Kunreuther

CRN

17013

 

Schedule

Tu Th          4:00 -5:20 pm      OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: A/C

NEW: Humanities / Rethinking Difference

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies, Human Rights (core course)

Why do acts of violence continue to grow in the ‘modern’ world?  In what ways has violence become naturalized in the contemporary world?  In this course, we will consider how acts of violence challenge and support modern ideas of humanity, raising important questions about what it means to be human today.  These questions lie at the heart of anthropological thinking and also structure contemporary discussions of human rights.  Anthropology’s commitment to “local culture”  and cultural diversity has meant that anthropologists often position themselves in critical opposition to “universal values,” which have been used to address various forms of violence in the contemporary world. The course will approach different forms of violence, including ethnic and communal conflicts, colonial education, torture and its individualizing effects, acts of terror and institutionalized fear, and rituals of bodily pain that mark individuals’ inclusion or exclusion from a social group.  The course is organized around three central concerns.  First, we will discuss violence as a means of producing and consolidating social and political power, and exerting political control.  Second, we will look at forms of violence that have generated questions about “universal rights” of humanity versus culturally specific practices, such as widow burning in India and female genital mutilation in postcolonial Africa. In these examples, we explore gendered dimensions in the experience of violence among perpetrators, victims, and survivors. Finally, we will look at the ways human rights institutions have sought to address the profundity of human suffering and pain, and ask in what ways have they succeeded and/or failed.  Readings will range from theoretical texts, anthropological ethnographies, as well as popular representations of violence in the media and film.  This course fulfills a core class requirement for the Human Rights program. On-line registration

 

(See main section for course descriptions.)

Course

ANTH 213   Anthropology of Medicine

Professor

Diana Brown

CRN

17225

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   1:30 -2:50 pm      OLIN 107

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

ANTH 270   Gender and  Feminism in Anthropology

Professor

Megan Callaghan

CRN

17010

 

Schedule

Tu Th          2:30 -3:50 pm      OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

ANTH 278   The State in Sub-Saharan Africa

Professor

Mario Bick

CRN

17009

 

Schedule

Tu Th          9:00 - 10:20 am   OLIN 107

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

ANTH 279   Islam and Europe

Professor

Jeffrey Jurgens

CRN

17012

 

Schedule

Tu Th          10:30 - 11:50 am  OLIN 305

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science / Rethinking Difference

 

Course

ANTH 280  The Edge of Anthropology

Professor

John Ryle

CRN

17466

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   12:00 - 1:20 pm   OLIN 310

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

ARTH 235   Tale of Two Cities

Professor

Noah Chasin / Ivan Sablin (Smolny)

CRN

17368

 

Schedule

Tu Th          10:00 - 11:20 am  HDR 302

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Analysis of Art

 

Course

ARTH 247   Photography 1950-Present  From “Human Documents” to the Image World

Professor

Laurie Dahlberg

CRN

17371

 

Schedule

Wed Fr  10:30 - 11:50 am   Fisher Annex

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Analysis of Art

Cross listed: Human Rights, Photography, Science, Technology & Society

In the decades after World War II, photography’s social and artistic roles changed in many ways. The 1950s saw the dominance of magazine photography in Life and Look and witnessed the birth of a more personal photographic culture, exemplified by Robert Frank’s book The Americans. In the 1960s and 1970s, photographers such as Diane Arbus, Garry Winogrand, and Lee Friedlander created a new view of contemporary life from moments gathered in the streets and from private lives. Beginning in the late 70s, artists trained outside of traditional photography began to employ the camera for wholly different purposes, using photography to pose ideological questions about images and image-making in a media-saturated culture. Today, the transformation of photography through digital technology has again thrown the meaning(s) of photographically-derived images into question. This lecture/discussion class will cover the historical context of this period and tease out fundamental issues of photography and its ostensible “nature” and the politics of representation. Student performance will be evaluated in class discussion, exams, and papers. No prerequisites, but preference ill be given to moderated photography and moderated art history students. On-line registration

 

Course

ANTH 348   Discipline, Punishment,  and the Embodied Self in China

Professor

Angela Zito

CRN

17182

 

Schedule

Mon  3:00 – 5:20 pm  OLIN 101

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science / Rethinking Difference

 

Course

CEP 308   Tools for Analysis: Geographic Information Systems

Professor

Mark Becker

CRN

17190

 

Schedule

Wed            12:00 -2:30 pm     ALBEE / HDR

Distribution

OLD: E

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society

2 credits.This course, offered in cooperation with the Bard Center for Environmental Policy (BCEP) is designed to provide students with a comprehensive review of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and remote sensing technologies as they apply to many environmental fields. Students will learn the fundamental theory underlying the structure and use of GIS. Through a mixture of lectures, readings and hands-on exercises, students will acquire an understanding of the structure of spatial data and databases, basic cartographic principles, how to conduct spatial analysis and the methods for developing sound practices for GIS project design and management. The course will focus on examples of how GIS and related geo-technologies are used in conservation planning, environmental management, and urban/regional planning. Open to Upper College (moderated) students; permission of the director of BCEP (ranville@bard.edu)   is required.

 

Course

ECON 115   Economic Dimensions of World Issues

Professor

Sanjaya DeSilva

CRN

17022

 

Schedule

Wed            10:30 - 11:50 am  OLIN 101

Fr                10:30 - 11:50 am  OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

ECON 252   Law and Economics

Professor

Tsu-Yu Tsao

CRN

17185

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   7:00 -8:20 pm      OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: A/E

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

FILM 235  Video Installation

Professor

Les LeVeque

CRN

17489

 

Schedule

Wed            9:00 - 12:00 pm AVERY 116 / 333

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

This production course will investigate the historical and critical practice known as video installation as a vehicle for activating student composed projects. Since the beginning of video art artists have experimented with installation. Wolf Vostell and Nam June Paik’s use of multiple monitors in the 1960’s, Joan Jonas’ incorporation of video with live performance, Juan Downey and Steina’s experiments with interactive laser discs, the use of live feeds, large and small video projections on walls and objects, imply complex shifts of narrative composition as well as temporal and spatial relationships. Through readings and screenings our discussions will examine this diffuse practice. Students will be encouraged to explore high and low tech solutions to their audio visual desires and should be prepared to imagine the campus as their canvas. Prerequisite: Introduction to the Moving Image: Video/Film.

 

Course

FILM 253   Political Video

Professor

Les LeVeque

CRN

17490

 

Schedule

Wed   1:30 – 4:40 pm  AVERY 217

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

This video production class will investigate the work of film and video artists who have found it necessary to produce work that is critical of a specific social or political situation.  Whether didactic, subversive, agit-prop, rant, provocation or documentation these works employ inventive solutions to visual aesthetics and narrative structure that rephrase normalized notions of communication and spectatorship. Throughout the semester we will engage in an examination of these practices, past and present, through the screenings of a wide range of experimental film and video art including Guy Debord, Jonas Mekas, Carolee Schneemann, Martha Rosler, Antonio Muntadas, Yvonne Rainer, Harun Farocki, Not Channel Zero, Craig Baldwin, The Atlas Group, Byran Boyce, Critical Art Ensemble, Tony Cokes, and Speculative Archive.  Assigned readings of historical and theoretical texts will augment the screenings and class discussions.  Students will be expected to apply these investigations to the production of three video projects. Prerequisite: Introduction to the Moving Image: Video.

 

Course

HIST 1001   Revolution

Professor

Robert Culp / Gregory Moynahan

CRN

17032

 

Schedule

Tu Th          10:30 - 11:50 am  OLIN 205

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

 

Course

HIST 141   A Haunted Union: Twentieth Century Germany and the Unification of Europe

Professor

Gregory Moynahan

CRN

17042

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   1:30 -2:50 pm      OLIN 305

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

 

Course

HIST 2301   China in the Eyes of the West

Professor

Robert Culp

CRN

17221

 

Schedule

Tu Th          1:00 -2:20 pm      OLIN 205

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History / Rethinking Difference

 

Course

HIST 3105   Migration & Identity in the Modern World

Professor

Lia Paradis

CRN

17226

 

Schedule

Wed            9:30 -11:50 am    OLIN 301

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

 

 

Course

HIST 3142   Violence in Colonial America

Professor

Christian Crouch

CRN

17220

 

Schedule

Th               4:00 – 6:20 pm    OLIN 310

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

 

Course

HIST 3143  Perspectives of War: The Pacific War Through Japanese and American Eyes

Professor

Ian Buruma

CRN

17503

 

Schedule

Tu   1:30 – 3:50 pm  OLIN 307

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

 

Course

HIST 3235   War, Old Media & Performance

Professor

Tabetha Ewing

CRN

17223

 

Schedule

Fr                9:30 - 11:50 am   OLIN 310

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

 

Course

HIST/ SOC 3335   America, its Jews & Israel

Professor

Joel Perlmann

CRN

17246

 

Schedule

Th               4:00 -6:20 pm      OLIN 203

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History / Rethinking Difference

 

Course

LIT 2159  Into the Whirlwind:  Literary Greatness and Gambles under Soviet Rule

Professor

Jonathan Brent

CRN

17382

 

Schedule

Tu               7:00-9:20 pm       Olin 202

Distribution

OLD: B

NEW: Literature in English

 

Course

LIT 2192   Queer Theory

Professor

Nancy Leonard

CRN

17506

 

Schedule

Tu Th   1:00 – 2:20 pm            Olin 310

Distribution

OLD: A/C

NEW: Humanities / Rethinking Difference

 

Course

CLAS / LIT 230   “Like Strangers in Our Own City": Life and Literature in the Late Roman Republic, 78-43 BC

Professor

Benjamin Stevens

CRN

17044

 

Schedule

Tu Th          2:30-3:50 pm       Olin 202

Distribution

OLD: B/D

NEW: Foreign Language, Literature & Culture

 

Course

LIT 238   Modern African Fiction

Professor

Chinua Achebe

CRN

17381

 

Schedule

Wed            1:30-3:50 pm       Olin 101

Distribution

OLD: B

NEW: Literature in English

 

Course

LIT 2882   Different Voices, Different Views

Professor

Justus Rosenberg

CRN

17396

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   9:00- 10:20 am    Olin 203

Distribution

OLD: B

NEW: Literature in English

 

Course

LIT 328   Ideology and Politics in  Modern Literature

Professor

Justus Rosenberg

CRN

17397

 

Schedule

Wed            1:30-3:50 pm       Aspinwall 302

Distribution

OLD: B/C

NEW: Literature in English

 

Course

LIT 3310   Middle Eastern Literature and Post-Colonial Theory

Professor

Youssef Yacoubi

CRN

17404

 

Schedule

Tu Th          9:00- 10:20 am    Olin 308

Distribution

OLD: B/D

NEW: Literature in English/ Rethinking Difference

 

Course

LIT 3364   The Slave Narrative

Professor

Mathew Johnson

CRN

17391

 

Schedule

Tu               4:00-6:20 pm       Olin 202

Distribution

OLD: B

NEW: Literature in English/ Rethinking Difference

 

Course

LIT 3209   Media and Conflict

Professor

Thomas Keenan

CRN

17393

 

Schedule

Tu               4:00-6:20 pm       Olin 309

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: HUM

 

Course

PHIL 220   Relativism

Professor

David Shein

CRN

17216

 

Schedule

Tu Th          2:30 -3:50 pm      OLIN 303

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Humanities

 

Course

PHIL 255   Medical Ethics

Professor

Daniel Berthold

CRN

17214

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   9:00 - 10:20 am   ASP 302

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Humanities

 

Course

PS  104    International Relations

Professor

Jonathan Cristol

CRN

17517

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   3:00  - 4:20 pm    HEG 201

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

 

 

Course

PS 130   Introduction to Chinese Politics

Professor

Nara Dillon

CRN

17051

 

Schedule

Wed Fr       10:30 - 11:50 am  OLIN 202

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science / Rethinking Difference

 

Course

PS 218   Theories of the Self, Gender Politics and Anti-Racism

Professor

Elaine Thomas

CRN

17227

 

Schedule

Tu Th          1:00 -2:20 pm      OLIN 101

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science / Rethinking Difference

 

Course

PS 266   Holy War and Sacred Peace: Religious Conflict in the 21st Century

Professor

Walter Mead

CRN

17228

 

Schedule

Th      7:00 – 9:20 pm  OLIN 202

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

PS 267   Foundations of Law

Professor

Roger Berkowitz

CRN

17468

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   12:00 -1:20 pm     OLIN 205

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

PS 329   Popular Protest in the Modern World

Professor

Nara Dillon

CRN

17052

 

Schedule

Th               4:00 -6:20 pm      OLIN 107

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

PS 380  Advanced Topics in  Political  and  Legal Thinking

Professor

Roger Berkowitz

CRN

17230

 

Schedule

Tu               4:00 -6:20 pm      OLIN 304

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

PSY 215   Stereotypes, Prejudice, and Discrimination

Professor

Matt Newman

CRN

17233

 

Schedule

Tu Th          1:00 -2:20 pm      OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: C/E

NEW: Social Science/ Rethinking Difference

 

Course

REL 321   Seminar in Islamic Law: Jihad

Professor

Ismail Acar

CRN

17176

 

Schedule

Wed            1:30 -3:50 pm      OLIN 205

Distribution

OLD: A/C

NEW: Humanities / Rethinking Difference

 

Course

SOC 120   Inequality in America

Professor

Yuval Elmelech

CRN

17239

 

Schedule

Tu Th          10:30 - 11:50 am  OLIN 203

Distribution

OLD: C/E

NEW: Social Science/ Rethinking Difference

 

Course

SOC 203   The  History of Sociological Thought

Professor

Michael Donnelly

CRN

17240

 

Schedule

Tu Th          10:30 - 11:50 am  PRE 128

Distribution

OLD: A/C

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

SOC 205   Introduction to Research Methods

Professor

Yuval Elmelech

CRN

17241

 

Schedule

Tu Th          1:00 -2:20 pm      OLIN 203

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: Mathematics and Computing

 

Course

SOC 246   Race & Ethnicity: The Key Concepts

Professor

Amy Ansell

CRN

17242

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   1:30 -2:50 pm      OLIN 301

Distribution

OLD: A/C

NEW: Social Science/ Rethinking Difference

 

Course

SOC 332   Seminar on Social Problems

Professor

Yuval Elmelech

CRN

17243

 

Schedule

Wed            9:30 - 11:50 am   OLIN 305

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

 

Course

SOC 338   Welfare States in Comparative Perspective

Professor

Michael Donnelly

CRN

17244

 

Schedule

Wed            1:30 -3:50 pm      PRE 101

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science